All times are in CET. 

Sunday, August 15, 2021
05:00PM - 07:00PM
Room 1
Opening ceremony & KEYNOTE Diane Larsen-Freeman
Format : Plenary
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Diane Larsen-Freeman, Keynote Speaker, University Of Michigan
Daniel Perrin, AILA President, AILA International Association Of Applied Linguistics
Kees De Bot, AILA2021 Organizer, Mentor, AILA 2021
Wander Lowie, University Of Groningen
Thony Visser, University Of Groningen
Azirah Hashim, AILA Vice-President , University Of Malaya
Marjolijn Verspoor, Chair AILA Organizing Committee And Mentor, University Of Groningen
Moderators
Marjolijn Verspoor, Chair AILA Organizing Committee And Mentor, University Of Groningen
Wander Lowie, University Of Groningen
 Diane Larsen-Freeman (Diane Larsen-Freeman is a Professor Emerita in Education and in Linguistics at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan and a Visiting Senior Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania).  Diane has been a leading figure in the world of Applied Linguistics for many decades. Her interests range from language pedagogy to grammaring and to the role of Complex Dynamic Systems in Second Language Development. She has published widely in articles and books and is cited extensively. For the Groningen AILA2021 organizers she was the obvious choice for the opening address! 
From the 'What If's' to the 'So What's’: Updating our Understanding of Second Language Development from a Complex Dynamic Systems Perspective
06:00PM - 07:00PM
Presented by :
Diane Larsen-Freeman, Keynote Speaker, University Of Michigan
From the 'What If's' to the 'So What's': Updating our Understanding of Second Language Development from a Complex Dynamic Systems Perspective
07:00PM - 08:00PM
Q&A and discussions with keynote speaker Diane Larsen-Freeman
Meet our keynote speaker Diane Larsen-Freeman in Gather Town at the class room straight after her session scheduled for Sunday, 15 August at 18:00 – 19:00 CET.Together with Kees de Bot, she will welcome you to answer any of your questions related to her presentation From the 'What If's' to the 'So What's': Updating our Understanding of Second Language Development from a Complex Dynamic Systems Perspective and engage in discussions as of 19:00 CET. Please join us in the Gather Town class room at the Activity Center. 
07:00PM - 08:00PM
Speed-Meetings
After the opening ceremony and keynote, it may be time for you to meet and mingle with other virtual delegates. This can be done by Speed-Meetings in which you get to talk for 4 minutes with a randomly selected delegate, and you can do as many rounds as you wish. Who knows who you will meet! We will set the timer for one hour, but 30 minutes in total will be fine, too. We will repeat this activity on Wednesday and Thursday. Join us here!
07:00PM - 08:00PM
AILA Solidarity Reception in AILA Gathertown in the AULA
Please join AILA's vice president, Azirah Hashim, to congratulate this year's AILA Solidarity Awardees. Go to Gathertown!
Monday, August 16, 2021
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S001 1/2 | ‘Spaces of otherwise’? South-North dialogues on languaging, race, (im)mobilities
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Christopher Stroud, University Of The Western Cape
Natalia Volvach, PhD Candidate, Stockholm University
Ayse Gur Geden, PhD Student, UCL Institute Of Education
Kathleen Heugh, University Of South Australia
Valelia Muni Toke, IRD
Özge Deniz, M.A. Student , Bogaziçi University
Qumrul Hasan Chowdhury, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University Of Dhaka
Jinny Choi, Associate Professor, University Of Texas At Arlington
Muchativugwa Hove, Presenter, North-West University, South Africa
Åsa Wedin, Presenter, Dalarna University
Mingdan Wu, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University College London
Mona Elsamaty, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University Of Toronto
Necia Billinghurst, University Of South Australia
Moderators
Caroline Kerfoot, Symposium Convenor And Presentor; Mentor, Stockholmsuniversitet
Saioa Cipitria, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
In writing of the 'economies of abandonment' of neoliberal globalization, Povinelli (2011) also points to the potential for 'spaces of otherwise', those spaces of curiosity and risk, potentiality and exhaustion which open possibilities for more ethical becoming and the emergence of new forms of social life. This symposium brings into dialogue scholars of the global South and North concerned with the material consequences of language, race, and structurally induced (im)mobility. South and North are understood here as labile signifiers whose meaning is determined by everyday material and political processes. The interaction of perspectives from the North and the South creates the opportunity to revisit the limits of representation in mainstream social sciences, reconstituting and expanding dominant theory so that it may become more productive in analysing social and linguistic realities. The symposium seeks, for example, to critically interrogate the affordances of recent concepts such as translanguaging, linguistic citizenship, and raciolinguistics for their power to critique and replace destructive institutional structures, classifications, and the technologies that sustain them. It thus seeks to enlarge knowledges of agents, practices, and processes which could lay the basis for what Papadoupolous (2011) calls 'alter-ontology' – new realities – and maximise the possibilities of hope.
Linguistic Citizenship in spaces of otherwise
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Christopher Stroud, University Of The Western Cape
In this talk, I will explore the idea of multilingualism as a technology in the conceptualization of alternative, competing futures. I build on the notion of Linguistic Citizenship as a blueprint for thinking differently about language, and multilingualism as a ‘site’ where we might relate ethically to others – and ourselves.
Breaking the silence in ‘spaces of otherwise’
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Natalia Volvach, PhD Candidate, Stockholm University
This ethnographic paper sheds light on how various agents use limited resources to create 'alternative spaces' in Crimea in the context of international isolation. The combination of a 'walking tour' technique with the analysis of linguistic landscapes demonstrates how the current state of affairs can be resisted, contested and/or disrupted.
Liminal Spaces Beyond the North and South Binary: The Case of Turkish-Speaking African Students as Bridges of Potentiality
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Ayse Gur Geden, PhD Student, UCL Institute Of Education
This presentation explores complexities and potentialities in Turkey as a liminal space occupying a fluid position between the global North and South. It draws from an ethnographic study that investigates the role of Turkish and English language learning with consequences for Sub-Saharan African students in Turkey, institutions and actors they engage with.
Shadows of coloniality and falling through the abyss: a sociolinguistics of despair or possibility?
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kathleen Heugh, University Of South Australia
Southern thinking and intermingling cosmologies, epistemologies and ontologies of decoloniality run through deep canyons carved through millennia. Sociolinguists nurtured within the northern academy must side-step hubris lest they fall through the abyss that lies between northern and southern ways of being, and the southern canyons of relevance they desire.
(Un-)desirable bodies? Health discourses on obesity in the South Pacific and the impossible “end of exoticism”
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Valelia Muni Toke, IRD
This paper explores gendered ethnicities in Polynesia through discourses about overweight bodies. Various forms of compliance and of resistance turn bodies into sites of politicized conflicts, as well as into potential “spaces of otherwise” that allow an expression of indigeneity which would coincide with the “end of exoticism”.
A linguistic ethnographic study: Multilingual Ugandans as (de-)skilled migrants in Istanbul
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Özge Deniz, M.A. Student , Bogaziçi University
This linguistic ethnographic study addresses two Ugandan women living in Istanbul as skilled migrants. The analyses of the participants' everyday language practices in the city aim to show how these two women construct and negotiate their identities as skilled migrants in Istanbul through their (non)deployment of languages in their multilingual repertoires.
The ‘what’ and ‘how’ of Southern knowledge in applied linguistics: English in rural Bangladeshi madrasa
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Qumrul Hasan Chowdhury, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University Of Dhaka
This paper reports ethnographic research on English at a madrasa in rural Bangladesh, and argues that in applied linguistics, Southern theories need to be critically informed by empirical work, not only engaging with heterogenous experiences but also reflecting on the processes involved in accessing these realities.
Transnational Mobility, Ethnic Identity and Language of Korean Community in Argentina
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Jinny Choi, Associate Professor, University Of Texas At Arlington
The present project studies the Korean-Spanish bilingual community in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The paper investigates the history of their transnational diaspora and mobility, the complexity of their ethnic identity construction and their language profile.
Ways of becoming: postcolonial literature and the limits of mimicry and hybridity
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Muchativugwa Hove, Presenter, North-West University, South Africa
This paper questions the ways in which language education could contribute to democratic cultural spaces and configurations through the use of purposefully selected literary texts. I argue that there is something disturbingly worrisome in the incompleteness and mimicry of the postcolonial state’s language and literature curriculum that uncannily resembles the class hierarchy, authority and cultural ways of the colonial order.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S003 | A transdisciplinary look at intra-individual variation in language development and change
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Peter Macintyre, Cape Breton University
Carlos Rico Castillo, Friedrich Alexander University
Betül Çimenli, AILA Solidarity Awardee, Bartin University
Katarzyna Rokoszewska, Assistant Professor, Jan Dlugosz University In Czestochowa
Katharina Korecky-Kröll, Postdoc Researcher, University Of Vienna
Erik Schleef, Full Professor, University Of Salzburg
Ali Al-Hoorie
Kedi Simpson, PhD Candidate; Solidarity Awardee, University Of Oxford
Marte Nordanger, Inland Norway University Of Applied Sciences
Paulina Horbowicz, Associate Professor, Inland Norway University Of Applied Sciences/Adam Mickiewicz University In Poznan
Moderators
Simone Pfenninger, University Of Salzburg
Lars Bülow, University Of Vienna
Nelleke Jansen (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
The theme of this symposium is intra-individual variation, that is, observable variation within individual entities, which plays an important role in the humanities area as well as in the natural and social sciences. Fields as diverse as cognitive neuroscience (cf. Port & Van Gelder, 1995), developmental psychology (e.g., van Geert, 1991), organizational behavior (Axelrod & Cohen, 1999; Guastello, 1995), and political sociology (e.g., Axelrod, 1984) have recently being reframed in terms that allow insight into basic dynamic properties that were previously overlooked. However, while these particular fields have recognized the complexity and dynamism of human thought and behavior, intra-individual variation has received less attention in regard to language behavior. Studies on intra-individual variation over time, however, are urgently needed in applied linguistics as well as variationist linguistics to validate the outcomes from group studies and to understand the process of individuals' linguistic development (cf. Lowie, 2017; Lowie & Verspoor, 2019). The main goal of the symposium is to bring together two subdisciplines – psycholinguistics and (variationist) sociolinguistics – in juxtaposing systematic intra-individual variation discussed in sociolinguistics and non-systematic intra-individual variation discussed in psycholinguistics, thereby fostering interaction between two disciplines that have had surprisingly little connection so far.08:20 – 08:30: Welcome and introduction of our featured speaker08:30 – 09:00: Peter D. MacIntyre09:00 – 09:10: Q&A09:10 – 09:30: Phil Hiver & Ali Al-Hoorie09:30 – 09:50: Kedi Simpson09:50 – 10:00: Q&A10:00 – 10:30: Coffee break10:30 – 10:50: Katarzyna Rokoszewska10:50 – 11:10: Marte Nordanger11:10 – 11:30: Erik Schleef11:30 – 11:50: Katharina Korecky-Kröll11:50 – 12:10: Q&A12:10 – 12:20: Mini break 12:20 – 12:30: Poster pitches by Betül Çimenli and Carlos Rico Castillo 12:30 – 12:50: Live session, general discussion and Q&A12:50 – 13:30: Informal lunch and opportunity to connect
Reframing individual differences as intra-individual variability: Reconceptualising emotion, motivation and willingness to communicate.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Peter Macintyre, Cape Breton University
Ironically, individual differences (ID) research in SLA often refers to differences within a sample, not an individual. Complex dynamic systems theory (CDST) re-imagines the meaning of individual differences in ways that complement, supplement, and challenge traditional approaches to ID variables. Specific empirical investigations in WTC, motivation, and emotion will serve as examples of intra-individual research.
Modeling co-adaptation between language development and task-specific individual differences
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Phil Hiver , Presenter, Florida State University
Ali Al-Hoorie
Co-authors :
Akira Murakami, Co-Author, University Of Birmingham
This study investigates how syntactic features of learners' interlanguage develop nonlinearly. Longitudinal data (T = 7) from Saudi learners of English (N < 90) analyzed using GAMMs and Bayesian mixed effects models showed nonlinearity and systematic variability in developmental pathways, and demonstrated the effect of task iteration in learner development.
Intra-individual variation in developmental trajectories of L2 French listening: eight case studies from a CDST perspective
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kedi Simpson, PhD Candidate; Solidarity Awardee, University Of Oxford
Tracking L2 French listening for a period of three years, this research takes eight case studies – students at a secondary school in England – and probes the intra- and inter-individual variation in listening comprehension as well as its contributory subsystems of working memory, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use and self-efficacy.
Intra-individual variation in the emergence of dynamic language subsystems at secondary school – a written corpus analysis.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Katarzyna Rokoszewska, Assistant Professor, Jan Dlugosz University In Czestochowa
Rooted in Complex Dynamic Systems Theory, the study which is based on a learner written developmental corpus (ca. 1900 essays written by 100 learners over 3 years), indicates that intra-individual variation significantly predicts the average semester growth rates (ASGR) of most measures of complexity, accuracy, and fluency. 
Variability in the development of an epistemic repertoire in L2 Norwegian
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Marte Nordanger, Inland Norway University Of Applied Sciences
Paulina Horbowicz, Associate Professor, Inland Norway University Of Applied Sciences/Adam Mickiewicz University In Poznan
In this presentation, we present preliminary results from a longitudinal study exploring the use of epistemic constructions in L2 Norwegian. By combining perspectives from Dynamic Systems Theory and sociocultural approaches to language, the study focuses on variability in individual learner trajectories as key to development and ability to perform agency.
Individual differences in intra-speaker variation: T-glottalling in England and Scotland
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Erik Schleef, Full Professor, University Of Salzburg
Sociolinguistic theory predicts stylistic variation to be similar within a community (Labov 1972). Data from London and Edinburgh suggest that style-shifting norms from speech to reading are mostly similar in London. In Edinburgh, some speakers do not style-shift, which suggests that different speakers hold varying views towards community norms.
Variation of noun plurals in German in Austria: individual preferences in first language acquisition and adult use
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Katharina Korecky-Kröll, Postdoc Researcher, University Of Vienna
Variation of noun plurals in German in Austria is investigated on the basis of adult and child language production data in different settings, with a focus on individual preferences. Results will be discussed from a psycholinguistic as well as from a sociolinguistic perspective.
A Conversation Analysis Inspired Investigation of Stylistic Variation
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Betül Çimenli, AILA Solidarity Awardee, Bartin University
This study aims to reveal how the participant accommodates his speech, interactional resources he deploys, and his motives for exhibiting (non-)accommodative behavior. First, 5 hours of naturally-occurring dyadic interaction was transcribed and analyzed. Then, a semi-structured interview was conducted to deepen the knowledge about the motivation behind his accommodative behavior.
Variability and Complexification in L2 writing Development: A Longitudinal Case Study
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Carlos Rico Castillo, Friedrich Alexander University
This is a report of a longitudinal case study carried out in a German international school. The researcher traced the language development of two learners of English (both eleven years old at the beginning of the study) by collecting writing samples periodically (every four weeks) for 22 months.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S014 | Building on shifting sands: literacies across and between institutional spaces
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Bojana Petric, Birkbeck, University Of London
Laura Mccambridge, University Teacher, University Of Jyväskylä
Maria Grant, Liverpool John Moores University
Annika Shaswar, Umeå University
Emily Peach, Lancaster University
Jackie Tuck, The Open University
Theresa Lillis, The Open University
Moderators
Jackie Tuck, The Open University
Laura Mccambridge, University Teacher, University Of Jyväskylä
Theresa Lillis, The Open University
Rosmawati AILA VOLUNTEER, Postdoctoral Researcher, The University Of Sydney
Institutions play a hugely significant role in shaping literacy practices, with consequences for individuals, organisations and wider society. A concern with institutional context has enabled researchers to focus on literacies within domains of power, to substantiate a critique of the vested interests shaping policies and working practices, and to raise questions about which literacy practices are institutionally valued. At the same time, current theorisation in literacies research emphasises the need to take account of the fluid nature of literacy which follows from its fundamentally social character, particularly in times of hypermobility and rapid change. Texts, writers and readers constantly move across time and space, shifting between different study, professional and life contexts, in and out of different roles and institutions. Boundaries between these domains are increasingly blurred. This symposium explores emerging questions about how we understand the continuities and discontinuities between different institutional and professional contexts, including academic contexts. Key questions for the symposium: How do writers and readers negotiate the demands of shifting institutional contexts and practices? With what consequences? How do writers, readers and texts move between different academic and professional domains? How best can these shifts be researched and theorized, and how can our understanding be applied?
Collaborative literacy practices across institutional contexts
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Bojana Petric, Birkbeck, University Of London
The inherently social nature of literacies is the most evident in collaborative text production. However, the status of collaborative literacies, the value attached to them, and their regulation vary both across and within institutions. Drawing on data from two contrasting institutional contexts, this talk will explore institutional frames of collaborative text production and their consequences for writers.
The Role of (Inter)Disciplinarity in Thesis Writing in a Context of Institutional Mergers and Internationalisation
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Laura Mccambridge, University Teacher, University Of Jyväskylä
This paper interrogates the concept of (inter)disciplinarity and explores its role in thesis writing in a context of institutional mergers, internationalisation, and the use of English as a medium of instruction (EMI).
Writing text messages – a digital literacy practice in the borderland between the Swedish for immigrants programme and leisure
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Annika Shaswar, Umeå University
This paper explores a digital literacy practice in the borderland between formal education and leisure where an adult L2 learner and his teacher write text messages to each other. In focus are the participants’ purposes of participating and the discoursal construction of identities that takes place as they interact.
Student mental health literacy practices: blurred institutional practice boundaries
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Emily Peach, Lancaster University
Case study data of one central document from the university support system is analysed to demonstrate how it is influenced by both academic and healthcare institutional practices and contexts, demonstrating the blurred boundaries of institutions and discussing the experiences of the students with this document. 
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S015 1/2 | CDST research in the Chinese context
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Yongyan Zheng, Fudan University
Ting Huang AILA Volunteer, AILA2021 Volunteer, Fudan University
Lawrence Jun Zhang, The University Of Auckland
Pengyun Chang, Chongqing University
Jihua Dong, Shandong University
Moderators
Yongyan Zheng, Fudan University
Ting Huang AILA Volunteer, AILA2021 Volunteer, Fudan University
For the past two decades, the Complex Dynamic Systems Theory (CDST) has burgeoned in applied linguistics, especially on second language (L2) development (e.g. complexity, accuracy, fluency) and individual differences (e.g. motivation, working memory, and self-regulatory strategies). The CDST perspective sees language development taking place as individual learners mobilize their linguistic, cognitive, and affective resources to co-adapt to the learning environment, which justifies a balanced view on language learners, learner language, as well as the learning context. In addition to contribution made by U.S.-based scholars and European scholars at the University of Groningen, CDST empirical studies have also thrived in the Chinese context, a context characterized by a large language-learning population in instructed learning environment. However, due to most research is reported in Chinese, little is known to the international academia. The proposed symposium aims to bring forth Chinese scholars' voices in this regard. It opens with a featured presentation on an overview of CDST studies conducted in the Chinese context (including mainland China, Hong Kong, and Macao), followed by two sub-strands, one focusing on Chinese learners' L2 written and oral language development, and the other focusing on the individual differences of Chinese learners engaged in foreign language learning. Timeline S015 1/2 8:30-8:50 Welcome and introduction of our featured speaker8:50-9:30 Yongyan Zheng9:30-10:00 Jihua Dong, Yongyan Zheng10:00-10:30 Lawrence Jun Zhang10:30-11:00 Pengyun Chang11:00-12:00 Discussion of the first block 2/2 14:30-15:00 Yurong Zheng15:00-15:30 Saeed Karimi-Aghdam15:30-16:00 Beilei Wang16:00-17:00 Ting Huang and Discussion of the second block
A systematic review of CDST research in the Chinese context
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yongyan Zheng, Fudan University
This featured presentation begins with a systematic review of published CDST research in the Chinese context and identifies possible future directions. Publications in both international journals and Chinese journals are compared and contrasted in terms of developmental trends, topic distribution, research methods and research design. Then I introduce two particularly promising research methods: Social Network Analysis and Q methodology, and discuss the possibilies of applying these methods in CDST research. Future directions are discussed at the end of the lecture.
The dynamic development of EFL students’ stance construction in students’ academic writing
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Jihua Dong, Shandong University
Yongyan Zheng, Fudan University
This study employs CDST approaches to investigate Chinese EFL students' stance construction in their academic writing over 20-week span. The analysis shows great fluctuations and notable trend along the developmental trajectories of students' stance construction, thus can be useful in enhancing students' stance construction and academic writing skills.
A Complex Dynamic Systems Theory perspective on the Variability in Chinese EFL learners’ Listening development
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Pengyun Chang, Chongqing University
Co-authors :
Lawrence Jun Zhang, The University Of Auckland
This 3-year longitudinal study tracked 3 Chinese EFL undergraduates and analyzed the collected data through CDST techniques, including min-max graphs and Monte-Carlo analyses. Our results confirm flux developmental processes of L2 listening, depict divergent patterns of intra-individual variability and highlights the significance of variability in SLD in the Chinese context.
Idiodynamic research into Chinese EFL learners’ listening motivation based on “Directed Motivational Currents”
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Lawrence Jun Zhang, The University Of Auckland
Co-authors :
Pengyun Chang, Chongqing University
Recent research into L2/FL motivation has entered the socio-dynamics period, characterized by a concern with the contextual interactions, the dynamics of change, and the time-scale variations. We present findings from a longitudinal study into three EFL learners’ listening development over time in relation to the “Directed Motivation Currents”.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S021 1/2 | Collaborative Research in Language Education: reciprocal benefits and challenges
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
David Little, Trinity College Dublin
Jessica Berggren, Stockholm University/City Of Stockholm
Silvia Kunitz, Karlstad University
Malin Haglind, Teacher, Eklidens Skola
Anna Lofquist, Presenter, Järla Skola
Henrik Bøhn, University Of South-Eastern Norway
Anna-Marie Csöregh, PhD Student, Teacher, Stockholm University
Joseph Siegel, Stockholm University
Björn Kindenberg, Stockholm University
Erika Sturk, Umeå University
Gregory Sholdt, Konan University
Tanya Mccarthy, Kyoto University
Fiona Nic Fhionnlaoich, Queen's University Belfast | Maynooth University
Sara Snoder, Stockholm University
Amanda Brown, Syracuse University
Alastair Henry, University West
Batia Laufer, Professor (emerita), University Of Haifa
Camilla Bardel, Moderator S021, Stockholm University
Gabriele Pallotti, University Of Modena And Reggio Emilia
Ingela Finndahl, PhD Student, University Of Gothenburg
Marie Källkvist, Lund University
Suzanne Bogaerds-Hazenberg, Utrecht University
Leah Shepard-Carey, Drake University, Iowa
Moderators
Camilla Bardel, Moderator S021, Stockholm University
Gudrun Erickson, Moderator S021, University Of Gothenburg
Hongying Peng, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
Language Education (LE) at all levels benefits from research in a multitude of ways. Conversely, educational practices and experiences offer fertile ground for research into language learning, teaching and different forms of assessment of language development and use. Considering the two aspects of practice and research, and their interaction, it becomes obvious that research in LE is a reciprocal venture, with mutual benefits for all actors involved, where theory and practice meet and develop, jointly as well as individually. The proposed symposium aims to gather colleagues from different fields of LE with experiences from research that actively involves teachers, teacher educators and students of different ages and various backgrounds. We welcome proposals of presentations of results from research projects that aim at influencing theory and practice of learning, teaching and assessment in substantial and sustainable ways, as well as critical discussions of problematic aspects of collaborative research, for example research ethics. Furthermore, reflections at the conceptual and structural levels, focusing, for example, on theory development as well as on the influence of educational planning in relation to outcomes at local, national, and international levels are of great interest.S021 detailed programme, c
From practice to theory, from classroom to research
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
David Little, Trinity College Dublin
This presentation will report on an Irish primary school that successfully converts extreme linguistic diversity into significant educational capital. It will argue that pupils’ learning achievement illuminates three theoretical constructs – exploratory talk, plurilingual and intercultural education, and learner autonomy – while suggesting possibilities of mutually beneficial collaboration between teachers and researchers.
From monologues to dialogues: Tasks, interaction and collaboration
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Jessica Berggren, Stockholm University/City Of Stockholm
Silvia Kunitz, Karlstad University
Malin Haglind, Teacher, Eklidens Skola
Anna Lofquist, Presenter, Järla Skola
This paper presents the project “From monologues to dialogues”, a collaboration between teachers and researchers. The project addresses the parallel interaction which often characterises pupil-pupil conversation in the language classroom by exploring task design and “good” interaction. The presentation also offers insights from the collaborative process.
Conceptualizing language assessment literacy: A collaborative approach
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Henrik Bøhn, University Of South-Eastern Norway
Co-authors :
Dina Tsagari, Professor, Oslo Metropolitan University
Language assessment literacy (LAL) has been conceptualized in different ways in the research literature. This study has used a qualitative research design to explore how teacher trainers and teachers in Norway understand the construct. The results have important implications for the way the field conceptualizes LAL and for language teaching and learning.
Fairest of them all? Novice teachers developing assessment identity in Swedish EFL classrooms
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Anna-Marie Csöregh, PhD Student, Teacher, Stockholm University
This collaborative project draws on both research and praxis when investigating novice language teachers' beliefs about assessment in English as a foreign language over a period of two years. The findings from survey and focus group data collected over 2.5 years, indicate a number of firm preconceptions related to assessor roles and different spaces for agency connected to the demand on accountability.  
Collaborative Action Research on Notetaking: Simultaneous cycles
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Joseph Siegel, Stockholm University
This presentation describes action research (AR) involving English teachers in Sweden working with a university researcher to problematize notetaking instruction and describes two simultaneous AR cycles: one involving the teachers and their students in their classrooms, and another involving the researcher and the teachers that occurred in teacher development workshops.
Writing for interpretative reading
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Björn Kindenberg, Stockholm University
This presentation of a joint teacher-researcher collaboration focuses on interpretive and reflective reading of fiction, an important part of the Swedish language subject. The aim of the study is to explore powerful pedagogical design principles (Cobb et al., 2003), grounded in teachers’ knowledge of reading instruction.
Discourses of writing across the curriculum in school years 4–6 – a collaborative study with reciprocal benefits and challenges
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Erika Sturk, Umeå University
In this collaborative study we explored the nature of discourses of writing employed in Swedish compulsory school years 4–6, drawing on observation evidence collected by teacher education students. There are benefits as well as constraints in collaborative research of this kind, and these will be discussed during the presentation.
The Quantitative Research Training Project: Professional Development through Collaborative Research
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Gregory Sholdt, Konan University
The presenter reports on a professional development project that helped language teachers in Japan gain knowledge about conducting quantitative research. Teachers conducted a small-scale study on engagement in an extensive reading activity in their own classrooms and collaborated throughout the process during the 2018 academic school year.
Tandem Learning Revisited: Autonomy, Reciprocity and Collaboration
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Tanya Mccarthy, Kyoto University
Co-authors :
Matthew Armstrong, Kyushu University
This study began as a traditional Tandem Learning program, but soon evolved into a project in which learners exchanged scientific research focusing on professional rather than conversational English. The three principles which guided the research were: autonomy, reciprocity, and collaboration. Collaboration through a focus on dialogue became the driving force to facilitate student progress. The researchers hope to meet and share ideas with educators in other learning contexts who are interested implementing non-traditional Tandem Learning Programs.
Children's experiences of learning the Irish language in English-medium primary schools in Ireland
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Fiona Nic Fhionnlaoich, Queen's University Belfast | Maynooth University
The aim of this study was to investigate pupils' experiences of learning the Irish language in English-medium primary schools in Ireland. This presentation will give an overview of the research, where children in first class (7 yrs) and fifth class (11 yrs) were given an opportunity to share their views and experiences using a child-centred methodology. Key findings are summarised and some implications for practice are noted.
If, when and how does multilingualism become a resource for multilingual teacher students?
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sara Snoder, Stockholm University
"Where in your body do you feel your language?" Multilingual teachers' reflections on young pupils' language identity construction
Maximizing Collaborative Potential in Language Education Research: Opportunities and Challenges
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Amanda Brown, Syracuse University
We review differential involvement in a multi-component educational-intervention study, considering factors influencing diverse participation levels in collaborative language education research, including the impact of federal regulations around ethics. We discuss how researchers might ethically approach their often-single chance to optimize research participation by fostering collaboration across disciplinary and authority boundaries.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S028 1/2 | Conversation Analysis and Language Teacher Education
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Olcay Sert, Mälardalen University
Li Li, University Of Exeter
Pınar Topal, Middle East Technical University
Melike Ünal Gezer, TED University
Santoi Wagner, University Of Pennsylvania
Ufuk Balaman, Hacettepe University
Chris Carl Hale, Associate Professor, Akita International University
Carmen Konzett-Firth, University Of Innsbruck
Christine Jacknick, Borough Of Manhattan Community College
Goetz Schwab, Professor Of Applied Linguistics, Ludwigsburg University Of Education
Maaike Pulles, NHL Stenden University Of Applied Sciences
Marta García, University Of Göttingen
Silvia Kunitz, Karlstad University
Moderators
Carmen Konzett-Firth, University Of Innsbruck
Ufuk Balaman, Hacettepe University
Floor Van Den Berg (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
Since the late 1990s, Conversation Analysis (CA) has been used extensively to study second/foreign/additional (L2) classroom discourse, language learning in and through interaction and L2 interactional competence. In the last decade, some individual initiatives have emerged to make this body of research available for L2 teacher education, mainly from two perspectives: 1) teaching fundamental CA principles to L2 teachers so they can use this knowledge for L2 teaching (Wong & Waring 2010) and 2) analyzing teachers' interactional behavior in classrooms with a view to enhancing their "classroom interactional competence" (Walsh 2011; Sert 2015). The interest in the intersection of CA and language teacher education has recently been demonstrated by two new edited CA volumes on language teaching and learning (cf. Kunitz, Markee & Sert 2019; Salaberry & Kunitz 2019) and a special issue on language teacher education in Classroom Discourse (2019). This symposium invites scholars world-wide who have an interest in empirical CA research on L2 language learning and teaching in and beyond classrooms with transferrable outputs for language teacher education. It aims to discuss the needs and challenges of this relatively young field, to find convergences between the current approaches and suggest ways forward for the future.Welcome to Part 1 of the panel, Conversation Analysis and Language Teacher Education co-organized by Carmen Konzett-Firth and Ufuk Balaman. The panel starts with the LIVE featured talk by Olcay Sert. Subsequently, each contribution will primarily be available through the recorded talks which will be followed LIVE Q&A sessions (10 minutes each). Please see the schedule below and leave your questions to the Q&A area on the right hand side of the Dryfta page for a timely management of the Q&A session. Also note that the final 10 minutes of the Coffee Break in the Part 1 of our panel is allocated to the Q&A session for the focused presentation. Feel free to contact me via Chat box or simply e-mail me ubalaman@gmail.comS028/1 SCHEDULE (All given in Europe/Amsterdam time. Please use Dryfta for time conversion):LIVE: 08:30 - 08:40 | Carmen Konzett-Firth & Ufuk Balaman: Panel introductionLIVE: 08:40 - 09:20 | Olcay Sert (Featured): What can Conversation Analysis offer? Teacher learning and digitalization in teacher education in SwedenLIVE: 09:20 - 09:30 |Q & A with SertWATCH: 09:30 - 09:50 | Li Li: Learning to learn together: a video-based collaborative dialogic reflection between a teacher trainee and trainerLIVE: 09:50 - 10:00 | Q & A with LiWATCH: 10:00 - 10:20 | Pınar Topal & Nur Yiğitoğlu Aptoula: Emerging Opportunities for Reciprocal Reflective Practice in Post-Observation ConferencesLIVE: 10:20 - 10:30 | Q & A with Topal & Yiğitoğlu AptoulaWATCH: 10:30 - 11:00 |COFFEE BREAK with Focused Presentation: Melike Ünal Gezer: English Language Teacher Education and Development Through Critical Reflective Practice of Micro-Teaching SessionsLIVE: 10:50 - 11:00 | Focused Presentation Q&A with Ünal GezerWATCH: 11:00 - 11:20 | Santoi Wagner & Kristina Lewis: The interactional interplay between empathy and professional support in teacher-mentor post-observation meetingsLIVE: 11:20 - 11:30 | Q & A with Wagner & LewisWATCH: 11:30 - 11:50 | Chris Carl Hale: Action Research and CA in Language Teacher DevelopmentLIVE: 11:50 - 12:00 | Q & A with HaleWATCH: 12:00 - 12:20 | Ufuk Balaman, Semih Ekin & Fatma Badem-Korkmaz Conversation Analysis for Task Enhanced Virtual Exchange: Implications for Digital Language Teacher EducationLIVE: 12:20-12:30 | Q & A with Balaman, Ekin & Badem-Korkmaz
What can Conversation Analysis offer? Teacher learning and digitalization in teacher education in Sweden
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Olcay Sert, Mälardalen University
In this talk I show how Conversation Analysis contributes to teacher education (1) with its role in creating flexible digital observation tools as well as (2) its power in the analysis of pedagogical interactions. Issues related to the analysis of teacher learning and developing sustainable teacher education will be discussed.
Learning to learn together: a video-based collaborative dialogic reflection between a teacher trainee and trainer
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Li Li, University Of Exeter
This talk argues that professional learning is a dialogic process in which new understandings and intersubjectivity are mediated by language. Adopting applied CA, I examine video-based collaborative dialogic reflections between a trainee and a trainer to see how learning is facilitated and achieved, and new understanding is scaffolded and mediated.
The Tide Between Reflection and Evaluation in Video-Mediated Post-Observation Conversations
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Pınar Topal, Middle East Technical University
Co-authors :
Nur Yiğitoğlu Aptoula, Boğaziçi University
Our study examines video-mediated post-observation conferences emerging as a fundamental support for evidence-based reflective practices in teacher education. The analysis reveals that fluctuations in epistemic (a)symmetries between mentor and trainees serve as a catalyst for the progression of reflection and evaluation-oriented sequences.
English Language Teacher Education and Development Through Critical Reflective Practice of Micro-Teaching Sessions
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Melike Ünal Gezer, TED University
The present study aims to validate the function of reflections in the education of PTs and highlight the importance of multi-source reflections on microteaching practices of PTs: a tripartite reflection- from the PTs themselves, the peers, and the course instructor on ELT micro-teaching sessions.
The interactional interplay between empathy and professional support in teacher-mentor post-observation meetings
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Santoi Wagner, University Of Pennsylvania
Co-authors :
Kristina Lewis, University Of Pennsylvania
This study examines the interplay between demonstrating professional and emotional support within teacher-mentor post-observation meetings in language teacher education. Attending to these two aspects of mentoring practice can help teachers learn to navigate the emotional practice of teaching and help mentors recognize emotion as an affordance for professional development.
Action Research and CA in Language Teacher Development
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Chris Carl Hale, Associate Professor, Akita International University
This presentation will provide an intuitive and accessible framework for bridging the personal and professional benefits of action research with the illustrative power of CA.
Conversation Analysis for Task Enhanced Virtual Exchange: Implications for Digital Language Teacher Education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Ufuk Balaman, Hacettepe University
Co-authors :
Semih Ekin, Hacettepe University
Fatma Badem-Korkmaz, Hacettepe University
We describe the procedural unfolding of the telecollaborative tasks by analyzing (i) pre-service teachers' collaborative design meetings (ii) written design reports; (iii) peer and mentor evaluation of these design ideas in whole-class feedback sessions in teacher training classrooms; (iv) written reports of redesigns after the feedback session, (v) video-mediated implementation by telecollaborative task participants, and finally (vi) pre-service teachers' written reflections based on the implementation of their own designs. We use Conversation Analysis to  examine text/audio/video data and data to present the procedural unfolding of two tasks over multiple phases, namely design, feedback, implementation, and reflection.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S043 | Embracing Plurilingual and Intercultural Education in the Arabian Peninsula and other English as a Medium of Instruction (EMI) Contexts
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Hanada Taha Thomure, Zayed University
Ali Alsaawi, Assistant Professor, Majmaah University
Mick King, Assistant Professor, Community College Of Qatar
Glenda El Gamal, Khalifa University
Fatma Said , Assistant Professor In Applied Linguistics , Zayed University, UAE
Telma Steinhagen, Symposium Organizer, Presenter, Zayed University
Sarah Hopkyns, Presenter And Symposium Organizer, Zayed University
Tanya Tercero, Curriculum Developer, Defense Security Cooperation University
Sara Hillman, Texas A&M University At Qatar
Melanie VandenHoven, Lead Cross Cultural Communication Specialist, Nawah
Kay Gallagher, Symposium Discussant , Zayed University
Moderators
Telma Steinhagen, Symposium Organizer, Presenter, Zayed University
Sarah Hopkyns, Presenter And Symposium Organizer, Zayed University
Kay Gallagher, Symposium Discussant , Zayed University
Joanna Porkert , AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
This symposium, organized by Telma Steinhagen and Sarah Hopkyns, examines the dynamic and linguistically diverse context of the United Arab Emirates where English is the medium of instruction and Arabic is the official language. There is a serious concern over Arabic attrition which is regularly voiced in both scholarly and public discourse as well as the media. In a society where English is considered the language of economic advancement and Arabic a strong marker of cultural identity and heritage, there is an urgent need to support systematic plurilingualism at all levels of education. Each paper in this symposium will aim to address specific dilemmas caused by fast paced modernization and "Englishization" on the one hand and the need to promote Arabic on the other. The predominant monolingual habitus in educational institutions and strict English only policies in the region makes the implementation of any plurilingual pedagogy a challenge. Featured speaker, Hanada Taha Thomure, who is the Chair of the Arabic Department at Zayed University in the United Arab Emirates, will discuss factors contributing towards Arabic attrition and possible solutions to the many linguistic challenges faced in Gulf education. Many of the issues discussed are also relevant to other EMI contexts globally. Other presenters in this symposium will share data from empirical studies and discuss the implications for a plurilingual turn in research and education. They will suggest ways in which learners can use their linguistic repertoires to better facilitate learning and identity investment.
Choosing the Right Drivers when reforming Education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Hanada Taha Thomure, Zayed University
The Arabian Gulf by virtue of its demographic composition is a pluralistic society, where many languages and cultures live side by side and interact. This linguistic richness, however, carries its own challenges within it. One main challenge has to do with Arabic language which is the official language of the land.  This session will discuss the UAE vision & initiatives set in place to develop Arabic language education. The initiatives are to be appluaded, however, the direction of the linguistic vision needs to be adjusted to focus more on teacher preparation and teacher and school leadership training.
Content teacher perspectives on Arabic usage in EMI environments in the UAE federal tertiary sector
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Mick King, Assistant Professor, Community College Of Qatar
This presentation considers research into content teacher views on the use of Arabic within English medium of instruction (EMI) environments in the UAE federal tertiary sector. Findings suggest that Arabic must have a place in the research context for both learning and preparation for students’ future employment.
Bridging Policy and Practice: Embracing Translingual Practice in Emirati Higher Education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sarah Hopkyns, Presenter And Symposium Organizer, Zayed University
Translingual practice is the norm in plurilingual contexts such as the United Arab Emirates. However, this is not reflected in educational policy. This presentation explores 100 Emirati university students’ language use, ideologies, and perspectives on English medium instruction. Ways to combat dominant ‘double monolingual’ ideologies in the region are suggested.
Exploring cultural intersections for undergraduate scientists and engineers studying at an EMI institution: a UAE perspective.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Glenda El Gamal, Khalifa University
This study investigates the effects of a intercultural competence course that endeavours to cultivate intercultural sensitivity in Emirati engineering students at an EMI university, in the UAE. An exploratory sequential research design using multiple measurements was used. Recommendations will be made for future research with particular reference to language and identity.
English as the Medium of Instruction in UAE: A critical discourse analysis of the Media 'Debate'
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Tanya Tercero, Curriculum Developer, Defense Security Cooperation University
From 2010-Present, The National, an Emirati English-language newspaper, has published dozens of Education articles, Opinion and Comment pieces, and Letters-to-the-Editor on the ‘debate’ of Arabic versus English as a medium of instruction in its government-sponsored schools and universities. This media debate centers around the use of and attitudes towards Arabic and English not only in education, but in their roles in national identity, religion, modernization, and globalization. The aim of this paper is to present results of a critical discourse analysis that analyzes the language of the media debate in order to discover how the 'interests' of the Emiratis and foreign nationals living, working and studying in the UAE are “represented, helped, or harmed” (Gee 2014) as a result of language policies in education.
Plurilingualism and Monolingualism in Foreign Language Classrooms
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Ali Alsaawi, Assistant Professor, Majmaah University
Dr Ali Alsaawi is an Assistant Professor at Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia. He holds a PhD in Applied Linguistics from Newcastle University in the UK. His research interests include sociolinguistics, bilingualism and second language acquisition.
Fear, anxiety and confusion over the future of Arabic: Is a plurilingual education the answer?
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Fatma Said , Assistant Professor In Applied Linguistics , Zayed University, UAE
The sociolinguistic paper reports on Arabic speakers' perceptions of the future of their language in the context of the ever-growing importance of English. The paper questions whether and how effective a plurilingual education would help change perceptions and anxieties about their languages by offering students the opportunity to be proficient in both languages.
English-medium policies and linguistic repertoires in Arabic and English
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Melanie VandenHoven, Lead Cross Cultural Communication Specialist, Nawah
The use of English as a medium of instruction in the United Arab Emirates has generated debate about the place of English in an otherwise Arabic-speaking region.  This ethnographic study, conducted during the 2010-2017 era of the Abu Dhabi Educational Council with a policy of biliteracy in government schools, investigates the accounts of sixteen Emirati students from an English-medium teacher-training college to learn when and where they favoured Arabic and English. This presentation highlights findings shows fluid conversational practices which challenge assumptions that English use threatens Arabic, Islam, and the cultural identity in this Gulf context.
Emirati Students’ Perceptions on Plurilingual Education: The Discovery of New Categories
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Telma Steinhagen, Symposium Organizer, Presenter, Zayed University
Use of a Grounded Theory research method when coding data on translanguaging in class brought to light new categories that are specific to the social and educational context of the United Arab Emirates. The presenter will introduce these and make tentative suggestions about how plurilingual education can change students’ perceptions on monolingual habitus in an educational context in the UAE.
S043 | summary of the talks
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kay Gallagher, Symposium Discussant , Zayed University
Summary of the talks 
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S049 1/2 | English medium education in multilingual university settings: from research to policies
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Kristina Hultgren, The Open Universtity
Masakazu Iino, Waseda University
Kumiko Murata, Waseda University
Masako Kumazawa, J. F. Oberlin University
Maryna Reyneke, North-West University
Kotie Kaiser, Senior Lecturer In The School Of Language Education, NWU
Simone Stuers, Affiliated Researcher, The Open University
Amanda Wallace, PhD Candidate , Simon Fraser University
Yusuf Cengiz, PhD Student, Boğaziçi University
Yasemin Bayyurt, Bogazici Universitesi
Michelle Hunter, PhD Student, University Of York
Eun Gyong Kim, Professor, Korea Advanced Institute Of Science And Technology
Soo-Ok Kweon, Pohang Univ. Of Science & Technology
Jeongyeon Kim, Ulsan National Institute Of Science And Technology
Josefina Santana, Professor-Researcher, Univerrsidad Panamericana
Caroline Clark, President University Language Centre, University Of Padova
Camilla Falk Rønne Nissen, University Of Copenhagen
Christa Van Der Walt, Presenter, Stellenbosch University
Dogan Yuksel, Associate Professor, Kocaeli University
Antonio Jimenez-Munoz, Lecturer In English, University Of Oviedo
Michelle Mellion, English Language Consultant , Radboud University
Nils Olov Fors, Kanda University Of International Studies
Pat Moore, Pablo De Olavide University
Ute Smit, Professor, University Of Vienna
Moderators
Emma Dafouz, Symposium Co-chair, Complutense University
Ute Smit, Professor, University Of Vienna
Saskia Nijmeijer, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Medical Center Groningen
With the internationalisation of higher education (HE) in full swing, a large number of HE institutions world-wide offer localised forms of English-medium education (EME) for parts of their study programmes. Given the diversity of these multilingual educational settings, such language policies are complex in themselves. Following Spolsky (2004), policies combine (a) regulations taken explicitly or implicitly at various levels from supra-national bodies to university departments, (b) language practices enacted, for instance, in classrooms or institutional meetings, and (c) the beliefs stakeholders hold about English and other relevant languages used for diverse communicational purposes. Concurrently, these multilingual educational realities have attracted a considerable amount of applied linguistic research, investigating, for instance, teaching and learning practices, participant ideas and wider institutional developments. What is still largely missing, however, is that research directly inform policy development and implementation. Despite ample studies, English-medium education policies are often still developed without benefitting to the full from situated and evidence-based findings. It is the aim of this symposium to foreground the potential that research holds for EME policy development and to place centre-stage cases where EME research has had an impact on relevant policies, whether regulation, belief or practice at a macro, meso or micro level.S049 detailed programme, click here
Conceptualising the researcher as policy adviser in a post-truth era
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kristina Hultgren, The Open Universtity
With the rise of English Medium Education continuing, calls are being made for research to inform policy. This talk sets out to ponder some of the challenges and complexities involved in this endeavour and concludes by proposing four possible ways of conceptualising the researcher as policy adviser.
Language policies and practices of MME (Multilingual-Medium Education) in Japanese higher education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Masakazu Iino, Waseda University
Kumiko Murata, Waseda University
This presentation introduces an EMI program, which was initially associated with “English-Only”, but has recently put more emphasis on multilingual aspects with new study plans, including study-abroad programs in non-Inner-Circle countries. It discusses both the potential of such programs for the provision of an ELF-informed LPP model and their sustainability.
Benefits and risks of EMI: Students’ perception in a university EMI program in Japan
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Masako Kumazawa, J. F. Oberlin University
English as a medium of instruction (EMI) has become a new normal at universities across the globe. This presentation reports findings from a study within the Japanese context, where various pedagogical issues have emerged concerning students' learning outcomes despite the stakeholders' unfounded assumptions about EMI's benefits. This presentation addresses the issue of the two contradictory sides of EMI, benefits and risks, by investigating how these are perceived by students through a questionnaire and interviews. A preliminary analysis of the data will present issues surrounding EMI from students' perspective and address the need to render support and guidance for them.
Making sense of living in the tower of Babel
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Maryna Reyneke, North-West University
Kotie Kaiser, Senior Lecturer In The School Of Language Education, NWU
This paper will explain how design-based research was used to design and implement the short course on training lecturers across faculties in applying multilingual pedagogies at a university in South Africa. Preliminary results on the lecturers’ awareness of and attitudes towards the application of these pedagogies will also be discussed.
Access to and experience of English-medium instruction in higher education in Germany: A study into English language entry requirements
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Simone Stuers, Affiliated Researcher, The Open University
My study investigated the usage, role and perceived relevance of English language entry requirements for English-medium programmes at higher education level in Germany. Websites of over four hundred German universities and polytechnics were analysed; students and programme leaders were surveyed as well as the relevant ministry on state level. The results were partially surprising.
Interdisciplinary collaborations in support of multilingual students at an Anglo-dominant Canadian university: Examining the implications for institutional language policies
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Amanda Wallace, PhD Candidate , Simon Fraser University
This paper focuses on the English language support practices at a Canadian university. It highlights findings related to the processes that shape interdisciplinary collaborations for the purpose of developing discipline-specific language and literacy support at the curricular core and discusses the study’s implications for language policies in Anglo-dominant university settings.
An Evaluation of a University-Based Intensive English Program: Insights of Students and Teachers
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yusuf Cengiz, PhD Student, Boğaziçi University
Yasemin Bayyurt, Bogazici Universitesi
This study investigates the implementation of an intensive English program. The data obtained through semi-structured interviews and focus group studies reveal the way the program is implemented, its weaknesses and strengths. The data reveals the way that the program is received by the students. Several improvements are suggested.
Affect arising from English Medium Instruction: student coping strategies to inform policy development and implementation
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Michelle Hunter, PhD Student, University Of York
Affect is a highly contested term extending beyond “emotions”. This talk focuses on affective dimensions experienced by, and subsequently managed by multilingual students. The premise is that with knowledge of affective learning strategies, stakeholders from policy developers to teachers can tailor EMI courses to better meet student needs.
Future directions of EMI at Korean science and engineering schools
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Soo-Ok Kweon, Pohang Univ. Of Science & Technology
Jeongyeon Kim, Ulsan National Institute Of Science And Technology
Co-authors :
Eun Gyong Kim, Professor, Korea Advanced Institute Of Science And Technology
This study examines perceptions of professors and students on EMI policies at three Korean universities. Results show that the majorities of the professors and students were involved in EMI due to their university's policy and that they felt lower satisfaction and less interaction than in classes of Korean-medium instruction.
Establishing teacher-student rapport in an English medium instruction class
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Josefina Santana, Professor-Researcher, Univerrsidad Panamericana
One challenge in EMI courses is developing teacher-student rapport. Rapport leads to improved student engagement and academic performance. This study compared two groups where teacher and materials were the same for both groups; the only difference was the language of instruction. Findings suggest rapport is possible, regardless of the language.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S066 1/2 | International perspectives on educational models for newly immigrated (refugee) children, adolescents, and young adults: Options, challenges & best practices
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Nicole Marx, University Of Cologne
Mette Christensen, Senior Associate Professor, VIA University College
Line Møller Daugaard, Senior Associate Professor, VIA University College
Till Woerfel, University Of Cologne
Martha Höfler, University Of Cologne
Dorotheé Steinbock, Academic Staff, University Of Potsdam
Jana Gamper
Jinyoung Choi, Researcher, Luxembourg Multi-LEARN Institute
Moderators
Karin Madlener-Charpentier, University Of Basel, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Nicole Schumacher, Mentor, Humboldt University Of Berlin
Andrea Ender, University Of Salzburg
Laura Nap (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer, NHL Stenden University Of Applied Siences
Educational systems all over the world face the challenges of migration, diversity, and multilingualism. How can educational needs of refugees as well as newly immigrated children, adolescents, and young adults in general be met in order to provide longer-term opportunities of integration and participation? Which types of educational models have been devised for different age groups and for newcomers with varying pre-migration schooling experiences, and how successfully? Which are the major challenges for language acquisition and content teaching? For instance, how can the teaching of subject matters be introduced such that content teaching provides opportunities for language learning even at low proficiency/literacy levels, and how can multiligualism be used as a learning/teaching resource? How can transitions to regular educational programs be scaffolded and continuous language training be ensured? This symposium brings together experts in refugee education, second language learning/teaching research, and multilingualism, focusing on educational options, challenges, best practices, and implications for linguistically diverse classrooms more generally. Strand (1): educational models and challenges, pre-migration schooling, and managing transitions (featured speaker: Prof. Martha Bigelow); strand (2): literacy, academic language proficiency, content and language learning, and heterogeneous classrooms (featured speaker: Prof. Nicole Marx).S066 detailed programme, click here.
Lethargic learners and catastrophic curricula? What SLA research has to say about education for immigrant schoolchildren
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Nicole Marx, University Of Cologne
Teaching immigrant students is no easy feat. Minimal teacher support, lack of curricular guidelines and highly diverse learner groups exacerbate the situation. In my talk, I will discuss newer research on the learning trajectories of immigrant students and then consider curricular models to support their academic language and content development.
Moving on? To what? How? Why? Education of ‘late newcomer’ youth in Denmark
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Mette Christensen, Senior Associate Professor, VIA University College
Line Møller Daugaard, Senior Associate Professor, VIA University College
This paper is based on a qualitative investigation of an educational model targeted at 16-18 year old ‘late newcomers’ designed and implemented by a large Danish municipality. The model involves interaction between basic Danish teaching in reception class and short vocational training courses in agriculture, business, health and mechanics.
Do educational models for immigrant children work? – A systematic review of content and language learning approaches
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Till Woerfel, University Of Cologne
Martha Höfler, University Of Cologne
Co-authors :
Tetyana Vasylyeva, University Of Cologne
Rebekka Wanka, University Of Cologne
Leonie Twente, University Of Cologne
Since the late 1990s, educational models that integrate language and content objectives have received much acclaim. The paper presents results of a large-scale systematic review on the effectiveness of such models in classrooms at primary and secondary school level.
Curricular guidelines for newly arrived students with little or no prior knowledge of German - a comparative overview
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Dorotheé Steinbock, Academic Staff, University Of Potsdam
Jana Gamper
We would like to present a comparative overview of the actual German federal states curricular guidelines for classes with the primary aim of teaching German as a second language (GSL) in regular schools in Germany. The focus is on the following fields i) the integration of the respective curricular guidelines into the core curricular programme of the federal states, ii) a clear specification of the target learner group, iii) formulated expectations in terms of learning objectives and competences and iv) the reflection of research outcomes of GSL in curricula.
Holistic learning activities for young migrants: the case of Luxembourg
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Jinyoung Choi, Researcher, Luxembourg Multi-LEARN Institute
Co-authors :
Natalia Durus, Researcher, Luxembourg Multi-LEARN Institute Asbl
Gudrun Ziegler, President, Luxembourg Multi-LEARN Institute - Http://multi-learn.org
As a case study, this presentation introduces Project LEILU – "Learning to be in the new environment – a holistic approach for youngsters in Luxembourg", which aimed to propose an alternative way of learning, development, and participation of young (forced) migrants by offering six modules of interconnected activities from 2016 to 2019.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S067 | International Perspectives on Social Resources in the Education of Multilingual Students
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Naomi Kurata, Monash University
Avary Carhill-Poza, University Of Massachusetts
Guofang Li, Professor And Canada Research Chair, University Of British Columbia
Wendong Li, University Of Macau
Crissa Stephens, Assistant Professor Of Teaching, Georgetown University
Sandra Zappa-Hollman, University Of British Columbia
Moderators
Avary Carhill-Poza, University Of Massachusetts
Sara Razaghi AILA Volunteer, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
This Symposium is focused on the often-overlooked role of social resources in the education of multilingual students through an international policy lens. Peers, families, community members, teachers, counselors, and others have the ability to support, transform, and extend literacy and language learning in and beyond schools, but policy and practice rarely focus on the power of significant others to drive learning. Bringing together innovative research on how social capital, social networks, and social relations are conceptualized and implemented in language and education policy for multilingual students will provide a necessary space for making connections across national contexts and between policy and practice. Research will draw on sociocultural perspectives and post-structural approaches in conjunction with theories of social networks and social capital to provide a nuanced accounting of the influences of social context on language and literacy learning. Discussion will focus on synthesizing analyses from a diversity of contexts and languages, exploring the policy applications of our research, and extending the research agenda to explicitly address the role of social resources in the education of multilingual students.
The effects of social networks on L2 experiences and motivation in home-country settings
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Naomi Kurata, Monash University
This paper explores how a university student of Japanese in Australia structures her L2 experiences in her social networks and how these experiences are related to her L2 motivation. It particularly focuses on the changes in her social networks, as well as those in her L2 identities over 3.5 years.
Through the Looking Glass: Bilingual Peers in US Language and Education Policy
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Avary Carhill-Poza, University Of Massachusetts
Crissa Stephens, Assistant Professor Of Teaching, Georgetown University
Sandra Zappa-Hollman, University Of British Columbia
An informal conversation between three researchers--Avary Carhill-Poza, Sandra Zappa-Hollman, and Crissa Stephens--about their work on social resources and language policy. Crissa describes a critical ethnography of language policy with mothers of multilingual students and their schools. Sandra talks about individual networks of practice among multilingual students studying abroad.  Avary talks about the social networks of adolescent immigrant students who are learning English in US high schools.
Resource Diversity in Asian Immigrants and Refugees in North America: Implications for Language and Literacy Education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Guofang Li, Professor And Canada Research Chair, University Of British Columbia
The presentation addresses the disparity in language and literacy resources among Asian immigrant and refugee students and its implications for classroom instruction and policy making. Asian immigrants and refugees’ resource inequalities prior to immigration, compounded by assimilationist immigrant language and education policies, continue to shape their post-immigration resource diversity.
The role of social networks in academic socialization: Insights from multilingual students studying abroad in China
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Wendong Li, University Of Macau
This study investigates the academic socialization experience of eight multilingual students studying abroad in China. It addresses how social networks are constructed and negotiated by L2 learners and examines their impacts on academic socialization in the local community.
Mothers are Powerful: Insights on the Advocacy of Multilingual Mothers from a Critical Ethnography of Language Policy
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Crissa Stephens, Assistant Professor Of Teaching, Georgetown University
This study highlights the powerful advocacy of three Latinx mothers on behalf of their multilingual children in the US public education context. Utilizing data from a critical ethnography of language policy, it highlights the ways that the mothers attempt to advocate for equal educational opportunity for their children as well as the reasons this advocacy is not recognized by the school system. Finally, provide policy recommendations so that these powerful social resources may be recognized and centered in multilingual education.
Individual Networks of Practice: Examining the Academic Socialization of Multilingual Students as Socially-mediated Learning.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sandra Zappa-Hollman, University Of British Columbia
In this session I provide a historical overview of how academic literacy research has examined multilingual speakers’ experiences over the last few decades, and offer the concept of “Individual Networks of Practice” (INoP) as a powerful theoretical and methodological construct to investigate socially-mediated learning from an ecological, holistic perspective.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S091 1/4 | Learning through leisure: Informal Second Language Learning in the 21st century
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Geoffrey Sockett, Université De Paris
Denyze TOFFOLI, Symposium Organiser, Mentor, University Of Toulouse
Elisa Ghia, University For Foreigners Of Siena
Camilla De Riso, University Of Pavia
Artem Zadorozhnyy, Education University Of Hong Kong
Antonie Alm, University Of Otago
Lily Schofield, PhD Student, Université De Paris
Meryl Kusyk, Karlsruhe University Of Education
Andreas Bengtsson, Stockholm University
Henriette Arndt, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Lund University
Alexandra Schurz, University Of Vienna
Anastasia Pattemore, University Of Barcelona
Andrew Moffat, University Of Nottingham
Christina Lyrigkou, The Open University
Hongying Peng, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
Miho Inaba, Senior Lecturer In Japanese Language , Cardiff University
Chun Lai, University Of Hong Kong
Liss Kerstin Sylvén, University Of Gothenburg
Marcus Warnby, Stockholm University
Marlene Schwarz, University Of Vienna
Mark Dressman, Khalifa University
Phil Benson, Macquarie University
Pia Sundqvist, University Of Oslo
Stefanie Cajka, University Of Vienna
Kossi Seto Yibokou, Associate Professor (MCF), University Of Lorraine | ATILF Lab
Moderators
Denyze TOFFOLI, Symposium Organiser, Mentor, University Of Toulouse
Henriette Arndt, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Lund University
Marlene Schwarz, University Of Vienna
Meryl Kusyk, Karlsruhe University Of Education
Luisa Valesquez , AILA2021 Volunteer
The last 10 years have seen the birth of a new field within applied linguistics, embracing all sorts of language acquisition outside the classroom. With the rapid development and spread of new technologies, informal language contact has become commonplace for many L2 learners. While this can take many different forms, online contexts are a major driving force because they present L2 learners with unprecedented opportunities for exposure to and use of target language(s) regardless of their physical location. Research on this topic has emerged concurrently from diverse contexts. As a result, a variety of terms have been used to describe it (including Extramural English, Informal Digital Learning of English or Online Informal Learning of English), each of which emphasises particular aspects of the informal practices studied. Early research tended to focus on English as a target language, but more recently research on other languages is becoming more prominent. The purpose of this symposium, organized by Denyze Toffoli and colleagues, is to bring together researchers working on informal L2 practices to engage in critical dialogue about the scope of this field and to share their diverse theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches and findings. Our featured speakers are Geoffrey Sockett, Mark Dressman and Phil Benson.
The Informal Digital Learning of English: Individual Differences and Learning Outcomes
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Geoffrey Sockett, Université De Paris
Research into online learning from informal sources suggests a good deal of variability in learning outcomes. In a complex systems perspective, this paper proposes to explore the significant interactions between individual differences such as learning style and learners’ experience of the outcomes of informal exposure to L2 contents.
Learner profiles and IDLE learning trajectories
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Denyze TOFFOLI, Symposium Organiser, Mentor, University Of Toulouse
This study analyses initial learner profiles, in terms of level in English, learner autonomy, attachment and self-determination, of 35 students, then documents their contacts with IDLE and their progress in English over the 10 months of their first year in higher education, using logbook and classroom observation data.
Does informal mean implicit? Situating informal second language learning in the explicit-implicit discussion
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Meryl Kusyk, Karlsruhe University Of Education
The question of which type(s) of learning would best characterize the cognitive processes at play in an informal second language learning (ISLL) context has not yet been thoroughly explored. This talk provides an overview of four different types of learning (explicit, implicit, incidental and intentional) and subsequently aims to situate some of the main varieties of ISLL (Extramural English, Online Informal Learning of English, out-of-class language learning, et al.) amongst them. 
Measuring Language Usage Outside of the Classroom: A sufficiently precise and practical approach
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Andreas Bengtsson, Stockholm University
In this talk, I propose an approach to measuring out-of-class language use, where language usage is operationalized into fifteen different types of activities, covering all potential target language use. The purpose of this talk is to assist in the work of creating a best-practice for measuring language use, which would have a long-term beneficial effect on research quality in our field.
Informal second language learning — ‘how’ and ‘why’? Exploring the links between engagement, motivation, and attitudes
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Henriette Arndt, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Lund University
A discussion of findings from a longitudinal mixed-methods study, which employed a framework of student engagement to (a) provide deeper insight into the nature of Informal Second Language Learning among secondary school students in Germany (b) explore the reciprocal relationships between informal language contact, motivation, and attitudes towards language learning.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S099 1/3 | Multilingual education or how to learn to teach multilingual learning
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Linda Fisher, University Of Cambridge
Edna Imamovic-Topcic, PhD Researcher / Presenter, University Of Vienna
Ulrike Jessner, University Of Innsbruck
Nadja Kerschhofer-Puhalo, Post-doc Researcher, PI Literacies & Multilingualism Research Group, University Of Vienna
Dina Tsagari, Professor, Oslo Metropolitan University
Mona Evelyn Flognfeldt, Oslo Metropolitan University
Lynell Chvala, Oslo Metropolitan University
Therese Tishakov, Oslo Metropolitan University
Kirstin Reed, Researcher, Oslo Metropolitan University
Margareta Strasser, Head, Language Centre, University Of Salzburg
Christina Reissner, Saarland University
Elisabeth Allgaeuer, Member Of The DyME Research Team (Dynamics Of Multilingualism With English), Innsbruck University
Orly Haim, Pedagogical Advisor, Chair Of The Council Of The Faculty Of Education (Beit Berl College), Beit Berl College; Tel Aviv University, Israel
Moderators
Eva Vetter, Mentor, University Of Vienna
Nikolay Slavkov, University Of Ottawa
Marita Everhardt (AILA2021 Volunteer), PhD Student, University Of Groningen / University Medical Center Groningen
Around the world multilingual learning arrangements have evolved over several decades with the aim of enhancing equity in education. More recently a growing body of research has not only produced a myriad of concepts (plurilingualism, translanguaging, metro-, poly- and other -lingualisms) but also valuable insights into the complexities of multilingual learning and teaching, coupled with calls for continuous pedagogical, institutional, and technological innovation to address these complexities. The significant contributions, changing roles, and professional development of teachers have also recently come to the forefront. At the same time, statistics indicate that plurilingual learners face more obstacles for their academic success than those who are categorized as monolingual students (OECD, 2018). This symposium addresses multilingual teaching, learning and innovation as relevant challenges for Applied Linguistics connecting research from different fields within the discipline. Two sub-themes are proposed: 1) teaching and learning for/in multilingual contexts; and 2) teacher education. Sub-theme one raises questions about facets of multilingual learning and teaching and addresses e.g. biographical, discursive and contextual aspects. Sub-theme two focuses upon teaching competence and its development and asks how teacher beliefs, perceptions and attitudes influence learning to teach in and for multilingual contexts.S099 detailed programme, click here
Participative multilingual identity education: the influence of an identity-based pedagogy on promoting multilingual learning
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Linda Fisher, University Of Cambridge
Co-authors :
Karen Forbes, Senior Lecturer In Second Language Education, University Of Cambridge
A theorised framework for participative multilingual identity education is introduced, where the languages classroom is construed as a key site for identity development and the teacher as a change agent. Findings from empirical study in English secondary schools are presented, considering the effects on students’ identifications and perceptions of language learning.
UNDERSTANDING PATHWAYS. Multilingual Students’ Perspective on Decisions during Educational Transition
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Edna Imamovic-Topcic, PhD Researcher / Presenter, University Of Vienna
The presentation includes first findings from a grounded theory project (Charmaz 2014) which investigates experiences of multilingual adolescents living in urban Austrian areas and who find themselves in a period of educational transformation. Preliminary findings suggest that decision-processes are intertwined with multiple contextual themes.
Metacognition in multilingual learning and teaching
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Ulrike Jessner, University Of Innsbruck
Metacognition has been increasingly discussed as one of the main features of learning. In the DMM it is argued that multilinguals develop increased knowledge of languages and language learning through experience. In this presentation a DSCT perspective on multilingual learning and teaching with a focus on metacognition will be presented.
Language learning and investment between school, families, communities and peers – the child’s perspective
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Nadja Kerschhofer-Puhalo, Post-doc Researcher, PI Literacies & Multilingualism Research Group, University Of Vienna
This paper presents results of the project My Literacies on children’s attitudes and investment in language and literacy learning in school and out-of-school contexts. The interpretation of visual products (photos, drawings) and conversational data shows the children’s ambivalent emotions towards multilingualism as a result of discourse and institutional practices.
Teacher and learner beliefs and perceptions in multilingual ELF contexts as basis for continuing professional development of teachers
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Mona Evelyn Flognfeldt, Oslo Metropolitan University
Dina Tsagari, Professor, Oslo Metropolitan University
Therese Tishakov, Oslo Metropolitan University
Lynell Chvala, Oslo Metropolitan University
Kirstin Reed, Researcher, Oslo Metropolitan University
The presentation reports findings of a needs analysis study among teachers and learners of English in Norway, used to develop a high-quality international Continuing Professional Development infrastructure which promotes teacher competences in multilingual pedagogy and empower ELTs to integrate the current role of ELF in multilingual classrooms.
EVAL-IC: A framework of reference for intercomprehension competences
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Margareta Strasser, Head, Language Centre, University Of Salzburg
Christina Reissner, Saarland University
In our contribution, we will present the framework of reference for intercomprehension developed within the European project EVAL-IC (Evaluation des compétences en intercompréhension, Erasmus+). The framework provides descriptors for receptive intercomprehension, interproduction and interactive intercomprehension. 
Educating teachers towards multilingual learning: The 5 Building Blocks of Holistic (Language) Education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Elisabeth Allgaeuer, Member Of The DyME Research Team (Dynamics Of Multilingualism With English), Innsbruck University
The contribution explains the 5 Building Blocks of Holistic (Language) Education concept developed in Vorarlberg/Austria, connecting recent research on multilingual development from a dynamic systems and complexity theory perspective with the five interconnected domains defined in this holistic teaching approach. The presentation closes with recommendations for teacher training courses.
The Induction Period of Bilingual and Multilingual EFL Teachers: A Plurilingual Lens
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Orly Haim, Pedagogical Advisor, Chair Of The Council Of The Faculty Of Education (Beit Berl College), Beit Berl College; Tel Aviv University, Israel
Co-authors :
Lily Orland , Dean Of The Graduate Programs, Haifa University
This study investigates the role EFL teachers attribute to their linguistic and cultural repertoire during induction. Thirty novice bilingual and multilingual teachers in Israeli schools were interviewed. Qualitative analyses reveal themes related to teachers’ plurilingual and cultural background as interwoven with cognitive, practical and personal dimensions of their professional role and identity construction.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S129 | ReN: CLIL Pedagogy and Greater Fairness, Equity and Inclusion
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Francisco Lorenzo, Speaker, Pablo De Olavide University
Rick De Graaff, Mentor ; Coordinator Of Symposium S084, Utrecht University | UAS Utrecht
Kim Bower, Professor Of Innovation In Languages Education, Sheffield Hallam University
Natalia Evnitskaya, Lecturer In TEFL, Universitat Internacional De Catalunya
Igone Arteagoitia, Center For Applied Linguistics
Xavier Martin-Rubió, University Of Lleida
Adrián Granados, Pablo De Olavide University
Elisa Ana Hidalgo Mccabe, Universidad Complutense De Madrid
Ana Llinares, Autonomous University Of Madrid
Moderators
Ana Llinares, Autonomous University Of Madrid
Letizia Cinganotto, INDIRE
Russell Cross, University Of Melbourne
For 2018-2020, the AILA CLIL ReN has focused on 'pedagogy' as research theme, including specific sub-themes that have addressed CLIL as an instructional practice (e.g., CLIL symposium at AFMLTA 2019), CLIL and instructional media (e.g. CLIL, learning technologies and innovation conference, La Tuscia University 2019), and CLIL within multilingual spaces (e.g. CLIL Conference at Sheffield Hallam 2019). This AILA symposium brings into focus the fourth related sub-theme: CLIL and Social Justice. We seek to explore and understand how CLIL might have the potential to contribute to greater equity and access to quality educational provision, with attention to the integrated learning of languages and content. In turn, we would also like to address possible cases of inequity where programs stream students on the basis of their language proficiency and where cognitive and general academic proficiency may also play a role. We understand this aim of social inclusion (or exclusion) broadly, with the potential to include both theoretical and empirical papers that engage with issues of CLIL and class, gender, sexuality, race, cultural and/or linguistic background, and/or special learning needs. Our key point is that CLIL should develop a critical awareness of its impact on its learners and contexts.
CLIL4All: integrating content and language to engage and support all learners
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Rick De Graaff, Mentor ; Coordinator Of Symposium S084, Utrecht University | UAS Utrecht
CLIL has been claimed to be a pedagogy that supports all learners irrespective of their academic and linguistic background. I will address the pros and cons of this claim based on evidence from relevant empirical studies. Connections will be made to language-oriented content teaching and content-based language teaching in L1 and L2.
CLIL for all? Overcoming obstacles while striving for inclusion at a state-funded high-school in Catalonia
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Xavier Martin-Rubió, University Of Lleida
After initially streaming groups who would take content subject in English, the pedagogical team of ‘INS Josep Lladonosa’ decided to prioritise inclusion; they created heterogenous groups and all the them take CLIL subjects. Findings from a questionnaire suggest students with the lowest levels find the subjects challenging.
Socioeconomic status and bilingual competence in monolingual Southern Europe: egalitarian effects of Content and Language Integrated Learning
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Adrián Granados, Pablo De Olavide University
Francisco Lorenzo, Speaker, Pablo De Olavide University
Our study measured the correlation between socioeconomic status and performance in CLIL and non-CLIL education in Andalusia, southern Spain. Unlike in other educational contexts, CLIL seems to contribute to greater equity, as it eliminates the weight that socioeconomic status has on student performance.
Classroom interaction in CLIL programs: offering opportunities or fostering inequalities?
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Natalia Evnitskaya, Lecturer In TEFL, Universitat Internacional De Catalunya
Co-authors :
Ana Llinares, Autonomous University Of Madrid
This study investigates potential inequalities in CLIL programs where students are streamed into two strands based on their L2 proficiency. We compare the distribution of classroom registers, appraisal resources and pedagogical purposes when the same teachers teach the same content in both strands.
The role of streaming in CLIL: a critical examination
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Elisa Ana Hidalgo Mccabe, Universidad Complutense De Madrid
The paper outlines the potential effects of streaming on inequity in the context of bilingual education in Madrid. The study presents ethnographic data gathered mainly from interviews with key stakeholders on students’ transition from primary to secondary and their placement in one of two CLIL strands (High- or Low-Exposure).
CLIL in Anglophone contexts: applications for inclusion
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kim Bower, Professor Of Innovation In Languages Education, Sheffield Hallam University
This presentation considers the potential of Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) to contribute to the equitable provision of high-quality learning in Anglophone contexts by considering why and how the CLIL pedagogical approach might be drawn on to promote multilingual progression in EAL/D and multilingual classrooms.
Equity in Representing Literacy Growth in Dual Language Immersion for Emerging Bilingual Students
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Igone Arteagoitia, Center For Applied Linguistics
This study sheds light on how minority and majority language students in dual language immersion programs in one U.S. state are developing their biliteracy skills so that their academic needs can best be met and inequities originating from a sole focus on English assessment data can be identified and addressed.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S137 | ReN: Investigating the dynamic nature of individual differences in L2 learning
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Laura Gurzynski-Weiss, Indiana University
Tammy Gregersen, American University Of Sharjah
Amy Thompson, West Virginia University
Marta Del Pozo Beamud, University Of Castilla–La Mancha
Giulia Sulis, University Of Graz
Anna Mystkowska-Wiertelak, Associate Professor, Wroclaw University
Jakub Bielak, Adam Mickiewicz University
Daniel Jung, PhD Candidate, University Of Indianapolis
Moderators
Laura Gurzynski-Weiss, Indiana University
Mohamed Salama, PhD Student (Moderator), University Of Groningen
While there is remarkable agreement that some individual differences (IDs) are more dynamic than others (e.g., motivation as compared to working memory), there is a critical gap as how to investigate this important question, particularly for those who are newer to the promise of dynamic systems theory or approaching IDs as dynamic with respect to longitudinal design. This symposium will provide robust examples on how we as a field can investigate the dynamic nature of IDs. Specifically, we provide both a sound theoretical discussion of each ID in relationship to its (posited or empirically attested) role(s) in L2 learning, as well as methodological examples on how to best reveal the dynamic nature of IDs. Taken together, the talks in this symposium provide the initial steps towards a continuum of dynamicity. Each paper includes a description of the ID of study (willingness to communicate; anxiety; strategies; L2 self; multilingual self; working memory, etc.) and the role(s) the ID plays in L2 learning before moving on to the heart of the symposium: a discussion on how each ID can change, what influences this change, and, critically, concrete examples of research methods that will allow us to explore the dynamicity of each ID.
S137 | introduction by organizers
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Laura Gurzynski-Weiss, Indiana University
Investigating the dynamic nature of individual differences in L2 learningThis symposium provides robust examples on how we can investigate the dynamic nature of individual differences. We provide both a sound theoretical discussion of each ID in relationship to its role(s) in L2 learning as well as methodological examples on how to best reveal the dynamic nature of IDs.
Anxiety as a Dynamic Individual Difference: Implications for Research and Pedagogy
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Tammy Gregersen, American University Of Sharjah
Language anxiety is a dynamic individual difference forming part of an interconnected, fluctuating system that shifts unpredictably over time and multiple time scales and is effected by perturbations that create a new system based on the previous. Such dynamism implicates necessary changes in both research and pedagogy.
My many selves are still me: Motivational selves and multilingualism
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Amy Thompson, West Virginia University
Two concepts of multilingualism relate to the selves aspect of Dörnyei’s (2009) L2MSS: Thompson’s concept of Perceived Positive Language Interaction (PPLI) and Henry’s notion of the ideal multilingual self. Using multiple data sources, this paper explores the dynamicity of multilingual learners’ language systems and the influences that induce change.
L2 motivation in trainee teachers: Are female undergrads more motivated?
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Marta Del Pozo Beamud, University Of Castilla–La Mancha
The main objective of the study is to determine whether female graduate students are more motivated that their male counterparts (M: 19,5). Said students completed a quantitative questionnaire in class. Results are tentative because the study is still in progress. Nonetheless, female students appear to be more motivated.
Engagement in the L2 classroom: Micro and macro perspectives
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Giulia Sulis, University Of Graz
The present study explores fluctuations in behavioural, emotional, and cognitive engagement over the course of four intact L2 lessons spread over the course of one academic year, and examines the interrelationships between these dimensions and timescales under a situated, dynamic perspective.
Learner engagement in the autonomy-supportive environment
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Anna Mystkowska-Wiertelak, Associate Professor, Wroclaw University
Jakub Bielak, Adam Mickiewicz University
Learner engagement coincides with positive learning outcomes. In this study, we sought to investigate the link between engagement and motivation over a semester. The main objective was to see if increasing learners’ autonomy could enhance their engagement. Questionnaire-based data were juxtaposed with interviews and observations to tap into reasons behind shifts in engagement intensity.
Tracking Spanish L2 learner ID profiles longitudinally: Results from the first year
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Daniel Jung, PhD Candidate, University Of Indianapolis
Laura Gurzynski-Weiss, Indiana University
This study examines the potential dynamicity of motivation, personality, learning and cognitive styles, and working memory over two semesters of Spanish study at the university level. The project contributes to the empirical question surrounding the degree of dynamicity of these learner IDs.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S147 | ReN: Rethinking language policy: the importance of the home in language maintenance and development
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Bernard Spolsky, Professor Emeritus, Bar-Ilan University
Ruth Kircher, Researcher, Mercator European Research Centre On Multilingualism And Language Learning / Fryske Akademy
Elanur Sönmez, Bogaziçi University
Sixuan Wang, University Of New South Wales
Andrea C. Schalley, Symposium Organiser/Moderator (S109 & S147); Presenter, Karlstad University
Susana Eisenchlas, Symposium Organiser/Moderator (S109 & 147)/ Presenter (S147), Griffith University
Sabine Little, University Of Sheffield
Elizabeth Ellis, Adjunct Associate Professor (Applied Linguistics), University Of New England
Fatma Said , Assistant Professor In Applied Linguistics , Zayed University, UAE
Meilute Ramoniene, Vilnius University
Natalia Ringblom, Stockholm University | Dalarna University
Moderators
Andrea C. Schalley, Symposium Organiser/Moderator (S109 & S147); Presenter, Karlstad University
Susana Eisenchlas, Symposium Organiser/Moderator (S109 & 147)/ Presenter (S147), Griffith University
Michelle Mattuzzi (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer
This symposium, organized by the AILA Research Network on Social and Affective Factors in Home Language Maintenance and Development (HOLM ReN), will focus on language policy. While language policies are established and applied at all levels of society, we will pay particular attention to the home as a site where language policies are negotiated and contested, as families are the principal language managers and ultimately responsible for intergenerational language transmission or shift. Papers may examine top-down processes, e.g. how families as micro-level actors react to external macro-level forces, or they may illustrate bottom-up processes, e.g. how home language ideologies and practices might impact more generally on language policy and planning at the macro level. We are particularly interested in the role social and affective factors play in these dynamic processes.
Rethinking language policy: The home and the family
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Bernard Spolsky, Professor Emeritus, Bar-Ilan University
"Language policy became a field for research when sociolinguists tackled the language problems of nations becoming independent in the 1960s. Classical language policy focused on the nation-state. State policy is often blocked by variations in language policy at other levels,  as well as by factors such as wars, disease, poverty and corruption. Increasing attention has been paid to the home . Starting with the individual  one should consider policy in the home, school, work,  and other  levels, and only then consider national policies. The home is central, but other levels play a significant part in a complex phenomenon.
Intergenerational language transmission in Quebec: Patterns and predictors in the light of provincial language planning
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Ruth Kircher, Researcher, Mercator European Research Centre On Multilingualism And Language Learning / Fryske Akademy
This paper presents a sociolinguistic study conducted among 274 parents of different mother tongues in Quebec, to investigate the patterns and predictors of the intergenerational transmission of French. The paper discusses the implications of the findings for provincial language planning to ensure the maintenance of French in Quebec.
The Effect of Parental Agency in Home Language Policy: The Case of Iranians in Istanbul.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Elanur Sönmez, Bogaziçi University
This paper presents a linguistic ethnographic study focusing on an Iranian lifestyle migrant family living in Istanbul. Data from microethnographic analyses will report on the family’s linguistic practices in Persian, Turkish, and English and how they approach language policy in a domestic setting.
Is the Mother Tongue Still the Mother’s Tongue in Multilingual China? – A Story of the Blang Language
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sixuan Wang, University Of New South Wales
This work investigated the patterns of language maintenance and shift in the Blang speech community with a particular focus on the family domain. The findings contribute to the current understanding of LMS in the family domain by highlighting the interaction between different social actors in the family unit.
Back and Forth: Sojourning as an organised family language management strategy
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Andrea C. Schalley, Symposium Organiser/Moderator (S109 & S147); Presenter, Karlstad University
Susana Eisenchlas, Symposium Organiser/Moderator (S109 & 147)/ Presenter (S147), Griffith University
Co-authors :
Pei-Shu Tsai, National Changhua University Of Education
Grace Yue Qi, Lecturer , Massey University
This study investigates the experiences of Australian Taiwanese-background parents and children, who sojourn to the parents’ homeland during school holidays to improve their linguistic and cultural skills. We explore outcomes of this language management activity, focusing on the mothers’ aims and children’s linguistic development and their identity formation.
Through the child's eye: collaborative family language policy development
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sabine Little, University Of Sheffield
Toby Little
This presentation reports on a 2.5 auto-ethnographic study where mother and son (aged 6.6-9 throughout the study) jointly researched their language practices and attitudes towards German and English in the home. The session will be co-presented by both parent and child (aged 13 at time of conference)
A hyphenated belonging: Parental linguistic identity shaping plurilingual family language policy
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Elizabeth Ellis, Adjunct Associate Professor (Applied Linguistics), University Of New England
Co-authors :
Margaret Sims, Adjunct Professor, Macquarie University
Vicki Knox, Principal Research Assistant, University Of New England
This paper presents a case study of linguistic identities within a Korean / Gaelic / English-speaking family, drawn from a larger study of isolated intermarried families in regional areas of NSW, Australia. The connection between parental linguistic identity and family language policy is explored.
Family Language Policies of Saudi Student Families in the UK: the importance of the home environment
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Fatma Said , Assistant Professor In Applied Linguistics , Zayed University, UAE
Co-authors :
Maha Othman, PhD Student, University Of York, UK
Sojourning family, family language policy, Arabic, Bilingualism, parental language ideologies
Family language policy and dialect maintenance in Lithuanian diaspora
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Meilute Ramoniene, Vilnius University
Based on the data of two large scale national research projects funded to investigate the linguistic behaviour and identity in Lithuanian diaspora the paper will deal with the issues of family language policy and dialect maintenance. The paper analyses the data of qualitative in-depth interviews.
On the Possible Interplay of Macro and Micro Level Forces in Family Language Policy: The Example from Three Different Contexts
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Natalia Ringblom, Stockholm University | Dalarna University
Co-authors :
Anastassia Zabrodskaja , Professor Of Intercultural Communication, Tallinn University
This study investigated family language policy (FLP) practices at home among Russian heritage and majority language speakers and their children in Cyprus, Estonia and Sweden. We connect the analysis of top-down discourses on Russian at the national level with an analysis of bottom-up reactions to them based on individual FLPs.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S150 1/3 | ReN: on Early Language Learning
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Claire Goriot, Postdoctoral Researcher, University Of Amsterdam/Wageningen University
Florence Myles, University Of Essex
Victoria Murphy, University Of Oxford
Maria Nilsson, Stockholm University
Anne-Marie Morgan, University Of New England
Claudia Seele, Project Manager, RAA Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
Claudine Kirsch, Researcher, Lecturer, University Of Luxembourg
Eva Wilden, University Of Duisburg-Essen
Heather Hilton, Convenor, Symposium 150 On Early Language Learning (AILA REN), Lumière University Lyon 2
Jana Roos, University Of Potsdam
Kaisa Hahl, University Of Helsinki
Karoline Wirbatz, TU Dortmund
Laura De Ruiter, Tufts University | PACE Research Institute
Marie-Pierre Jouannaud, University Of Grenoble
Mila Schwartz, Head Of The Research Authority , Oranim Academic College Of Education
Nils Jaekel, University Of Oulu
Outi Veivo, University Of Turku
Renata Šamo, Vice-Dean For Research And International Cooperation; Head Of The English Department, Juraj Dobrila University Of Pula, Faculty Of Humanities
Sarah Sturm, Technical University Of Braunschweig
Tanja Samulin, University Of Helsinki
Moderators
Heather Hilton, Convenor, Symposium 150 On Early Language Learning (AILA REN), Lumière University Lyon 2
Eva Wilden, University Of Duisburg-Essen
Andre Korporaal (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer
The Early Language Learning Research Network has organized a Symposium at the past two AILA Congresses (Brisbane in 2014, Rio de Janiero in 2017), a sign of increasing scientific and political interest in language learning in the primary and preschool years. In such a context, a forum for the scientific consideration of the specificities of early language learning (ELL) is vital for teachers, materials designers and policy makers worldwide, and the objective of our AILA Symposia has always been to bring together speakers who can synthesize important work being carried out at regional and national levels, in order to inform policy and practice. The current ELL ReN has identified eight particularly important research strands, which provide the structure for our Symposium proposal: classroom practices for ELL, training teachers for ELL, ELL by multilingual and migrant learners, digital media for ELL, assessment in ELL, learning to read and write in ELL, "early years" instructed language learning (under the age of 6). The ReN strand coordinators have proposed featured speakers who will be presenting high-level studies on these themes, and the ELL Network invites similarly high-level papers to complete these perspectives.
Early language education in the Netherlands
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Claire Goriot, Postdoctoral Researcher, University Of Amsterdam/Wageningen University
Foreign language education in the Netherlands will be discussed from different viewpoints: which languages are taught, what are policy makers’ and educators’ expectations about early foreign language education and are their expectations met? Challenges in foreign language education and possible solutions to improve foreign language education will be covered, too.
Primary languages policy and practice in England: challenges and solutions
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Florence Myles, University Of Essex
A new policy introducing the teaching of a foreign language in primary schools was introduced in 2014 in England. However, the implementation of this policy has encountered major challenges which are reviewed in this paper, before proposing a series of ten research-based recommendations proposing solutions to address them.
The effectiveness of a preschool language intervention designed to promote the transfer of parents’ language supporting skills to novel contexts
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Victoria Murphy, University Of Oxford
We present the findings of a novel parent-focused language intervention aimed at increasing parents’ language supporting strategies in their speech to children. Parents in the intervention group received a programme through a shared wordless picture book activity. Comparisons between pre and post-test scores are discussed identifying its effectiveness.
Foreign language anxiety among future language teachers: dilemmas and possibilities
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Maria Nilsson, Stockholm University
Self-report questionnaire results suggests that primary school generalist teacher students in Sweden experience similar levels of foreign language anxiety as do their future learners. This presentation problematizes the educational challenges of preparing these student teachers to build a positive classroom atmosphere and boost motivation and self-confidence in early language instruction.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S151 1/2 | ReN: Whose taste matters? Authority, meaning, and culture in the linguistics of food
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Lorenza Mondada, University Of Basel
Sally Wiggins, Associate Professor, Linköping University
Amy Van Der Heijden, Wageningen University & Research
Ali-Reza Majlesi, Stockholm University
Cornelia Gerhardt, Saarland University
Sofia Rüdiger, University Of Bayreuth
Hanwool Choe, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University Of Hong Kong
Marie-Louise Brunner, Trier University Of Applied Sciences
Keri Matwick, Lecturer, Nanyang Technological University
Maren Runte, ZHAW Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Moderators
Cornelia Gerhardt, Saarland University
Sally Wiggins, Associate Professor, Linköping University
Mariam Jamureli , AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
This symposium addresses global and cultural challenges within the linguistics of food, focusing on how taste (and other senses) is not simply a property of individuals or of foods, but rather becomes a contested and negotiated concept through lexical and embodied linguistic practices. In short, 'taste' is a fluid concept and has implications not only for the field of linguistics, but also across the sensory and social sciences. The symposium will bring together researchers working in four key areas within the linguistics of food: interactional food assessments, the semantics of taste, consuming identities and global food media. For instance, how might one individual's assessment of food be shared or treated as having greater authority or expertise over another? How are the sensory semantics of taste produced in different contexts: how do linguistic practices overlap with sensory practices? How do producers and consumers negotiate taste as an individual or shared, food-based or culturally-based concept? How do linguistic practices in various forms of digital and print food media become sites in which taste is contested in a globally shifting world? The symposium aims to engage researchers from broad cultural and international backgrounds while focusing on central concepts within the linguistics of food.S151 detailed programme, click here
The intersubjectivity of taste: talk, the senses and the body
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Lorenza Mondada, University Of Basel
Referring to increasing interests in the linguistics of food and the study of sensoriality, the paper proposes an interactional embodied approach of sensory practices. Based on multimodal conversation analysis, it focuses on practices of tasting and expressing taste within activities dealing with food, in restaurants, shops, among amateurs or professionals.
Tasting on behalf of another: non-lexical vocalisations in infant mealtimes
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sally Wiggins, Associate Professor, Linköping University
Co-authors :
Leelo Keevallik, Linköping University
This presentation will examine non-lexical vocalisations (e.g. gustatory mmms, lip smacks) as used in infant mealtimes, examining the ways in which parents use sounds to enact tasting on behalf of another person.
To like or not to like: Negotiating taste in primary school-aged children from families with a lower socioeconomic position
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Amy Van Der Heijden, Wageningen University & Research
This research shows the way in which the concepts of 'taste' and 'liking' are deployed in everyday family mealtime conversations in families with a lower socioeconomic position. The analytic focus is on how primary school-aged children produce (dis)likes of food and how these are understood and treated by their parents.
Assessment in assisted eating activities: The case of supporting people in late-stage dementia
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Ali-Reza Majlesi, Stockholm University
Co-authors :
Anna Ekström, Linköping University
Lars-Christer Hydén, Linköping University
This study deals with assessment practices in talk-in-interaction during assisted eating activities involving people who are in the late-stage of dementia.
Does taste matter? Replacing ingredients in recipes – propositions from vegan food blog commentary
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Cornelia Gerhardt, Saarland University
Food genres such as recipes increasingly contain “no-X constructions” like “no fat” or “sugar free”. This paper will analyse the comment sections of vegan food blogs with regard to such “ex-gredients” focusing on the question how taste is constructed and used as a resource in technologically mediated communication about veganism.
Where food review is the show: Communicating taste and constructing food reviewer identities in Korean and North American mukbang
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Hanwool Choe, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University Of Hong Kong
Sofia Rüdiger, University Of Bayreuth
We analyze Korean livestream and North American pre-recorded mukbang (online eating shows), to see what and how linguistic, interactional, and multimodal resources are used by hosts to evaluate food, and thereby construct their identities as food reviewers. Audience participation also contributes to creating the eaters' identities as food reviewers.
“It tastes even awesomer than it looks!” - Expert identity in computer-mediated food discourses
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Marie-Louise Brunner, Trier University Of Applied Sciences
Expertise is a deciding factor with regard to creating identities in video-mediated food discourse. I analyze the negotiation of expert identities in intercultural Skype conversations and find that two types of expert identities are negotiated: culinary and cultural experts. My results illustrate the complex interrelations between food and expert identity. 
Eating Singapore: (Un) Official Discourses of a National Food Culture
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Keri Matwick, Lecturer, Nanyang Technological University
This study uses the approaches of digital ethnography and presentation of self to analyze Instagram posts of 14-day food diaries by Singaporean university students and interview data. It is inspired by research on culinary nationalism and foodways that views food as a reflection of the self and of the nation.
Semantics of Taste: A Joint Venture of Linguistics and Sensory Science
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Maren Runte, ZHAW Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Jeannette Nuessli Guth, ETH Zürich
Talking about taste takes place in different forms depending on the prior knowledge of the speaker: e.g. sensory science and in everyday life. The talk will focus on two topics: 1. Different means to describe taste perceptions with regard to the different disciplines. 2. Critical issues in translation of sensory descriptors.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S154 | In-service Tertiary FL Teacher Professional Development: Practices & Impacts
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Hong Zhang, National Research Centre For Foreign Language Education
Li Li, University Of Exeter
Tao Feng, Foreign Language Teaching And Research Press
Luna Yang, China Agricultural University
Xiaomei Ma, Xi'an Jiaotong University
Changcheng Duan, Editor, Foreign Language Teaching And Research Press
Moderators
Changcheng Duan, Editor, Foreign Language Teaching And Research Press
Universities, institutions and tertiary foreign language(FL) teachers themselves have attached great importance to teacher professional development(PD). This symposium explores the practices & impacts of different types of in-service tertiary FL Teacher professional development programmes. The studies in this symposium try to answer the following questions: How to plan an FL teacher PD programme focusing on teaching methodology or research competence targeted to a specific group of in-service teachers? How to operate an on-line FL teacher PD community aiming to improve the teachers' teaching competence? And how about an on-line academic community with an objective of enhancing teachers' research competence? What are the effects of such tertiary teacher PD programmes? Both qualitative / quantitative methods are used during the analyses based on various data sources such as reflective journals, questionnaire and interview. Presentation 1 (Yue YANG): Effects of a Customized Tertiary EFL Teacher Training Programme in Central China: A Longitudinal Study Presentation 2 ( Hong ZHANG): The Mechanism of an Inter-departmental Professional Learning Community of University Foreign Language Teachers Presentation3 (Tao FENG): The Use and Impacts of Online Community in Teacher Training---A Case Study of College EFL Instructors in China Presentation 4 (Changcheng DUAN): Research Competence Development of EFL Teachers: An Exploratory Study of an Online Academic Community in China
The Mechanism of an Inter-departmental Professional Learning Community of University Foreign Language Teachers
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Hong Zhang, National Research Centre For Foreign Language Education
This symposium explores the practices & effects of in-service tertiary foreign language(FL) Teacher professional development(PD) programmes. It invites qualitative / quantitative studies that analyze and evaluate either off-line or on-line tertiary FL teacher PD programmes aiming to enhance the teaching or research competence of teachers.
The Development of the Operational Mechanism of an Online Academic Community of Foreign Language Teachers in China
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Changcheng Duan, Editor, Foreign Language Teaching And Research Press
This paper studies the development of the operational mechanism of a foreign language teachers on-line professional learning community(TOPLC) through 4 years. The study finds the upgraded mechanism of the community is more main participating member-centred, the interaction in it more social, and the learning in it more expansive. The findings provide implications for the further development of this community as well as other TOPLCs .
In-service Professional Development: Experiences from the Field
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Li Li, University Of Exeter
Drawing on the experiences of thirty teachers from a variety of contexts within China, and covering a range of career stages, this presentation will utilise semi-structured interviews to explore the provision and consider the value both Chinese and expatriate educators place on their own in-service tertiary professional development experiences.
Material development and teacher training
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Tao Feng, Foreign Language Teaching And Research Press
This lecture outlines a context of change in China in which new textbooks were introduced into some colleges. In order to prepare teachers for textbooks which were innovative in this context, three types of trainings are offered to help them adapt the textbook.
Demystifying textual competence descriptors of organizational competence
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Luna Yang, China Agricultural University
Textual competence (Purpura, 2004; Bachman & Palmer, 1996, 2010) is an indispensable component of the organizational competence verified by various research studies in language communication. This presentation reports how data were collected to validate the usefulness of the textual competence descriptors of organizational competence subscale in China’s Standards of English.
From Diagnostic Language Assessment to Tailored EFL Learning: The Effectiveness of Personalized Cognitive Diagnostic Score Report for College English Writing
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Xiaomei Ma, Xi'an Jiaotong University
This study presents how a multi-dimensional EFL writing score report is generated for college EFL learners by using cognitive diagnostic approach. The effectiveness of the report is also verified by conducting a three-month quasi-experiment. The results are accurate, reliable and effective and significant in personalized assessment and tailored learning.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S161 1/3 | Study abroad as a multilingual, intercultural and transnational experience
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Josep M. Cots, University Of Lleida
Ana Beaven, University Of Bologna
Sanja Marinov, Faculty Of Economics, Business And Tourism, University Of Split
Yulia Kharchenko, PhD Researcher, Supervised By Dr Phil Chappell And Prof Phil Benson, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
Mireia Trenchs-Parera, Professor In Applied Linguistics And Multilingualism. University's Commisioner For Language Policy. , Pompeu Fabra University
Sybille Heinzmann, Pedagogical University Of St. Gallen
Sònia Mas-Alcolea, University Of Lleida
June Eyckmans, Ghent University
Eiko Ujitani, Nagoya University Of Foreign Studies
Zeynep Köylü, University Of Basel
Noriko Iwasaki, Nanzan University
Arwa Alsufyan, Assistant Professor, Imam Muhammad Ibn Saud Islamic University
Jin Guo, University College London
Anne Marie Devlin, University College Cork
Annarita Magliacane, Lecturer In TESOL And Applied Linguistics, University Of Liverpool
Ayako Suzuki, Tamagawa University
Celeste Kinginger, Penn State University
Griet Boone, Ghent University
Judith Borràs, University Of Lleida
Khaled Al Masaeed, Carnegie Mellon University
Michele Back, University Of Connecticut
Midori Shikano, Nanzan University
Yoko Munezane, Rikkyo University
Ozge Guney, University Of South Florida
Miroslaw Pawlak, Adam Mickiewicz University, Kalisz, Poland
Roswita Dressler, Associate Professor, University Of Calgary
Rodrigo Rodriguez-Fuentes, Universidad Del Norte
Rosamond Mitchell, University Of Southampton
Saule Petroniene, Kaunas University Of Technology
Kata Csizér, Eotvos Lorand University
Yi Wang, Stony Brook University
Moderators
Rosamond Mitchell, University Of Southampton
Kata Csizér, Eotvos Lorand University
Ana Beaven, University Of Bologna
June Eyckmans, Presenter, Ghent University
Nicole Tracy-Ventura, West Virginia University
Mark Van Huizen, AILA2021 Volunteer
Study abroad is a complex educational experience, with potential to support academic, linguistic, personal and intercultural development. Traditionally, applied linguistics research has concentrated on SA as an opportunity for second language acquisition by instructed learners, with a focus on single languages (English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese etc). However in practice study abroad today takes place in multilingual and multicultural environments, and involves students from increasingly diverse transnational backgrounds. Much less is known about the likely impact of such complex experiences on student development (e.g. whether they experience multilingualism and/ or interculturality as a series of separate linguistic and cultural encounters, or as an integrated whole). This symposium therefore invites contributions from researchers interested in the impact of contemporary study abroad experiences on: students' evolving multilingualism including development in individual languages plus interactions between home languages, local languages, English as a lingua franca students' beliefs, language attitudes and multilingual identity students' intercultural and transnational orientation students' personal development in terms of agency, self-regulation and autonomy. As well as reporting their empirical research, contributors will be asked to reflect on their theoretical contribution to the understanding of SA, and/or to the educational support frameworks which can maximise students' development in contemporary SA settings.S161 detailed programme, click here
Student mobility in Europe and its implications for plurilingual identity development
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Josep M. Cots, University Of Lleida
Ana Beaven, University Of Bologna
Sanja Marinov, Faculty Of Economics, Business And Tourism, University Of Split
This paper reports a qualitative study of language identity among mobile European students in varied higher education contexts. Participants’ language learning history, current language practices and language identifications were investigated. Findings indicate the prevalence of a relatively fluid plurilingual identity among this group; implications for language identity theory are discussed.
Learning English and more Down Under: Multilingual experiences and identity development of international English language students in Australia
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yulia Kharchenko, PhD Researcher, Supervised By Dr Phil Chappell And Prof Phil Benson, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
Study abroad is a period of intensive change in both language use and identity development. This paper explores how out-of-class experiences of international English language students in Australia impact their language identity. My research findings point at study abroad as a multilingual experience, not target language immersion, and suggest re-conceptualising study abroad in terms of 'whole-person' linguistic outcomes that are broader than target language acquisition.
Cosmopolitanism and multilingualism in internationalized classrooms with full EMI: Exploring undergraduates’ intercultural sensitivity, identity self-adscription and language practices in Catalonia
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Mireia Trenchs-Parera, Professor In Applied Linguistics And Multilingualism. University's Commisioner For Language Policy. , Pompeu Fabra University
In the context of an internationalized multilingual and multicultural undergraduate classroom with full EMI in Catalonia, this mixed methods study focuses on the interaction between students' (a) self-adscription to either localist or cosmopolitan identities, (b) development of intercultural sensitivity, and (c) plurilingual practices and educational background. 
To be or not to be multilingual? Monolingual versus multilingual norms and language practices among study abroad students
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sybille Heinzmann, Pedagogical University Of St. Gallen
Robert Hilbe, St. Gallen University Of Teacher Education
Co-authors :
Kristina Ehrsam, St. Gallen University Of Teacher Education
Lukas Bleichenbacher, St.Gallen University Of Teacher Education
This presentation will shed light on study abroad students' monolingually or multilingually oriented language attitudes at the outset and the end of their stay abroad. Moreover, it will outline students’ (potentially multilingual) language practices during the stay and explore how these can be related to their aforementioned language attitudes.
Study abroad and (the lack of) linguistic gains: understanding the students’ social networks abroad as a key factor
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sònia Mas-Alcolea, University Of Lleida
Helena Torres-Purroy, University Of Lleida
This paper sheds light on (1) the diversity of Erasmus students’ discourses about their second language acquisition experiences; (2) the way(s) in which this diversity is influenced mainly by their (lack of) social networks abroad; and (3) other intervening factors that ultimately affect the students’ different socialisation patterns abroad.
Sense of agency and linguistic immersion during study abroad
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
June Eyckmans, Ghent University
Co-authors :
Griet Boone, Ghent University
In this paper presentation we wish to shed light on the relationship between students’ sense of agency and their perception of language learning success and cultural integration. In the study, 34 exchange students are tracked throughout a five month compulsory study abroad programme in four different European countries.
Promoting intercultural learning without crossing a national border: An exploratory study
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Eiko Ujitani, Nagoya University Of Foreign Studies
This presentation explains the impact of a short-term international volunteer project between Japanese and Taiwanese students on their intercultural learning. Results revealed that Japanese students increased their willingness to communicate in English and their interest in learning about Taiwanese culture. How to implement an effective project will be also discussed.
Anglophone and Non-Anglophone ERASMUS for L2 English Learners: Contextual Effects of Study Abroad on L2 Gains
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Zeynep Köylü, University Of Basel
This study investigated the contextual effects of two different sojourn contexts on L2 development. The results of the qualitative analysis provided broader insights into the features of Anglophone and English as a Lingua Franca study abroad contexts, underlining issues of intercultural competence and ownership of language along with developmental findings.
Plurilingual identities of Denisa, a Slovak student: Changes to her linguistic repertoire at different stages of her life
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Noriko Iwasaki, Nanzan University
This paper illustrates plurilingual identities of Denisa, a female Slovak student, who has extensive study abroad experiences, focusing her lived experience of language (Busch, 2017). Changes to her repertoire are nuanced, having to prioritise some components for her career, while minimising others despite their emotional value.
The Identity Development of Saudi L2 Learners of English in Ireland
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Arwa Alsufyan, Assistant Professor, Imam Muhammad Ibn Saud Islamic University
This paper addresses how the intercultural experiences of L2 Saudi females were different to L2 learners of other nationalities. It sheds light on some incidents that have helped learners become interculturally competent, and concludes by proposing future directions.
Negotiation of National Identity in Multilingual and Multicultural Context: A Case Study of Chinese Postgraduate Students at a British university
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Jin Guo, University College London
The paper explores how Chinese international students, studying in a postgraduate programme in the UK, perceive national identity and identify negotiation. It illustrates the impact of languages, cultures and power relations in multilingual and multicultural context on individuals’ identity negotiation.
Is this really immersion? Social networks, diversity and intensity of language contact, and student attitudes during a short-term SA experience
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Anne Marie Devlin, University College Cork
Taking a mixed-methods approach, this study explores social network formation, intensity and diversity of language contact, and student attitudes in a short-term, island-type study abroad. It concludes that students do not expand their social networks or engage in diverse linguistic interaction. The majority express a desire for greater classroom engagement.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S167 | Technology-mediated corrective feedback and instruction in language learning
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Victoria Kim, Ulsan National Institute Of Science And Technology
Eva Kartchava, Carleton University
Imelda Bangun, University Of South Florida
Maria Lourdes Lira Gonzales, Université Du Québec In Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Canada
Elu Tu, Southern Connecticut State University
Matthew Pattemore, University Of Barcelona
Moderators
Eva Kartchava, Carleton University
Although the use of technology in second/additional language (L2) education is on the rise, little is known about how it can best assist the process of language learning. This is especially true for corrective feedback- information provided to language learners about the accuracy of their output- which is considered by many to play a crucial role in the development of one's linguistic knowledge and as such, can be instrumental in helping learners notice, monitor, and improve their L2 output. This symposium aims to bring together cutting-edge investigations that address the topic of computer-mediated feedback and instruction, highlighting the latest findings in this area and examining their implications for L2 acquisition and instruction. With the growing use of technology in the L2 classroom and beyond, today, more than ever, understanding the role of technology is paramount in promoting interaction that is appropriate for the development of oral and/or written language skills. This symposium is a great opportunity to share information, identify key knowledge gaps, and promote discussion and collaboration among researchers and language educators who are interested in this area. We invite papers and posters that address recent advances in theory, research, and practice in this domain.
S167 | introduction by organizers
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Eva Kartchava, Carleton University
Hossein Nassaji
A brief introduction by the symposium organizers
The effects of formative feedback delivered via a social Q&A platform in the English-medium instruction context
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Victoria Kim, Ulsan National Institute Of Science And Technology
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of formative feedback delivered via a social Q&A online platform on EFL writers' (n=120) performance and motivation, as well as to explore their perceptions towards the use of the platform in the English-Medium Instruction (EMI) classroom. The findings have several pedagogical implications for both the EFL and EMI contexts.
Task repetition and learner self-assessment in technology-mediated task performance
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Eva Kartchava, Carleton University
Hossein Nassaji
Examining the role of feedback, learner self-assessment and teacher’s guidance on repeated L2 task performance, this study shows important effects for task repetition and feedback and that technology allows for a repeated examination of learner performance and to determine the effects of self-assessment, coupled with teacher feedback, on task repetition.
Fostering Peer/Teacher Corrective Feedback in Online Collaboration Academic Writing Courses
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Imelda Bangun, University Of South Florida
While online corrective feedback is proven to help English learners construct their academic knowledge and critical thinking skills, the study of its effectiveness, particularly in online writing and editing collaboration is largely absent. This paper analyzes EAP students’ perception of online peer/teacher feedback and examines their technology-mediated feedback and interaction.
The impact of blog-mediated peer feedback and peer feedback training on the accuracy and quality of L2 writing
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Maria Lourdes Lira Gonzales, Université Du Québec In Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Canada
Co-authors :
Hossein Nassaji
Jimmy Chao
This presentation reports on a study comparing the provision and efficacy of students’ peer feedback in blogs with and without previous peer feedback training. Forty L2 students registered in a French as a foreign language University program in Costa Rica participated in the study. Results will be presented and implications will be discussed.
A Review on Screencast Feedback of Second Language Writing Studies: form Standards’ Perspectives
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Elu Tu, Southern Connecticut State University
This study reviews studies between 2010 and 2020 to examine screencast second language written corrective feedback under the framework of Best Practices and the International Society for Technology in Education standards to reconceptualize the notion of e-feedback and refine the best practice in the field of second language writing studies.
Uptake of Elaborative Feedback in Serious Literacy Games
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Matthew Pattemore, University Of Barcelona
Co-authors :
Roger Gilabert Guerrero, University Of Barcelona
We examine the uptake of elaborative corrective feedback by 200 Spanish/Catalan primary school EFL learners using early reading development digital games over a year. Results will be discussed in relation to the role of corrective feedback in the context of digital games and how this may contribute to reading development.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S188 1/2 | Understanding the dynamics of language teachers’ professional development
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Imelda Bangun, University Of South Florida
Andrea Lypka
Siebrich De Vries, University Of Groningen
Jeannette Sanchez-Naranjo, Amherst College
Xiao Cheng, East China Normal University
Gabriela Cusen, Transilvania University Of Brasov
Kazuyoshi Sato, Nagoya University Of Foreign Studies
Chitose Asaoka, Dokkyo University
Atsuko Watanabe, Bunkyo University
Mayumi Asaba, Kyoto Sangyo University
Beatrice Dupuy, Professor Of French / Public And Applied Humanities, University Of Arizona
Vasiliki Celia Antoniou, Lecturer / Senior Teaching Fellow, University College London / University Of The West Of Scotland
Jenelle Reeves, University Of Nebraska-Lincoln
Natheeporn Keawkhong, Thammasat University
Kyoko Kasuya, Tokyo Gakugei University
Lorena Salud Gadella Kamstra, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University Of Essex
Moderators
Inge Elferink, University Of Groningen
Siebrich De Vries, University Of Groningen
Seyit Omer Gok, AILA2021 Volunteer
Because most language learning takes place in educational contexts, from an ecological perspective, it is important to understand the dynamics of language teachers' professional development. This understanding is necessary for two reasons: (1) to exchange new research insights and practical experience in a sustainable manner and (2) to generate new insights regarding the dynamic processes of the professional development of individual teachers. Within complex systems thinking, these dynamic processes are an intrinsic part of social behavior and will vary for different people and even for the same person in different contexts (Opfer & Pedder, 2011). Pedagogical content knowledge research focuses on this dual purpose via, for example, teacher professional development programs centering around language teaching pedagogy. A challenge within this field of research, however, is taking the dynamic processes and the teaching contexts of individual teachers into consideration. This symposium brings together recent research that has faced this challenge thereby aiming to obtain a deeper understanding of the dynamics of language teachers' professional development.Please click here for the detailed program.
The dynamics of jointly constructing PCK through lesson study
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Siebrich De Vries, University Of Groningen
Throughout their careers teachers individually develop their Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK). This PCK often remains unconscious or ‘tacit’. The lesson study professionalization approach provides a framework for becoming aware of it, discussing it in a team context, and in this way jointly constructing new practical knowledge that benefits (one's own) education. Lesson study focuses on the collective and systematic improvement of the quality of teachers’ own teaching practice and is different from other forms of collaborative and inquiry oriented teacher learning because of the explicit and detailed attention to the thinking and learning of students. For many (language) teachers lesson study is a new and exciting approach. What is lesson study and what is needed at the teacher and the school level to jointly construct new PCK in a sustainable manner?
Professional Development Matters in Ensuring Quality Language Teaching and Learning
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Jeannette Sanchez-Naranjo, Amherst College
This study reports on the outcomes of a professional development program designed for reflecting about those discrepancies resulting from instructional choices in communicative L2 Spanish classrooms. Results showed that language teachers cannot act as technicians and implement a set of behaviors in the L2 Spanish classroom.
Teacher change and school change during the transition to competence-oriented education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Xiao Cheng, East China Normal University
XUNYI PAN
This paper explores the transitional process the English teachers going through to get adapted to the competence-oriented education with the help of a one-year teacher development programme. The results show that teacher perceptions change more easily than practice, and the pressure from exams is a major factor hindering the change.
Investigating pre-service teachers’ views of language teaching instruction
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Gabriela Cusen, Transilvania University Of Brasov
The first steps into the professional development of language teachers are usually taken at university where undergraduate students having decided to go on the path of teaching languages become ‘pre-service teachers’. This study investigates these ‘fledging’teachers views of the instruction they are exposed to at university prior to their entering real-life classrooms.
From Preservice Teacher Preparation to Inservice Teacher Development: Teacher Learning in Context
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kazuyoshi Sato, Nagoya University Of Foreign Studies
This longitudinal study keeps track on five novice elementary school teachers who received a yearlong preservice teacher preparation program and reveal how they try to “apply the teaching methods they were trained to use” (Farrell, 2021, p. 447) in their school contexts.
Understanding the trajectory of pre-service EFL teachers’ professional development in a community of practice
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Chitose Asaoka, Dokkyo University
Atsuko Watanabe, Bunkyo University
This study attempts to explore the trajectory of pre-service EFL teachers’ professional development in a collaborative online community of practice and to delve deeper into examining how such a community facilitates their reflective skills and expertise development.
Exploring L2 Teacher Development of Expertise
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Mayumi Asaba, Kyoto Sangyo University
The presenter describes three elements critical to developing expertise based on case studies of four EFL instructors at Japanese universities. The findings supported previous studies of expertise, which claimed that reflection and problem solving are essential to teacher development, but also indicated the importance of contextual factors for fostering expertise.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S191 1/2 | Visualising multilingualism as lived
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Åsta Haukås, University Of Bergen
Brigitta Busch, University Of Vienna | Stellenbosch University
Sofia Stratilaki-Klein, Maître De Conférences / Associate Professor, Sorbonne Nouvelle And University Of Luxembourg
So-Yeon Ahn, Korea Advanced Institute Of Science And Technology
Siv Björklund, Åbo Akademi University
Karita Mård-Miettinen, University Of Jyväskylä
Nayr Ibrahim, Associate Professor, Nord University
Moderators
Paula Kalaja, University Of Jyväskylä, Finland
Sílvia Melo-Pfeifer, University Of Hamburg
Jelle Brouwer, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
This symposium focuses on multilingualism as lived or as subjectively experienced- and accessed by visual means. More specifically, it addresses aspects of becoming or being multilingual subjects in different contexts, be they learners, teachers or users of more than one language: what sense do they themselves make of aspects of their lives or worlds where they find themselves in, including identities, emotions and future aspirations. These issues are studied by collecting visual data, e.g., by asking participants in studies to produce drawings (or self-portraits) or to take photos. The pools of visual data of various kinds may be complemented by other types data and are analysed for their form and/or content. The symposium is a response to the recently launched turn in applied language studies (i.e., the multilingual turn) and to the criticism against "lingualism" in addressing multilingualism as lived- and is different in its focus from an objective approach to multilingualism and from describing linguistic landscapes or schoolscapes. Invited speakers include Professors Brigitta Busch, University of Vienna, Austria, and Sílvia Melo-Pfeifer, University of Hamburg, Germany.Click here to find the detailed program
Visualising multilingual identity trajectories: the spaciotemporal potential of language maps
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Nayr Ibrahim, Associate Professor, Nord University
Language maps help to elicit teachers’ and children’s multilingual journeys in order to acknowledge and make visible their complex language trajectories. Language maps, introduced in a teacher training programme, provided the teachers with a unique multimodal creative tool to uncover their own and their children’s invisible multilingual journeys.
“In this picture there is a Norwegian teammate, we speak Swedish or English”. Immersion students as users of multiple languages
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Karita Mård-Miettinen, University Of Jyväskylä
Siv Björklund, Åbo Akademi University
The presentation addresses Finnish second language immersion students’ use of their languages in informal spaces and is based on photographs taken by the students and on individual photo-elicitation interviews. The results showed that the majority-background immersion students’ lived a life using multiple languages flexibly while participating in everyday activities.
The Interplay of Fear and Desire in English Learner’s Imagined Identities and Communities
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
So-Yeon Ahn, Korea Advanced Institute Of Science And Technology
The present study examines how the interplay of fear and desire plays a role in the imagination of English learners’ future, and in the construction of accessible and imagined communities. The study employs a multimodal analytical framework to uncover how multiple modes are orchestrated to establish symbolic and representative values.
Plurilingualism and school inclusion: crossing paths with spaces and languages
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sofia Stratilaki-Klein, Maître De Conférences / Associate Professor, Sorbonne Nouvelle And University Of Luxembourg
The better understanding of linguistic resources of allophone learners led researches to focus attention on speakers and their situated practices in the diverse circumstances and contexts of their lives. We analyse the discourse and plurilingual competences of pupils who are learning French as a foreign/second language.
Becoming multilingual in school: Insights from pupils’ drawings
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Åsta Haukås, University Of Bergen
Inspired by previous research exploring visual learner narratives, this study explores which learning activities and emotions are represented in Norwegian pupils’ drawings of themselves in two different multilingual settings, learning L2 English and L3 French/German/Spanish.
Language portraits revisited: highlighting some theoretical and methodological aspects of visual approaches in multilingualism research
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Brigitta Busch, University Of Vienna | Stellenbosch University
Language portraits drawn and discussed during workshops in schools offer an insight into how children present their multilingual repertoires. Wittgenstein’s distinction between saying and showing and Langer’s concept of visual representation that distinguishes between discursive and presentational forms of meaning making can be helpful in developing further this multimodal approach.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S193 | What do we know and where do we go? : Emergent definitions of “materials” and “materials use” in language teaching and learning
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Suresh Canagarajah, Penn State University
Nigel Harwood, Sheffield University
Mel Engman, Lecturer (Education), Queen's University Belfast
Olivia Murphy Beggins
Nausica Marcos Miguel, Denison University
Minna Maijala, University Of Turku
Adon Berwick, PhD Candidate, Queensland University Of Technology
Claudia Fernández, Clinical Assistant Professor Of Spanish And Director Of The Spanish Basic Language Program, University Of Illinois-Chicago
Patrícia Costa, Member Of The English Language Team, Municipal Education Office Of Rio De Janeiro
Jéssica Carvalho, PhD Candidate, Tilburg University
Anne Marie Guerrettaz, Modertator, Washington State University
Moderators
Anne Marie Guerrettaz, Modertator, Washington State University
Nausica Marcos Miguel, Denison University
Mel Engman, Lecturer (Education), Queen's University Belfast
Scholars have recently highlighted the lack of research that examines how language learners and teachers actually use pedagogical materials (e.g., Guerrettaz & Johnston, 2013; Harwood, 2014, 2017; Jakonen, 2015; Matsumoto, 2019; Tarone, 2014). These and other studies (Canagarajah, 2018; Toohey et al., 2015) have emphasized the complexity of the materiality and polysemiotics of language teaching and learning environments. However, concepts at the heart of this area of inquiry-namely "materials" and "materials use"-have yet to be adequately conceptualized. Objects, environments, bodies, and texts function unpredictably across language learning contexts, in ways that often blur the boundaries among these. Therefore, simple definitions of "materials" and "materials use" are problematic. Nonetheless, the field needs shared terminology to unpack processes, relationships, and outcomes of materials in use. As such, the goal for this compilation of papers is to generate substantive and theoretical definitions of "materials" and "materials use." This symposium will consist of empirical studies of materials use across diverse language learning contexts as well as those that directly address conceptualization of the constructs in question (i.e., materials, materials use). Varied methodological approaches, including discourse analysis, multimodality, ethnography, corpus linguistics, and language development perspectives are needed, drawing from multiple sub-disciplines in applied linguistics. Click here for the detailed program. 
Expanding perspectives on materials use
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Suresh Canagarajah, Penn State University
This presentation is a discussion of the themes emerging in the individual paper presentations. The discussant will also identify emerging questions and directions for further study.
‘I’m really frustrated, because I just have to plan the whole lesson from scratch’: a teacher uses a problematic textbook
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Nigel Harwood, Sheffield University
This paper reports a qualitative case study featuring classroom observation-interview cycles investigating how and why Frank, an experienced English for Academic Purposes teacher at a UK university, used his TESOL textbook. Frank struggled to adapt the book to make it fit for purpose.
Materiality and land-based learning in Indigenous language reclamation
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Mel Engman, Lecturer (Education), Queen's University Belfast
Co-authors :
Mary Hermes, Co-author, University Of Minnesota
This study of materials in an Indigenous language reclamation context examines the intra-actions among Ojibwe First Speakers, immersion school youth, and land. We apply Indigenous perspectives (Simpson, 2014) and sociomateriality (Fenwick, 2015) to point-of-view videorecordings of bilingual walks in the woods to elucidate the complex relationships between land and language.
Measuring student perception on the effectiveness of authentic audiovisual materials on Spanish L2 vocabulary acquisition
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Olivia Murphy Beggins
This study examines the link between learning gains and learner perceptions of authentic audiovisual materials regarding L2 vocabulary acquisition in Spanish. In addition to a pre and post-test, a survey was administered regarding students' perception of explicit grammar teaching methodology and their resulting perceptions toward using implicit instruction and authentic materials in the classroom.
Vocabulary learning in L2 Spanish content-based courses: Opportunities from and with classroom materials
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Nausica Marcos Miguel, Denison University
Second language (L2) vocabulary is an important area of L2 learning. Nonetheless, the field knows little about vocabulary instruction in relation to materials. This study explores how materials shape vocabulary instruction in university-level, advanced L2 Spanish culture courses by analyzing sixteen recorded lessons of two courses. Connections between materials research and vocabulary research are drawn.
Pre-service language teachers’ reflections on and experiences in the use of textbooks during a one-year teacher education programme in Finland
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Minna Maijala, University Of Turku
Based on research literature and empirical data from a questionnaire and interviews conducted among FL teacher trainees during the one-year teacher training programme at a Finnish university, the presentation aims to shed light on the use of textbooks in the FL classroom from the perspectives of teacher trainees.
A sociological study of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) materials in use
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Adon Berwick, PhD Candidate, Queensland University Of Technology
EFL textbooks carry instructional content as well as principles for instruction. In this paper I present a modified version of Bernstein's model of pedagogic discourse used to interpret the underlying power and control relations during the enactment of an EFL listening textbook in a university context.
Perspectives of instructors using innovating language learning materials in collegiate US classrooms
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Claudia Fernández, Clinical Assistant Professor Of Spanish And Director Of The Spanish Basic Language Program, University Of Illinois-Chicago
This presentation reports the results of an exploratory study on the perspectives of instructors using task-based materials. It also reports the observations of two classes as instructors use and implement a final task.
Problematizing understandings of “students’ realities” in English teaching materials development for public municipal schools in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Patrícia Costa, Member Of The English Language Team, Municipal Education Office Of Rio De Janeiro
Jéssica Carvalho, PhD Candidate, Tilburg University
In the field of English language teaching materials, a fundamental part of their development is the study of the contexts in which these materials are used. For this reason, this paper investigates the notion of "students' realities" informing the English language teaching materials designed for public municipal schools in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S196 | Word of the Year initiatives: language as a mirror of dynamics in culture
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Daniel Perrin, AILA President, AILA International Association Of Applied Linguistics
Simona Klemencic, Znanstvenoraziskovalni Center SAZU
Arkadiusz Bogucki, University Of Warsaw
Iman Nick, Germanic Society For Forensic Linguistics
Elsa Liste Lamas, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Marlies Whitehouse, AILA Treasurer, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Moderators
Elsa Liste Lamas, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Marlies Whitehouse, AILA Treasurer, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Word of the year initiatives can increase society's awareness of the role language plays in everyday life. By reflecting on the public discourse of the previous twelve months, words of the year can shed light on what issues have moved people the most and what makes a society tick. For Applied Linguists, the phenomenon is of twofold interest: First, empirically grounded selection processes of socially predominant words require sophisticated analytical tools from discourse and corpus analysis. Second, media coverage of every word of the year is an opportunity to raise both language awareness and the visibility of Applied Linguistics in society at large. The contributions in this panel define key concepts of word of the year initiatives; explain the evaluation processes for words of the year in specific-mostly national- contexts; analyze the interplay of stakeholders such as academic and non-academic institutions (e.g., publishers and media), communities (e.g., subscribed followers of initiatives), resources (e.g., linguistic databases), and processes (e.g., corpus-based evaluation methods) involved. We conclude the panel presentations by discussing the advantages and difficulties of transgressing disciplinary boundaries and combining (folk) linguistic epistemes in and beyond academia with popular word of the year initiatives.
Folk pragmatics. Combining Applied Linguistics and Word of the Year initiatives
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Daniel Perrin, AILA President, AILA International Association Of Applied Linguistics
Co-authors :
Marlies Whitehouse, AILA Treasurer, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Word of the year initiatives can increase society-at-large’s awareness of Applied Linguistics. In this presentation, we discuss empirically based measures to raise the value that twinning word of the year initiatives and Applied Linguistics can add to both theory and practice of folk linguistics.
Word of the Year in Switzerland
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Marlies Whitehouse, AILA Treasurer, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Word of the year initiatives can increase society-at-large's awareness of Applied Linguistics. By reflecting the public discourse of the past twelve months, words of the year can literally show what moved people most and how a society ticks.
Beseda leta – Slovene Word of the Year
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Simona Klemencic, Znanstvenoraziskovalni Center SAZU
In Slovenia, the Word of the year poll is carried out since 2016 by the Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts and media. A shortlist of ten words is released, chosen from a list of words, submitted by the general public at the organizers’ appeal. The word of the year is elected through a public vote.
Winning Names and Naming Winners: The American Name Society’s Word-of-the-Year Academic Initiative and its Relationship to US American Popular Culture
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Iman Nick, Germanic Society For Forensic Linguistics
Since its inception in 1951, the American Name Society has promoted the scholarly investigation of names. With this goal, the Society holds an annual word-of-the-year contest. The linguistic winners not only reflect, but may also affect national developments. The (dis)advantages of combining folk epistemes to this academic initiative are discussed.
Form and function of attributes in light verb constructions in the german sociopolitical press.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Arkadiusz Bogucki, University Of Warsaw
A break of grammar rules or language development? This speech deals with the attribution of nouns in light verb constructions in the german press. Forms of the attribution and their possible influences on the reception of the text are described on the basis of the 50 articles from Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and Die Welt.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S201 | Language and linguistic inequality
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Işıl Erduyan, Asst. Prof., Bogaziçi University
Phoebe Siu, Lecturer, College Of Professional And Continuing Education, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Deise Castro, Student PhD, Pontifical Catholic University Of Rio De Janeiro
Moderators
Marjolijn Verspoor, Chair AILA Organizing Committee And Mentor, University Of Groningen
Işıl Erduyan, Asst. Prof., Bogaziçi University
Lilly Göthe - AILA Volunteer, Volunteer, University Of Groningen
This panel brings together papers that focus on various forms of linguistic inequality across various settings. The symposium starts with a panel session in which the following guiding questions with respect to the individual contexts are discussed:How do we investigate inequality in language? Why should we investigate inequality in relation to multilingualism or other context?How could we promote social equity through reconceptualising language/ML?08:30-09:30 | Panel Discussion09:30-10:00 | Isil Erduyan10:00-10:30 | BREAK10:30-11:30 | Phoebe Siu & Deise Castro11:30-12:00 | General Discussion
Multiple Faces of Linguistic Inequality: The German-Turkish Interface Reversed
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Işıl Erduyan, Asst. Prof., Bogaziçi University
This paper reports on a linguistic ethnographic study focusing on multilingual German professionals living in Istanbul. Taking a scalar perspective, the paper seeks to address linguistic inequality as reflected in discourse, and how it relates to the constellation of German-Turkish-English in the multilinguals' repertoires.
Re-negotiating Symbolic Power in Critical CLIL: The Multimodalities-Entextualisation Cycle (MEC) as heuristics for boundary-making/ unmaking in Public Relations Writing
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Phoebe Siu, Lecturer, College Of Professional And Continuing Education, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
This paper addresses symbolic inequality (Zhu & Kramsch, 2016) through investigating translanguaging pedagogy as boundary-making/ unmaking counter-discourse. This paper uses nexus analysis (Scollons, 2004) to ethnographically research on the Multimodalities-Entextualisation Cycle (MEC) (Lin, 2015; 2018) in a Critical CLIL classroom for 72 bilingual Public Relations Writing students in Hong Kong.
Entextualization in the textual trajectories of legal discourses in judicial processes of female offenders who seek house arrest in Brazil
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Deise Castro, Student PhD, Pontifical Catholic University Of Rio De Janeiro
We study the discourse employed in a judicial process dealing with women home imprisonment through article 318 of the Law 3689/41 of the Brazilian Code of Criminal Procedure. We present, in an ethnometodological perspective of the text, how entextualization is linked to the co-production of texts, their trajectories and the contexts of processes that involve such situation.
12:00 Noon - 01:30PM
New AILA honorary members reception in Gather.Town
Reception for new AILA honorary members @Gathertown AULA1Tim McNamara, Bernd Ruschdoff, Clarie Kramsch, Marjolijn Verspoor.Go to Gathertown!
12:00 Noon - 01:30PM
LUNCH
12:15PM - 01:00PM
Body-Mind-Recharge in Gather.Town Acitivity Center
During all lunch times in between symposia, we can revitalize with Iryna, an international and multilingual yoga teacher with over 10 years of experience. She will guide the 45 minutes yoga & stretching break to help you recharge and rebuild your mental and physical resources.Every session, she will start with breathing practice for a better focus, continue with yoga postures for shoulders, chest and lower back and finish with grounding meditation. This session is suitable and accessible for all levels and all you need is comfortable clothes for stretching, a mat, a towel or a chair to sit on.Go to Gathertown!
01:30PM - 02:30PM
Room 1
Keynote Carmen Munoz
Format : Plenary
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Marije Michel, Co-chair AILA & Mentor, Groningen University
Carmen Muñoz, University Of Barcelona
Moderators
Marije Michel, Co-chair AILA & Mentor, Groningen University
May Wu (AILA2021 Team)
Carmen Munoz (University of Barcelona, Spain)Carmen is a leading and well-respected figure in AL in the European context. Her research interests include the effects of age and context on second language acquisition, young learners in instructed settings, individual differences, and bilingual/multilingual education. Her topic will be out-of-school learning and the potential of multimodal input (i.e. captions and subtitles) for language learning.
Introduction by Marije Michel
01:30PM - 02:30PM
Presented by :
Marije Michel, Co-chair AILA & Mentor, Groningen University
Language learning through audiovisual input in and out of the classroom
01:30PM - 02:30PM
Presented by :
Carmen Muñoz, University Of Barcelona
Anecdotal accounts about language learning through audiovisual input are increasingly frequent while research on how this happens from a language acquisition perspective is leaving its infancy. In this talk I will attempt to provide an overview of this area highlighting some of the research findings that have shown the language learning potential of this multimodal input both from experimental studies measuring language gains and from qualitative studies conveying learners' voices. While doing so, the talk will engage with issues that go beyond the specific conditions under which this learning occurs and which are relevant to the field of second language acquisition. The talk ends by relating learning through audiovisual input to the more general area of informal language learning which, especially within digital contexts, may transform school language education in radical ways.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S001 2/2 | ‘Spaces of otherwise’? South-North dialogues on languaging, race, (im)mobilities
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Caroline Kerfoot, Symposium Convenor And Presentor; Mentor, Stockholmsuniversitet
Mingdan Wu, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University College London
Necia Billinghurst, University Of South Australia
Mona Elsamaty, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University Of Toronto
Moderators
Caroline Kerfoot, Symposium Convenor And Presentor; Mentor, Stockholmsuniversitet
Saioa Cipitria, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
In writing of the 'economies of abandonment' of neoliberal globalization, Povinelli (2011) also points to the potential for 'spaces of otherwise', those spaces of curiosity and risk, potentiality and exhaustion which open possibilities for more ethical becoming and the emergence of new forms of social life. This symposium brings into dialogue scholars of the global South and North concerned with the material consequences of language, race, and structurally induced (im)mobility. South and North are understood here as labile signifiers whose meaning is determined by everyday material and political processes. The interaction of perspectives from the North and the South creates the opportunity to revisit the limits of representation in mainstream social sciences, reconstituting and expanding dominant theory so that it may become more productive in analysing social and linguistic realities. The symposium seeks, for example, to critically interrogate the affordances of recent concepts such as translanguaging, linguistic citizenship, and raciolinguistics for their power to critique and replace destructive institutional structures, classifications, and the technologies that sustain them. It thus seeks to enlarge knowledges of agents, practices, and processes which could lay the basis for what Papadoupolous (2011) calls 'alter-ontology' – new realities – and maximise the possibilities of hope.
Constructing cosmopolitanism from below: Spaces of otherwise in South African primary schools
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Caroline Kerfoot, Symposium Convenor And Presentor; Mentor, Stockholmsuniversitet
This paper illuminates the construction of new social and linguistic orders in multilingual primary schools in Cape Town. It suggests that these emerging ideologies of postracial solidarity can be seen as examples of Fanon’s (1968) postcolonial cosmopolitanism ‘from below’, one that creates new terms for recognisability and ethical engagement.
Doing solidarity: language and race in spaces of otherwise
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Mingdan Wu, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University College London
This paper aims to examine how language both enables and prevents the practice of solidarity and the pursuit of projects of change and hope in spaces of otherwise. An ethnographic account is produced to unpack the contradictions between their racializing discourse and radical agenda, power dynamics and inequality structures.
‘We wear the mask’: Examples of strategic language play in spaces of (im)mobility
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Necia Billinghurst, University Of South Australia
This presentation contributes to the South-North dialogue on languaging, (im)mobilities, and colonial constructs through an exploration of how East African women of refugee-backgrounds strategically play with language ideology to assume identities and create spaces of increased mobility.
Language and identity of second-generation Arab immigrants in Montreal, Canada
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Mona Elsamaty, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University Of Toronto
This research explores the identities and language practices of second-generation Arab youth in Montreal, Canada. Data is collected through semi-structured interviews. Results show that almost all participants live in 'spaces of otherwise', assuming multiple identities and belongings, and showing different language practices and attitudes towards the languages they know.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S007 | Age as a critical factor in L2 learning – at any age or none!
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
David Birdsong, Featured Symposium Speaker, University Of Texas At Austin
Annick De Houwer, Harmonious Bilingualism Network
Karoliina Inha, University Of Jyväskylä
Christine Pleines, Lecturer, The Open University
Dorota Záborská, Waseda University
Ramsés Ortín, University Of Texas Rio Grande Valley
Gudrun Ziegler, President, Luxembourg Multi-LEARN Institute - Http://multi-learn.org
Simone Pfenninger, University Of Salzburg
Moderators
David Singleton, Trinity College Dublin
Simone Pfenninger, University Of Salzburg
Floor Van Den Berg (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
This symposium will focus on the question of the extent to which age and ageing influence the manner in which additional languages are learned and the level of L2 proficiency which can be attained on the basis of different starting ages. These questions will be addressed in an across-the-lifespan perspective, starting with presentations of research and insights relating to L2 acquisition in childhood, going on to deal with the controversy regarding the role and effects of the so-called "critical age" as well as of evidence emerging from early L2 instruction, examining findings with respect to L2 learnind In young and mature adulthood, and concluding with a look what has been coming out of the swathe of recent work on "third age" language learning. Our featured speaker will be David Birdsong, who has long professed scepticism with regard to the Critical Period Hypothesis, and whose view is that no L2 user can ever perform in his/her additional language exactly like a monolingual native speaker because of the effects of multi-competence.Programme:14:30 – 14:40 Welcome and introduction of featured speaker14:40 – 15:10 Featured presentation David Birdsong 15:10 – 15:20 Q&A (David Birdsong's paper)15:20 – 15:40 Annick De Houwer15:40 – 16:00 Karoliina Inha 16:00 – 16:10 Q&A (De Houwer's and Inha's papers)16:10 – 16:30 Coffee break16:30 – 16:50 Christine Pleines16:50 – 17:10 Dorota Matsumoto17:10 – 17:20 Q&A (Pleines' and Matsumoto's papers)17:20 – 17:30 Poster pitch 1: Ramses Ortin 17:30 – 17:40 Poster pitch 2: Natalia Durus 17:40 – 17:50 Mini break17:50 – 18:15 Live session, General discussions and Q&A18:15 – 19:00 Informal drinks and opportunity to connect
Variable attainment among late L2 learners and native speakers: Conditioning factors beyond individual differences
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
David Birdsong, Featured Symposium Speaker, University Of Texas At Austin
This presentation revisits the relationship between late L2 learning and outcome variability. Unlike most preceding work that associates performance variability with individual differences (e.g. deriving from biographical, experiential, conative, identificational, genetic, bio-chemical, aptitude, cognitive style, etc. factors), our focus is on conditioning factors in variable outcomes that are independent of the participants themselves. For judgments of acceptability, the external conditioning factors include grammatical status of items, degree of native-control-group variability, and item ordering effects, along with analytical procedures, morphosyntactic complexity and judgment type (scalar vs. binary).
Language acquisition is not easy and smooth before the end of the supposed critical period.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Annick De Houwer, Harmonious Bilingualism Network
Many young children with two first languages from birth develop a good level of proficiency in only one of their languages, and not in the other. They may even show signs of language attrition before reaching primary school. Such findings contradict claims of guaranteed successful L2 learning in young children.
Exploring beliefs regarding language learning and language use in early language teaching: methodological considerations for studying young learners
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Karoliina Inha, University Of Jyväskylä
Co-authors :
Ari Huhta, University Of Jyväskylä
Karita Mård-Miettinen, University Of Jyväskylä
My paper presents two longitudinal studies investigating learners' beliefs, attitudes and out-of-school exposure to English in early language teaching. I will first discuss the context of the study and then focus more on the methodology of studying young learners, using our own methods as examples of attempts in developing more age-appropriate methods and tasks.
My motivation is my strength
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Christine Pleines, Lecturer, The Open University
This presentation links the concept of vicarious participation to current research into older language learners. Older learner are shown to be significantly more likely to listen to recorded tutorial interaction than younger learners. They report highly agentive learning behaviours and perceived benefits for motivation and language development.
Learning Foreign Languages in the Third Age: The Wellbeing Perspective
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Dorota Záborská, Waseda University
The reported investigation is into third-age foreign language learning experiences from a wellbeing perspective. Interviews with third-age learners were conducted and analysed through the lens of positive psychology, exploring the connections between the savouring of language learning and overall wellbeing, and how learners’ language-learning experiences contribute to “successful ageing”.
The encoding of stress in early and late learners of Spanish
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ramsés Ortín, University Of Texas Rio Grande Valley
The present talk focuses on the development of language-specific, phonological processing abilities in L2 and early bilingualism. We test the processing of stress by L2 learners of Spanish whose first language is English, and early English-Spanish bilinguals.
Educational policies and choices on second language(s) at preschool level in the European context of Luxembourg
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Natalia Durus, Researcher, Luxembourg Multi-LEARN Institute Asbl
Gudrun Ziegler, President, Luxembourg Multi-LEARN Institute - Http://multi-learn.org
Co-authors :
Jinyoung Choi, Researcher, Luxembourg Multi-LEARN Institute
Philippe Blanca, Researcher, Luxembourg Multi-LEARN Institute
The project focuses on identifying policies of "second language teaching and learning" at preschool level in schools in Luxembourg (public, private, European, international), a country marked by 47% of international mobility. Moreover, it inquires how the legal representatives of these children access and perceive information for an informed decision making as to the early education of their children in the context of multilingualisms. It shows the divide between the policies and the reality of multilingual students.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S015 2/2 | CDST research in the Chinese context
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Pengyun Chang, Chongqing University
Yurong Zheng, Mentor, Harbin Engineering University
Saeed Karimi-Aghdam, Nord University
Beilei Wang, Tongji University
Lawrence Jun Zhang, The University Of Auckland
Ting Huang AILA Volunteer, AILA2021 Volunteer, Fudan University
Moderators
Yongyan Zheng, Fudan University
Ting Huang AILA Volunteer, AILA2021 Volunteer, Fudan University
For the past two decades, the Complex Dynamic Systems Theory (CDST) has burgeoned in applied linguistics, especially on second language (L2) development (e.g. complexity, accuracy, fluency) and individual differences (e.g. motivation, working memory, and self-regulatory strategies). The CDST perspective sees language development taking place as individual learners mobilize their linguistic, cognitive, and affective resources to co-adapt to the learning environment, which justifies a balanced view on language learners, learner language, as well as the learning context. In addition to contribution made by U.S.-based scholars and European scholars at the University of Groningen, CDST empirical studies have also thrived in the Chinese context, a context characterized by a large language-learning population in instructed learning environment. However, due to most research is reported in Chinese, little is known to the international academia. The proposed symposium aims to bring forth Chinese scholars' voices in this regard. It opens with a featured presentation on an overview of CDST studies conducted in the Chinese context (including mainland China, Hong Kong, and Macao), followed by two sub-strands, one focusing on Chinese learners' L2 written and oral language development, and the other focusing on the individual differences of Chinese learners engaged in foreign language learning.Timeline S015 1/2 8:30-8:50 Welcome and introduction of our featured speaker8:50-9:30 Yongyan Zheng9:30-10:00 Jihua Dong, Yongyan Zheng10:00-10:30 Lawrence Jun Zhang10:30-11:00 Pengyun Chang11:00-12:00 Discussion of the first block 2/2 14:30-15:00 Yurong Zheng15:00-15:30 Saeed Karimi-Aghdam15:30-16:00 Beilei Wang16:00-17:00 Ting Huang and Discussion of the second block
The Dynamic Patterns of Syntactic Complexity in Chinese EFL Learners’ Writing Based on a Longitudinal Learner Corpus
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Yurong Zheng, Mentor, Harbin Engineering University
8From Dynamic Systems Theory (DST) perspective, this learner corpus-based study tracks the development of syntactic complexity in EFL learners' writing in 6-semester longitudinal span. The findings offer empirical evidence for the explanatory power of DST in the explanation of the dynamic features in EFL learners' syntactic complexity development.
Dialectical Dynamic Systems Theory: A Synthesis of Organicism and Contextualism Worldviews
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Saeed Karimi-Aghdam, Nord University
This paper endeavors to delineate upon some of the ontological and epistemological undercurrents of dialectical dynamic systems theory (D-DST) by drawing upon Pepper’s root metaphor theory. Specifically, it purports to shed light on D-DST by invoking organicism and contextualism worldviews and discusses its metatheoretical implications for the social-cognitive problem.
Preparing teachers for optional English courses in Chinese senior high schools
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Beilei Wang, Tongji University
This study focuses on teacher roles in the process of developing optional English courses in Chinese senior high schools. Case studies were conducted on the two different optional courses to figure out the roles teachers played at different stages of course development.
The role of variability in L2 development
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ting Huang AILA Volunteer, AILA2021 Volunteer, Fudan University
Co-authors :
Rasmus Steinkrauss, AILA 2021 Committee - Treasurer, University Of Groningen
Marjolijn Verspoor, Chair AILA Organizing Committee And Mentor, University Of Groningen
This study replicates Lowie and Verspoor (2019) with different subjects. We found that motivation, aptitude, and working memory do not predict L2 writing proficiency, but variability during development is a robust predictor for L2 writing proficiency. We concluded that variability is an important source of information in studying language development.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S017 | Chinese languages as mother tongues: complexity in practice and ideologies
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Xuesong Gao, University Of New South Wales
Yufei Guo, Sun Yat-sen University
Jing Huang, South China Agricultural University
Yi Wang, Stony Brook University
Rong Ren, Arizona State University
Sihua Liang, Sun Yat-sen University
Yingjia Zhang, University Of Toronto
Moderators
Yufei Guo, Sun Yat-sen University
In proposing a sociolinguistics of complexity, Blommaert (2014:13) argues that "the task of analysis is not to reduce complexity…but to demonstrate complexity, to unfold the complex and multifiliar features and their various different origins that are contained in synchronized moments of understanding". We take this as our theoretical and methodological point of departure in our discussion of the issue of mother tongue and related ideological complexity within the context of Chinese languages. Who defines 'mother tongue' and 'mother-tongue users' and (re)produces the mother-tongue vs. non-mother-tongue user hierarchy, ultimately, have to do with the regimentation of language use and associated values, and the dynamic interactions between groups of people, in any speech communities that have been historically constituted and imagined in contexts of linguistic, cultural and ideological change. What make this mother tongue issue more relevant today are significant increase in human mobility, the undergoing language shift and revitalization processes, and the questioning as well as reinforcement of categories such as language, old and new speakers, and ideologies of authority and authenticity. This panel aims to reveal how practices and ideologies associated with 'mother tongue' create a complex field that problematizes 'traditional' languages and their speakers and serve particular socio-political purposes.
To promote or not to promote the use of regional Chinese varieties
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Xuesong Gao, University Of New South Wales
This talk draws on my research on the media coverage on the ‘dialect’ crisis in mainland China. While I applaud the initiatives to preserve different regional Chinese varieties, I am critically aware of the phenomenon that ‘non-locals’ are often blamed for the ‘dialect’ crisis in the relevant media coverage.
Mapping Language Ideologies in Hong Kong today
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Yufei Guo, Sun Yat-sen University
Understanding the language-ideological processes associated with media effects is the centre of the current study. This study explores different kinds of language ideologies prevailing in the media space in contemporary Hong Kong society.
Linguistic authority and authenticity in relation to immigrants’ identities: what binaries cannot tell
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Jing Huang, South China Agricultural University
This paper examines how binary notions and ideological stances related to authenticity and mother-tongue users are (re)conceptualized and (re)contextualized in the constitution of social group differentiation.
Speaking Mandarin or Dialect: A Socio-Cultural Account of Child Language Use in Mainland China
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Yi Wang, Stony Brook University
Drawing on a nationally representative survey in 2010, this study provides the first quantitative analysis of Mandarin and dialect language use and its determinants both at home and in schools for children with the ages of 6-15 in contemporary China.
The innovation of online Chinese language: an empirical study on Enlgish words in an online community in China
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Rong Ren, Arizona State University
During the presentation, the researcher will first review the categorization of English loanwords and present how English words are integrated into Chinese in Computer Mediated Communication by showing the examples. Then, the researcher will discuss the amount of borrowing in different fields to reveal social factors that influenced language use.
The conceptualization of 'mother tongue' in multilingual China: historical, ideological perspectives and identity practices
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Sihua Liang, Sun Yat-sen University
This paper addresses the historical and theoretical underpinnings of the term 'mother tongue' in general and the empirical and ideological problems of using the term in the context of contemporary China in particular. The author draws on empirical data derived from an ethnographic project on language attitudes and language use in Southern China.
Rethinking the Complexity of 'Chinese Languages' and 'Mother Tongues' of Chinese Heritage Learners in Canada
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Yingjia Zhang, University Of Toronto
This study will use sociocultural theories through a case study to reveal the complexity of Chinese languages" and "mother tongues" through a case study of Chinese heritage learners in Canada."
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S021 2/2 | Collaborative Research in Language Education: reciprocal benefits and challenges
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Batia Laufer, Professor (emerita), University Of Haifa
Roswita Dressler, Associate Professor, University Of Calgary
Suzanne Bogaerds-Hazenberg, Utrecht University
Gabriele Pallotti, University Of Modena And Reggio Emilia
Ingela Finndahl, PhD Student, University Of Gothenburg
Alastair Henry, University West
Marie Källkvist, Lund University
Leah Shepard-Carey, Drake University, Iowa
Moderators
Camilla Bardel, Moderator S021, Stockholm University
Gudrun Erickson, Moderator S021, University Of Gothenburg
Marta Maggioni, AILA2021 Volunteer
Language Education (LE) at all levels benefits from research in a multitude of ways. Conversely, educational practices and experiences offer fertile ground for research into language learning, teaching and different forms of assessment of language development and use. Considering the two aspects of practice and research, and their interaction, it becomes obvious that research in LE is a reciprocal venture, with mutual benefits for all actors involved, where theory and practice meet and develop, jointly as well as individually. The proposed symposium aims to gather colleagues from different fields of LE with experiences from research that actively involves teachers, teacher educators and students of different ages and various backgrounds. We welcome proposals of presentations of results from research projects that aim at influencing theory and practice of learning, teaching and assessment in substantial and sustainable ways, as well as critical discussions of problematic aspects of collaborative research, for example research ethics. Furthermore, reflections at the conceptual and structural levels, focusing, for example, on theory development as well as on the influence of educational planning in relation to outcomes at local, national, and international levels are of great interest.
From research to a national curriculum: The case of a lexical syllabus
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Batia Laufer, Professor (emerita), University Of Haifa
This presentation discusses research findings that contributed to the Lexical Syllabus construction in the Israeli schools: Optimal lexical targets, learners' vocabulary knowledge, treatment of vocabulary in textbooks, and factors that affect vocabulary learning. The project involved a collaboration of researchers with teachers, textbook writers, curriculum planners, and assessment specialists.
Improving Second Language Education through Intensive German Weeks: An Action Research Collaboration between Teachers and Researchers
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Roswita Dressler, Associate Professor, University Of Calgary
Second language teachers design lessons to promote oral language production. One Canadian Bilingual Program has introduced Intensive German weeks in which they study the use of strategies from the Neurolinguistic Approach. Our action research highlights collaborative learning, but also the need for mutual understandings around research design and knowledge dissemination.
Teachers as co-designers? Lessons learned from collaboration in a design-based research on reading comprehension instruction
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Suzanne Bogaerds-Hazenberg, Utrecht University
Insights from scientific reading research only partially resonate in curricular materials for reading comprehension instruction. Design-based research (DBR) is considered a way to bridge this research-practice gap, as it requires close teacher-researcher collaboration. We report about the collaboration difficulties and mutual benefits of engaging co-designing teachers in a DBR-project.
Developing effective language education practices in the multilingual classroom: a project combining research, teacher training and classroom activities
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Gabriele Pallotti, University Of Modena And Reggio Emilia
Claudia Borghetti, University Of Bologna
Osservare l’Interlingua is a teacher training and action-research initiative aiming to produce, implement and assess activities for observing pupils' language development and devising relevant educational interventions based on the interlanguage approach. Teachers and researchers collaborate along the entire process. Some empirical results on the effectiveness of this approach are presented.
Young students’ language choice in Swedish Compulsory school - expectations, learning and assessment
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ingela Finndahl, PhD Student, University Of Gothenburg
In collaboration with students and teachers in three different language classrooms, this case study investigated the choice of a second foreign language in Swedish elementary school. The study explored students’ beliefs related to language learning, learning practices and language assessment at an early stage in the learning processes.
Authenticity and emotions in language teaching: A collaborative investigation
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Alastair Henry, University West
Authenticity is the experience of acting (or not acting) in ways that appear as ‘true to oneself’. In a professional development project, English teachers in Sweden explored authenticity experiences in teaching practice, and associated emotions. For the teachers, findings provided empowering insights. For research, they highlight need for continued investigation.
Teachers, students and teacher educators as language-policy makers: A nexus analysis of research in multilingual schools and classrooms
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Marie Källkvist, Lund University
Co-authors :
Pia Sundqvist, University Of Oslo
Erica Sandlund, Associate Professor, Karlstad University
Henrik Gyllstad
We present the MultiLingual Spaces research project, involving four researchers (also teacher trainers), six L2 English teachers and their students at four secondary schools in Sweden. The study is based in the ethnographic discourse-analytic framework Nexus Analysis (Scollon & Scollon, 2004), focusing on teacher and student cognition, classroom language practices and vocabulary learning in multilingual L2 English classrooms.  Over time, the researchers brought pedagogical translanguaging into the classrooms. The presentation focuses on how we met methodological challenges inherent in classroom research and on the affordances of Nexus Analysis for studying researcher, teacher and student agency.
(Re)imagining the Future of Translanguaging Pedagogies in TESOL through Teacher-Researcher Collaborations
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Leah Shepard-Carey, Drake University, Iowa
Zhongfeng Tian, Assistant Professor, The University Of Texas At San Antonio
In this presentation we argue that teacher-researcher collaborations hold the promise of embracing translanguaging pedagogies in TESOL classrooms. We propose a conceptual framework to call for both parties to develop translanguaging co-stances, and make translanguaging co-designs and co-shifts. We then share our own collaborative endeavors and end with pedagogical implications.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S022 | Communicating emotion in a foreign language: advantages and disadvantages of the detachment effect
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Catherine Catherine Caldwell-Harris, Director, Psycholinguistics Laboratory, Boston University
Norbert Vanek, University Of Auckland
Li Zhou, Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Svitlana KLÖTZL, Associate Researcher, University Of Vienna
Brittany Blankinship, PhD Researcher, University Of Edinburgh
Pernelle Lorette, Postdoc, University Of Mannheim
Sally Rachel Cook, Associate Research Fellow , Birkbeck College
Louise Rolland, Associate Research Fellow, Birkbeck, University Of London
Alex Panicacci, British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow, Queen Mary University Of London & University Of Washington
Jean-Marc Dewaele, Birkbeck, University Of London
Moderators
Jean-Marc Dewaele, Birkbeck, University Of London
Louise Rolland, Associate Research Fellow, Birkbeck, University Of London
Sanne Van Eijsden, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
The powerful associations formed between an L1 and early memories, sensations and emotions (Harris et al, 2006; Pavlenko, 2012) are often lacking in a foreign language (LX). Even 'balanced' multilinguals tend to report a preference for their first language (L1) when verbalising emotion and for emotional inner speech (Dewaele, 2015). Indeed, emotional expression appears to be a key driver for code-switching in multilinguals (Dewaele, 2013). Empirical research also shows that multilinguals have different physiological responses to emotional stimuli in different languages (Harris et al, 2003). However, the LX detachment effect can also help speakers to regulate uncomfortable emotions (Bond & Lai, 1986). The emotionality of an LX has implications for various domains where accuracy in expression and perception is crucial. These range from romantic relationships (Dewaele & Salomidou, 2017) to health care settings. In particular, emotional detachment of the LX can hinder or facilitate psychotherapeutic work depending on the situation (Buxbaum, 1949; Marcos, 1976; Rolland et al, 2017). The symposium will contrast the advantages (e.g. the disclosure of painful memories or the expression of feelings which are taboo in an L1) and disadvantages (muting the speaker's emotion and hindering authenticity) of the detachment effect in order to appreciate its complexities.Click here for detailed program
Detachment and uncertainty effects in evaluating moral dilemmas in a native vs. foreign language
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Catherine Catherine Caldwell-Harris, Director, Psycholinguistics Laboratory, Boston University
Co-authors :
Ayse Aycicegi-Dinn
Two patterns emerged when diverse moral dilemmas were evaluated by bilingual speakers. A detachment effect of reduced ethical choices was obtained when two simple choices were counterposed. In more complex vignettes, evaluating in a foreign language showed an uncertainty effect. This likely reflects fewer emotional resonances available to guide integration of multiple elements.
Perception of emotional intensity by English first (L1) and foreign (LX) users in different communication modalities
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Pernelle Lorette, Postdoc, University Of Mannheim
This self-report study investigates how 1368 participants perceived the intensity level of a British female’s emotional experience. Overall, audiovisual stimuli yielded higher intensity ratings than audio-only stimuli. More surprisingly, L1 participants’ intensity ratings were lower than LX participants’ ratings. Moreover, proficiency was negatively correlated with intensity ratings.
“Love has no Language BUT”: emotional de-(at)tachment of LX English in romantic relationship
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Svitlana KLÖTZL, Associate Researcher, University Of Vienna
By examining the data of romantic dyads with different linguacultural backgrounds who use English (as a lingua franca) which is a mother tongue for neither partner; the paper explores how far the couples are emotionally detached from their LX and how far this affects the accomplishment of their ‘coupleness’.
A sense of safety and personal freedom: the role a foreign language plays in the rehabilitation of survivors of torture.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Sally Rachel Cook, Associate Research Fellow , Birkbeck College
This small-scale qualitative study explores the role multilingualism plays in in the therapeutic experience of refugee torture survivors, within a supportive community. Fifteen community members were interviewed. The findings reveal that using English, a later-learned language for all of the interviewees, had unintended consequences contributing to positive therapeutic outcomes.
Comparing the language(s) of private thoughts and talking therapy: how emotional is a foreign language?
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Louise Rolland, Associate Research Fellow, Birkbeck, University Of London
Multilinguals' early languages are often associated with emotional expression and inner speech, although later languages can acquire emotional depth (Dewaele, 2013; Dewaele, 2015). This paper explores to what extent psychotherapy clients who used LX as the main therapy language report that this matched their language for inner speech.
'Am I sincere about my feelings?': the gains and losses of expressing emotions in a foreign language
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Alex Panicacci, British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow, Queen Mary University Of London & University Of Washington
Insights from 468 migrants revealed the emotional attachment to the first language as intensifying their feelings of difference when using the local language in emotional conversations. Participants' self-perceptions varied from a sense of detachment to liberation depending on the emotion being expressed, emphasising how language choice aligns to contextual needs.
The language of encoding, cueing, and recall influences emotional intensity and valence of past autobiographical memories and imagined future events
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Brittany Blankinship, PhD Researcher, University Of Edinburgh
Co-authors :
Thomas Bak
Our study investigates the age profile, emotional intensity, vividness, and valence of autobiographical memories using the Galton-Crovitz cueing technique. The results suggest that our memories are profoundly shaped by the languages in which we encode, cue, and recall the events.
The emotional weight of university-related vocabulary in Russian-English bilinguals online and offline: A skin conductance response and emotionality rating study
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Norbert Vanek, University Of Auckland
Co-authors :
Artem Tovalovich
Russian-English bilinguals’ emotional reactivity was tested via skin conductance responses and emotionality ratings of stimuli presented in both languages. The stimuli were university-related emotionally-laden critical items and neutral control items. Critical items elicited significantly stronger reactivity than control items both online and offline, with comparable effects in Russian and English.
Foreign language peace of mind: A LX positive emotion drawn from L1 culture
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Li Zhou, Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Co-authors :
Jean-Marc Dewaele, Birkbeck, University Of London
Katja Lochtman, Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Yiheng Xi, Renmin University Of China
Culture shapes the ways people perceive and verbalize emotions. The study presents a new positive emotion in LX learning, drawn from emotional preferences that encompass L1 culture.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S028 2/2 | Conversation Analysis and Language Teacher Education
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Goetz Schwab, Professor Of Applied Linguistics, Ludwigsburg University Of Education
Christine Jacknick, Borough Of Manhattan Community College
Marta García, University Of Göttingen
Carmen Konzett-Firth, University Of Innsbruck
Silvia Kunitz, Karlstad University
Moderators
Carmen Konzett-Firth, University Of Innsbruck
Ufuk Balaman, Hacettepe University
Mieke Breukelman (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer
Since the late 1990s, Conversation Analysis (CA) has been used extensively to study second/foreign/additional (L2) classroom discourse, language learning in and through interaction and L2 interactional competence. In the last decade, some individual initiatives have emerged to make this body of research available for L2 teacher education, mainly from two perspectives: 1) teaching fundamental CA principles to L2 teachers so they can use this knowledge for L2 teaching (Wong & Waring 2010) and 2) analyzing teachers' interactional behavior in classrooms with a view to enhancing their "classroom interactional competence" (Walsh 2011; Sert 2015). The interest in the intersection of CA and language teacher education has recently been demonstrated by two new edited CA volumes on language teaching and learning (cf. Kunitz, Markee & Sert 2019; Salaberry & Kunitz 2019) and a special issue on language teacher education in Classroom Discourse (2019). This symposium invites scholars world-wide who have an interest in empirical CA research on L2 language learning and teaching in and beyond classrooms with transferrable outputs for language teacher education. It aims to discuss the needs and challenges of this relatively young field, to find convergences between the current approaches and suggest ways forward for the future.Welcome to Part 2 of the panel, Conversation Analysis and Language Teacher Education co-organized by Carmen Konzett-Firth and Ufuk Balaman. Each contribution will primarily be available through the recorded talks which will be followed LIVE Q&A sessions (10 minutes each). Please see the schedule below and leave your questions to the Q&A area on the right hand side of the Dryfta page for a timely management of the Q&A session. Feel free to contact me via Chat box or simply e-mail me Carmen.Konzett@uibk.ac.atS028/2 SCHEDULE (All given in Europe/Amsterdam time. Please use Dryfta for time conversion): WATCH: 14:30 - 14:50 | Goetz Schwab: CA for VE – Online communication among future teachers of English in a Virtual Exchange project between Israel and GermanyLIVE: 14:50 - 15:00 | Q & A with Schwab WATCH: 15:00 - 15:20 | Christine Jacknick: Multimodal Listening in ESL Classrooms: Implications for Language TeachersLIVE: 15:20 - 15:30 | Q & A with Jacknick 15:30 - 16:00 -COFFEE BREAK WATCH: 16:00 - 16:20 | Marta García: Seeing and noticing: L2 Teachers' first steps in developing classroom interactional competenceLIVE: 16:20 - 16:30 | Q & A with Garcia WATCH: 16:30 - 16:50 | Carmen Konzett-Firth: Talk to each other! Practices of teaching L2 Interactional Competence and suggestions for improvementLIVE: 16:50 - 17:00 | Q & A with Konzett-Firth WATCH: 17:00 - 17:20 | Silvia Kunitz & Katharina Kley: Instructed Interactional Competence: Designing CA-inspired materials with the support of a professional development experienceLIVE: 17:20 - 17:30 | Q & A with Kunitz & Kley
CA for VE – Online communication among future teachers of English in a Virtual Exchange project between Israel and Germany
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Goetz Schwab, Professor Of Applied Linguistics, Ludwigsburg University Of Education
This presentation reports on the interactional practices within a telecollaborative project between pre-service teachers of English studying in their respective institutions in Israel and Germany. Drawing on Conversation Analysis, we will take a close reading of how students deploy their interactional resources to complete online tasks in Computer-Mediated Interaction (CMC).
Multimodal Listening in ESL Classrooms: Implications for Language Teachers
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Christine Jacknick, Borough Of Manhattan Community College
This multimodal conversation analytic study focuses on the performance of listening in an ESL classroom to examine how students display their (non)participation and (dis)engagement during extended teacher and student turns. Implications for teacher interactional awareness and reflective practice are discussed.
Seeing and noticing: L2 Teachers’ first steps in developing classroom interactional competence
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Marta García, University Of Göttingen
Drawing on data from video recorded Spanish as a Foreign Language (SFL) lessons and student teachers’ reflections, this contribution focuses on the challenges and benefits experienced by a group of prospective SFL teachers when taking part in a conversation analysis informed teacher university course.
Talk to each other! Practices of teaching L2 Interactional Competence and suggestions for improvement
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Carmen Konzett-Firth, University Of Innsbruck
This paper will report on some insights gained from sequential analyses of L2 peer interactions in French-as-a-foreign-language classrooms and suggest how these might be used to support pre- and in-service teachers in their planning and handling of peer interactions in the classroom.
Instructed Interactional Competence: Designing CA-inspired materials with the support of a professional development experience
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Silvia Kunitz, Karlstad University
Co-authors :
Katharina Kley, Rice University
This paper illustrates pedagogical materials targeting the development of L2 interactional competence. The teachers who designed these materials were exposed to conversation-analytic concepts and findings to help them identify teachables/learnables. The study has implications for syllabus and curriculum design, teacher education, and the diffusion of curricular innovation.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S029 1/2 | Critical Thinking and Language Integrated Teaching
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Youzhong Sun, Beijing Foreign Studies University
Yuqin Hei, Xi'an International Studies University
Yunian Xu, Presenter , Central South University
Shengkai Yin, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Xiaoli Liu, Harbin Institute Of Technology
Subrata Bhowmik, University Of Calgary
Shuyuan Liu, Queen's University
Suhair Al-Alami, Al Ghurair University
Hyesun Cho, Associate Professor , University Of Kansas
Yanning Dong, University Of British Columbia
Michele Carilo, Coordinator For The Portuguese Language Programme/Lecturer, Ohio State University
Yan Wang, Nanjing University
Valia Spiliotopoulos, Assistant Professor Of Teaching, University Of British Columbia
Yoshio Hoso, Waseda University Honjo Senior High School
Hong Zhang, National Research Centre For Foreign Language Education
Rui Yuan, Presenter , University Of Macau
Dr. Yilin Sun, Director, Faculty Development, Seattle Colleges
Limin Jin, Beijing Foreign Studies University
Lian Zhang, Beijing Foreign Studies University
Samar Almossa, Assistant Professor, Umm Al-Qura University
Yang Liu, Beijing Institute Of Technology
Youzhong Sun, Beijing Foreign Studies University
Mansour Almalki
Sahar Alzahrani , PI, Umm Alqura University
Moderators
Youzhong Sun, Beijing Foreign Studies University
Hong Zhang, National Research Centre For Foreign Language Education
Sara Razaghi AILA Volunteer, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
In EFL (English as a Foreign Language) countries, conventional ELT focused on language knowledge, skills and communicative competence. However, it has been recognized by many philosophers, psychologists, and applied linguists that language has a close relationship with thinking and cognition. As critical thinking is at the heart of tertiary education, developing critical thinking simultaneously in English language teaching (ELT) becomes vital for aspiring university students, and teachers around the world are encouraged to integrate critical thinking in ELT. Till now, little is known about teachers' and policy makers' conceptions, beliefs and practice about integrating critical thinking in ELT, and how critical thinking is conceived and realized in ELT, including curriculum, teaching methods and textbooks, varies considerably. This symposium addresses this issue by discussing the following questions: What is the relationship between language competence and critical thinking? Why is it necessary to integrate critical thinking in ELT? How can critical thinking pedagogy be realized in different ways in various contexts? Are there any educational reforms which attempt to engage critical thinking in ELT? Are there any challenges encountered in the reform? The discussions will offer valuable insights for developing both content and pedagogical knowledge of teaching critical thinking skills in ELT.
Critical Thinking in the 21st Century ELT Field – Research and Praxis
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Dr. Yilin Sun, Director, Faculty Development, Seattle Colleges
This talk addresses some hot topics: What are the skills needed for the 21st century and beyond? What is the role of critical thinking among those essential skills? How can ELT educators help students fully utilize critical thinking in learning and real-life applications? She’ll share research-based praxis and discuss implications/adaptations.
Contextualizing Cambridge Framework for Life Competencies in the EFL Context.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Samar Almossa, Assistant Professor, Umm Al-Qura University
Mansour Almalki
Sahar Alzahrani , PI, Umm Alqura University
Life competencies stand indispensable for the educated segment of any nation to guarantee its progress in the times to come. In ELT, our role, as well as our domain, expands a great deal. We are entrusted with not only teaching the language but also training our students on ways to develop their abilities and maximize their potentials.
Critical and Intercultural Pedagogies: a proposal for theoretical update within Portuguese as an Additional Language contexts
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Michele Carilo, Coordinator For The Portuguese Language Programme/Lecturer, Ohio State University
A presentation discussing the development process of a postgraduate course for Portuguese as an Additional Language teachers at Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul which was informed by Critical Pedagogy and Intercultural Pedagogy rather than the traditional pedagogies shaping the Celpe-Bras examination.
Integrating Language Learning and Critical Thinking in Business Education
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Valia Spiliotopoulos, Assistant Professor Of Teaching, University Of British Columbia
Co-authors :
Bong-gi Sohn, Post Doctoral Fellow, Simon Fraser University
This research presents findings that examine L2 students’development of critical thinking alongside language skills within the context of business education. Quantitative data on student performance in writing and critical thinking will be compared to qualitative data from the instructional team, as well as from students in the course
Critical Thinking in Two Languages: A Comparative Study of Critical Thinking Performance in Chinese University Students’ L1 and L2 Writing
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Yanning Dong, University Of British Columbia
This study compares 31 Chinese university students' critical thinking (CT) performance based on their articles written in English and Chinese respectively to examine the similarities and differences in students' CT performance when writing in two different languages and to explore the roles of the two languages in their CT development.
Critical literacy in action: A case study of a Korean EFL high school classroom
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Hyesun Cho, Associate Professor , University Of Kansas
This study presents the process as well as the benefits and challenges of implementing critical literacy into the Korean EFL classroom. It challenges prevailing assumptions about lack of critical thinking skills among Asian EFL students due to their low English proficiency levels and cultural backgrounds. It concludes with suggestions for teachers who are interested in integrating critical literacy into their classrooms.
Integrating critical thinking with language education: Voices from pre-service language teachers
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Rui Yuan, Presenter , University Of Macau
This presentation demonstrates how pre-service language teachers perceived and taught critical thinking during their teaching practicum in different primary schools in Hong Kong. The findings revealed the personal and contextual challenges faced by the participants and how they overcame such challenges to integrate critical thinking with language education.
Investigating University EFL teachers’ perceptions of critical thinking and their teaching: Voices from China
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Hong Zhang, National Research Centre For Foreign Language Education
This study investigates university EFL teachers’ perceptions of CT and how two teachers integrated CT into language teaching. Findings indicate that CT should be an integral part of EFL curriculum, and that the opportunities for teachers to research into their practices helped their language teaching to develop students’ critical thinking.
Science Fiction films and Critical Literacies in EFL Classrooms
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Shuyuan Liu, Queen's University
This presentation outlines a film-based pilot study in an English as foreign language (EFL) class in China. The presenter proposes that intellectually substantive sci-fi films can develop students’ critical literacies via multiliteracy pedagogy and promote participation as global citizens. Implications regarding learners’ identities and power in class are also discussed.
Culture of writing: A critical stance proposed by multilingual EAP students
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Subrata Bhowmik, University Of Calgary
Anita Chaudhuri, University Of British Columbia
We explore critical thinking from the perspective of multilingual learners in EAP courses who recognize distinct academic culture of writing in a North American institution. Students are able to conceptualize their need for specific instruction. Therefore, critical inquiry must be part of writing instruction for a varied learning experience.
Critical Thinking in the EAP Classroom: A Case Study of Chinese Instructors’ Voice
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Xiaoli Liu, Harbin Institute Of Technology
This presentation reports on findings of a case study about how critical thinking skills were taught in an EAP class in China, through the blended learning and the project-based learning. And it offers cross-cultural explanations of Chinese EAP students’ critical thinking skills and a lack thereof from Chinese instructors’ perspectives.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S049 2/2 | English medium education in multilingual university settings: from research to policies
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Christa Van Der Walt, Presenter, Stellenbosch University
Caroline Clark, President University Language Centre, University Of Padova
Pat Moore, Pablo De Olavide University
Kyria Finardi, Professor- Researcher, Federal University Of Espirito Santo - UFES
Camilla Falk Rønne Nissen, University Of Copenhagen
Nils Olov Fors, Kanda University Of International Studies
David Rusaw, Jönköping University
Antonio Jimenez-Munoz, Lecturer In English, University Of Oviedo
Dogan Yuksel, Associate Professor, Kocaeli University
Moderators
Emma Dafouz, Symposium Co-chair, Complutense University
Ute Smit, Professor, University Of Vienna
Saskia Nijmeijer, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Medical Center Groningen
With the internationalisation of higher education (HE) in full swing, a large number of HE institutions world-wide offer localised forms of English-medium education (EME) for parts of their study programmes. Given the diversity of these multilingual educational settings, such language policies are complex in themselves. Following Spolsky (2004), policies combine (a) regulations taken explicitly or implicitly at various levels from supra-national bodies to university departments, (b) language practices enacted, for instance, in classrooms or institutional meetings, and (c) the beliefs stakeholders hold about English and other relevant languages used for diverse communicational purposes. Concurrently, these multilingual educational realities have attracted a considerable amount of applied linguistic research, investigating, for instance, teaching and learning practices, participant ideas and wider institutional developments. What is still largely missing, however, is that research directly inform policy development and implementation. Despite ample studies, English-medium education policies are often still developed without benefitting to the full from situated and evidence-based findings. It is the aim of this symposium to foreground the potential that research holds for EME policy development and to place centre-stage cases where EME research has had an impact on relevant policies, whether regulation, belief or practice at a macro, meso or micro level.S049 detailed programme, click here
Translanguaging: A bridge too far in higher education?
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Christa Van Der Walt, Presenter, Stellenbosch University
This featured presentation focuses on academic writing policy and practice in the context of multilingual higher education. Based on student attitudes and composing strategies, it will be problematized to what extent translanguaging can be a solution to the challenges of academic writing
Language Policy as a result of EME - how linguistic research can influence governance
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Caroline Clark, President University Language Centre, University Of Padova
This paper discusses how a University Language Policy was devised from research into EME, and analyses the broad range of implications of the policy in University Governance
The Footprints of Research in University Language Policies
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Pat Moore, Pablo De Olavide University
Kyria Finardi, Professor- Researcher, Federal University Of Espirito Santo - UFES
A comparison of the language policies of two public universities (in Brazil and Spain). Both universities were prompted to draw up policies by national initiatives related to the internationalisation of higher education and we explore the extent to which these policies have been informed by research.
Blind spots of internationalization of higher education
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Camilla Falk Rønne Nissen, University Of Copenhagen
This paper looks at classroom practices as products of faculty level policy. It takes it outset in three different courses taught as parts of English medium programs at different faculties of the University of Copenhagen to discuss how motivations for university internationalization should be thought-about in the light of classroom realities.
Language-conscious practices: Developing training and support for students and faculty in an English-taught program at a Swedish university
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Nils Olov Fors, Kanda University Of International Studies
David Rusaw, Jönköping University
This paper reports on a study of the implementation of an English-taught program at a university in Sweden. The study describes the development of language-conscious courses and pedagogy, and documents and analyzes the lived experience of students and faculty members in the program.
Dissecting EMEMUS outcomes: University-wide evidence of the impact of beliefs and practices on student achievement
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Antonio Jimenez-Munoz, Lecturer In English, University Of Oviedo
This paper analyses nine years of anonymized student and lecturer records and backgrounds to find that while English-Medium generally outperforms L1 instruction, excellence is rarer due to linguistic factors. Such negative effect is lessened in cases where lecturers promote active learning and show awareness of linguistic and pedagogical affordances.
Comparing motivations and satisfaction levels of international and home students in an EMI context
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Dogan Yuksel, Associate Professor, Kocaeli University
Understanding motivation and satisfaction levels of home and international EMI students students may help understand globally growing EMI phenomenon. With these implications in mind, this study aimed to examine the motivation and satisfaction levels of international and home students in the EMI context, conveniently sampling eight Turkish universities.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S050 | Enhancing child first and second language development: Implications and applications of usage-based research for language teaching, training, and assessment
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Danielle Matthews, Reader In Cognitive Development, University Of Sheffield
Thorsten Piske, Full Professor, University Of Erlangen-Nuremberg
Boo Kyung Jung, University Of Pittsburgh
Jessica Heintges, TU Dortmund University
Alexa Okrainec, Associate Professor , Brandon University
Sirkku Lesonen, University Of Jyväskylä
Karin Madlener-Charpentier, University Of Basel, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Moderators
Karin Madlener-Charpentier, University Of Basel, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Heike Behrens, University Of Basel
Lilly Göthe - AILA Volunteer, Volunteer, University Of Groningen
Usage-based approaches to language have changed the way we think about learning processes: Rather than thinking of input as trigger for pre-specified linguistic representations, the current consensus is that language structure emerges gradually as an abstraction over the input, with essential roles, e.g., for formulaic language and negotiation. Research indicates huge individual differences in learning outcomes, largely depending on amounts of exposure and interaction, both in first and second languages. Moreover, the cues learners need for generalization change in the course of language development, with younger learners needing more contextualized and situated interaction than older learners. Which implications and applications do basic research insights have for options and programs of language teaching, language assessment, and special language training? For instance, how can we maximize learning opportunities and enhance learning conditions for different age groups (focusing on preschoolers/primary school) in different contexts (e.g., early foreign language learning)? What are consequences for language learning in multilingual settings (e.g., minority language students, basic/academic language and content learning in multilingual classrooms)? What are commonalities and possible synergies between usage-based research in first language acquisition and second/foreign language learning/teaching?ScheduleThis panel is planned as a live session. All talks will be given live. Please join by clicking on the „Join" button top right.The program is a as follows:2.30 pm Welcome & Intro2.35 pm Featured talk (and discussion), L1 perspective, by Danielle Matthews3.15 pm Featured talk (and discussion), L2 perspective, by Thorsten Piske4 pm coffee break4.30 pm Short inputs & discussions: 4.30 pm Alexa Okainec4.45 pm Sirkku Lesonen5.00 pm Jessica Heintges5.15 pm Boo Kyung Jung & Gyu-Ho Shin5.30 pm final discussion
The role of the caregiving environment in language learning during infancy: implications for intervention.
02:30PM - 07:00PM
Presented by :
Danielle Matthews, Reader In Cognitive Development, University Of Sheffield
This presentation reports studies of infants at risk of language delay due to low socio-economic status or deafness, and provides evidence regarding 1) the mechanisms of early language development 2) the feasibility and acceptability of caregiver interventions and 3) the efficacy of such interventions.
Implications of second language research for the foreign language classroom
02:30PM - 07:00PM
Presented by :
Thorsten Piske, Full Professor, University Of Erlangen-Nuremberg
This paper will present the results of a number of studies showing that identifying linguistic and subject variables significantly affecting immigrants’ performance in an L2 may also provide important indications as to how the effectiveness of foreign language teaching can be increased.
Revealing input-output relation in second language development: Textbook and learner writing for L2 beginners of Korean
02:30PM - 07:00PM
Presented by :
Boo Kyung Jung, University Of Pittsburgh
Gyu-Ho Shin, Assistant Professor, Palacky University Olomouc
We investigate how a textbook as input is composed and how L2 beginners' written production as output is affected by the distributional properties of the textbook. We found supportive evidence for input-output relations in L2 development, as well as cross-linguistic influences on the course of acquiring target language knowledge.
Deriving bases for a revision of L2 didacticization of the German lexeme so from children’s L1 acquisition and application process
02:30PM - 07:00PM
Presented by :
Jessica Heintges, TU Dortmund University
This study looks at German L1 pre-kindergarden children's acquisition of the lexeme so and the development of its versatile usage to revise the currently inchoate didactic path for the L2 classroom. A pragmatic, usage-based analysis provides information to teach form and function of so in spoken discourse.
Conflict Talk Exchanges and Their Role in Language Acquisition
02:30PM - 07:00PM
Presented by :
Alexa Okrainec, Associate Professor , Brandon University
The presenter advances the position that children engage in ‘conflict talk’ exchanges through which information about the meaning, structure, and usage of language become available to the child. The presenter showcases research supporting the notion that conflict may inform language learning. Assessment strategies for examining children’s conflicts will be showcased.
Developing L2 Finnish constructions in an instructional setting: a dynamic usage-based approach
02:30PM - 07:00PM
Presented by :
Sirkku Lesonen, University Of Jyväskylä
Co-authors :
Rasmus Steinkrauss, AILA 2021 Committee - Treasurer, University Of Groningen
Minna Suni, University Of Jyväskylä
Marjolijn Verspoor, Chair AILA Organizing Committee And Mentor, University Of Groningen
In this paper, we show with the longitudinal data collected with four beginner learners of L2 Finnish how both bottom-up and top-down processes are used and how they interact when learners are developing their L2. We discuss how the pedagogical interventions seem to affect the interplay between these two processes.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S066 2/2 | International perspectives on educational models for newly immigrated (refugee) children, adolescents, and young adults: Options, challenges & best practices
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Martha Bigelow, University Of Minnesota
Stefanie Bredthauer, University Of Cologne
Nora Von Dewitz, University Of Cologne
Fíodhna Gardiner-Hyland, Presenter, Mary Immaculate College | Univeristy Of Limerick, Ireland
Leslie Moore, Presenter, Ohio State University
Rahat Zaidi, Professor & Chair Language & Literacy, University Of Calgary
Moderators
Karin Madlener-Charpentier, University Of Basel, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Nicole Schumacher, Mentor, Humboldt University Of Berlin
Andrea Ender, University Of Salzburg
Laura Nap (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer, NHL Stenden University Of Applied Siences
Educational systems all over the world face the challenges of migration, diversity, and multilingualism. How can educational needs of refugees as well as newly immigrated children, adolescents, and young adults in general be met in order to provide longer-term opportunities of integration and participation? Which types of educational models have been devised for different age groups and for newcomers with varying pre-migration schooling experiences, and how successfully? Which are the major challenges for language acquisition and content teaching? For instance, how can the teaching of subject matters be introduced such that content teaching provides opportunities for language learning even at low proficiency/literacy levels, and how can multiligualism be used as a learning/teaching resource? How can transitions to regular educational programs be scaffolded and continuous language training be ensured? This symposium brings together experts in refugee education, second language learning/teaching research, and multilingualism, focusing on educational options, challenges, best practices, and implications for linguistically diverse classrooms more generally. Strand (1): educational models and challenges, pre-migration schooling, and managing transitions (featured speaker: Prof. Martha Bigelow); strand (2): literacy, academic language proficiency, content and language learning, and heterogeneous classrooms (featured speaker: Prof. Nicole Marx).S066 detailed programme, click here.
Multilingual pedagogical approaches in classes for newcomer students in Germany
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Stefanie Bredthauer, University Of Cologne
Nora Von Dewitz, University Of Cologne
In Germany, separate classes for newcomer students are very common. In these learning groups the diversity of multilingual resources is extremely high due to a multiplicity of heritage and foreign languages on different skill levels. How can they be used as a learning and teaching resource?
What’s Additional? Four Issues for Teachers of EAL Learners in Changing Irish Primary Schools.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Fíodhna Gardiner-Hyland, Presenter, Mary Immaculate College | Univeristy Of Limerick, Ireland
Co-authors :
Maria Rydell, Stockholm University
This presentation will offer insights from research into the evolving status of language and literacy support provision for children with EAL in mainstream Irish schools and the inherent issues for primary teachers, at a time when a language curriculum and Special Education allocation model is being introduced across the country.
Informal science education for preschool dual language learners
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Leslie Moore, Presenter, Ohio State University
This poster reports on a multi-year, multi-institution project that explored the potential of informal science education to engage dual language learners (DLLs) and their families in multilingual early childhood educational contexts.
A Canadian perspective on the educational systems/curriculum designed to support refugees: Ways to optimize parent-teacher collaborations
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Rahat Zaidi, Professor & Chair Language & Literacy, University Of Calgary
The global political climate has created an unprecedented influx of refugees entering Canada and Canadian schools. This study explores the complex relationship between refugee families and their childrens’ schools, exploring both informal and formal ways to optimize parent-teacher collaboration, accessibility, and existing communications channels between all stakeholders.
Learning in English in a Djiboutian refugee camp for an uncertain English speaking future
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Martha Bigelow, University Of Minnesota
This talk will showcase the language policies and practices of a Djiboutian refugee camp with an eyewitness account. Instructional materials will be explored through post-colonial literature, through the lens of imagined community, and investment (Norton). These theoretical frames will help trouble the idealistic, imagined or imposed identities the children in the refugee camp must cope with in the (neo)colonial/liberal realities of today.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S068 | Internationalization, digitization and the changing language and literacy landscapes of universities
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Karin Tusting, Lancaster University
Luke Holmes, Doctoral Student, Stockholm University
Audra Skukauskaite, Klaipeda University And University Of Central Florida
Andrea Mattos, Associate Professor, Universidade Federal De Minas Gerais
Izabel Magalhães, Federal University Of Goiás | University Of Brasilia
Cloris Porto Torquato, State University Of Ponta Grossa
Marilyn Martin-Jones, Moderator, University Of Birmingham
Moderators
Marilyn Martin-Jones, Moderator, University Of Birmingham
Far-reaching changes are taking place in the language and literacy landscapes of universities, along with the current policy shifts towards internationalization of higher education and greater digitization. There is now a growing body of research into the ways in which these policy shifts are taking place in university settings beyond the anglophone world of higher education. The aim of this symposium is to take stock of the insights that have been gleaned from studies that have been conducted in different universities, in the global north and south, where languages other than English have traditionally been the main media of instruction. In particular, we will be addressing the issues raised by the increasing use and production of texts in English, online and offline, in different areas of university life: in research and knowledge-building and in teaching and learning (in different disciplines). The focus of the symposium will be on research of a critical, ethnographic nature. The first part will deal with changes in language and literacy practices and uses of texts in teaching and learning; and the second part will deal with changes related to research and knowledge-building.
Navigating the changing literacy demands of the contemporary university
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Karin Tusting, Lancaster University
This paper describes how academics in UK universities navigate the changes they experience in language and literacy demands, driven by changes in the higher education environment such as managerialism and digitisation. It explores the tensions generated by these changes and reflects on their impact on the academic workplace.
Administration, Internationalisation, and Ethics: Moving towards multilingual language policy with ‘on the ground’ acts of hospitality
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Luke Holmes, Doctoral Student, Stockholm University
This presentation will explore the ethical challenges faced by administrative support staff in negotiating their communicative practices at an internationalising Swedish university. The study presented promises to contribute towards debate surrounding language planning for internationalising Higher Education in Sweden and beyond.
Internationalization and the changing research literacy landscape in Lithuania
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Audra Skukauskaite, Klaipeda University And University Of Central Florida
Liudmila Rupsiene, Professor, Klaipeda University
Judith Green, Featured Speaker And Presenter , Klaipeda University And University Of California Santa Barbara
The paper explores opportunities and challenges internationalization in higher education has posed for Lithuanian education researchers seeking to learn new qualitative and ethnographic research approaches. The focus is learning of interactional ethnographic epistemology within a 4-year EU funded project.
Literacy and Techno-Linguistic Biographies of Academics in a Brazilian University
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Izabel Magalhães, Federal University Of Goiás | University Of Brasilia
With the current policy of internationalization of federal universities in Brazil, there have been far-reaching changes. Before the internationalization policy, the main academic language was Portuguese, but now there is a growing shift to English. This paper focuses on the orientation of one particular university to the global context, in relation to the language and literacy practices of academic staff. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the changing language and literacy practices, and techno-linguistic biographies of academics in Brazilian university life from a critical, ethnographic perspective. 
The linguistic landscape of two universities in the Global South in the context of internationalization
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Cloris Porto Torquato, State University Of Ponta Grossa
This paper presents ongoing research in two universities in the Global South, in South Africa and Brazil. The research falls in the field of Linguistic Ethnography. I focus here on the linguistic landscapes of the universities, online and offline. My analysis of the data is guided by a Bakhtinian approach.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S069 | Investigating complexity in L2 phraseology: methods and applications
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Magali Paquot, FNRS | UCLouvain
Gabriela Bruhová, Charles University
Sugene Kim, Nagoya University Of Commerce & Business
Nathan Vandeweerd, PhD Student, UCLouvain | Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Luciana Forti, Researcher And Lecturer, University For Foreigners Of Perugia
Irene Fioravanti, Post-doctoral Fellowship, University For Foreigners Of Perugia
Maria Roccaforte, Assistant Professor, Università Sapienza Of Rome
Marco S. G. Senaldi, Postdoctoral Researcher, McGill University
Suhad Sonbul, Assistant Professor , Umm Al-Qura University
Moderators
Irene Fioravanti, Post-doctoral Fellowship, University For Foreigners Of Perugia
Luciana Forti, Researcher And Lecturer, University For Foreigners Of Perugia
Maria Roccaforte, Assistant Professor, Università Sapienza Of Rome
Rosmawati AILA VOLUNTEER, Postdoctoral Researcher, The University Of Sydney
Over the past few decades, numerous studies have shed light on the key role that phraseological units play in the development of second language competence. In this respect, phraseological units have been considered not only in relation to their structural and semantic features, but also in relation to their degree of sophistication, which is commonly associated to the notion of complexity. The available empirical evidence on L2 phraseological complexity, however, stems from either learner corpus research (LCR) or psycholinguistics, with only very rare overlaps in terms of the specific phraseological unit being considered. This symposium aims to bring together specialists from number of different subfields within the discipline of Applied Linguistics, in order to reflect on the different kinds of methods that can be mixed in order to obtain a unified picture of phraseological complexity in second language learning. Specialists in LCR and psycholinguistics are particularly welcome. The symposium will be relevant not only to scholars interested in investigating phraseological complexity in the development of second language competence, but also to those working on bridging the gap between linguistic research and its application to syllabus design and test development.
Measures of phraseological complexity: reliability and validity
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Magali Paquot, FNRS | UCLouvain
The main aim of this study is to assess the validity of measures of phraseological complexity by exploring whether theoretically similar measures of phraseological diversity and sophistication are related to each other (convergent validity) but are very different from traditional measures of lexical and syntactic complexity (discriminant validity) in a variety of learner corpora.
Investigating frequent lexical bundles in academic writing: the onomasiological approach
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Gabriela Bruhová, Charles University
Co-authors :
Katerina Vasku, Charles University
The paper compares four-word lexical bundles in novice academic texts (undergraduate theses) in the field of economics written by Czech learners of English and native speakers. Our aim is to explore whether the problem of phraseological complexity measure can be tackled by the use of the onomasiological approach.
The phraseology of the linking adverbial 'besides'
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Sugene Kim, Nagoya University Of Commerce & Business
This study examines the phraseology of the linking adverbial “besides” to unravel why, unlike similar-meaning transitions such as “in addition,” it sounds unnatural in some contexts. Analysis of written English corpora and grammar reference materials suggests that its natural use is regulated by the negativity-conditioned nature of the preceding statement.
The longitudinal development of phraseological complexity in oral and written L2 French
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Nathan Vandeweerd, PhD Student, UCLouvain | Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Co-authors :
Alex Housen, Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Magali Paquot, FNRS | UCLouvain
This study compares the diversity (number of types) and sophistication (PMI) of adjectival modifier (adjective + noun) and direct object (verb + noun) relations between oral and written tasks completed over a period of 21-months. In general, written tasks were found to be more phraseologically complex than spoken tasks and productions at the end of the study period were found to be slightly more phraseologically sophisticated as compared to productions at the beginning. However the developmental trends differed across tasks, highlighting the important role that task characteristics play in measures of phraseological complexity.
Mixing data in developing phraseological complexity measures for Italian L2: from integration to application
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Luciana Forti, Researcher And Lecturer, University For Foreigners Of Perugia
Maria Roccaforte, Assistant Professor, Università Sapienza Of Rome
Irene Fioravanti, Post-doctoral Fellowship, University For Foreigners Of Perugia
This presentation describes the first stages of a 3-year collaborative research project aimed at integrating eye-tracking and corpus-based data in the development of phraseological complexity measures in the context of Italian L2 teaching.
Eye-tracking in the study of L2 phraseology: a state-of-the-art review of the method and findings
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Irene Fioravanti, Post-doctoral Fellowship, University For Foreigners Of Perugia
Maria Roccaforte, Assistant Professor, Università Sapienza Of Rome
Is the eye-tracking research methodology useful to investigate phraseological units? In this study, we analyze three studies that have employed eye tracking methodology in the context of phraseological processing in order to demonstrate that the eye-tracking paradigm can be a crucial research tool in this domain.
Lexical fixedness and compositionality in L1 and L2 speakers’ intuitions about Italian word combinations: A psycholinguistic and computational study
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Marco S. G. Senaldi, Postdoctoral Researcher, McGill University
Co-authors :
Irene Fioravanti, Post-doctoral Fellowship, University For Foreigners Of Perugia
The present study investigates whether lexical fixedness and compositionality play a role in L1 and L2 speakers’ intuitions about Italian word combinations. Data from an acceptability and a lexical choice task were analysed using psycholinguistic and computational indices. The present research presents new insights into L1 and L2 phraseology.
How fat is a ‘fat cat’? The processing and learning of duplex collocations
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Suhad Sonbul, Assistant Professor , Umm Al-Qura University
Co-authors :
Anna Siyanova-Chanturia, Senior Lecturer, Victoria University Of Wellington
Marijana Macis, Lecturer, Manchester Metropolitan University
Research on ambiguous idioms has mainly explored L1 processing. The effect of sense-specific frequency has not yet been examined in L1 or L2. This two-experiment study investigates how L1 speakers process duplex collocations (Experiment 1) and how L2 learners acquire them (Experiment 2), with implications for idiom processing theories.  
Is “keep a promise” the same as “retain a promise”? The role of lexical fixedness in word combination processing
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Irene Fioravanti, Post-doctoral Fellowship, University For Foreigners Of Perugia
Co-authors :
Marco Senaldi, University Of Pisa
We investigated the processing of free combinations and collocations, which differ in lexical fixedness. Eye movements of L1 and L2 speakers of Italian were recorded while they read target sequences embedded in context. The degree of lexical fixedness and leaners’ proficiency were found to affect the processing of word combinations.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S080 | Language learning through language content: Rediscovering our subject
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Wander Lowie, University Of Groningen
Ingo Feldhausen, ATILF-CNRS & Université De Lorraine (France)
Liz Dale, Senior Lecturer, Researcher And Teacher Educator, Amsterdam University Of Applied Sciences
Kevin Sprague, Duke Kunshan University
Ruth Koro, Assistant Professor In Modern Languages Education, University Of Nottingham
Tomokazu Ishikawa, Assistant Professor, Tamagawa University
Robert Walldén, Associate Professor In Language Arts Education, Malmö University
Tessa Mearns, Leiden University
Do Coyle, Chair In Language Education And Classroom Pedagogies, University Of Edinburgh
Moderators
Bert Le Bruyn, Utrecht University
Tessa Mearns, Leiden University
Niklas Abel, AILA 2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
In an era in which we are increasingly aware of the value of encouraging near-authentic communication in the language classroom (Lowie, 2018), we are surrounded by approaches, models and principles that propose ways in which content-driven teaching can enhance language learning. In content and language integrated learning (CLIL) and immersion approaches, teachers of other curriculum subjects take on responsibility for also supporting language acquisition, with or without the help of language teachers. In content-based language teaching (CBLT), task-based and 'soft-CLIL' approaches (Bentley, 2010), language teachers employ content as a vehicle to language learning. What the latter models do not address, however, is the question of which content this might be. Language as an academic discipline is concerned not only with communicative skills but also with the mastery of relevant language-specific specific content, for example in the form of literature, media, linguistics or (inter)cultural issues. This symposium will bring together research and practice in which content-driven language education focuses not on content from other disciplines, but on the content of language. It will address the questions of what that content might be, how it can be integrated with language learning and the potential impact of content-rich language education within the curriculum.
Content-driven language education: proposals for a new curriculum
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Wander Lowie, University Of Groningen
The major single focus of language pedagogy tends to be on developing language skills. Although language proficiency is an obvious objective, language pedagogy can benefit from relevant content that brings about invaluable cultural awareness and language awareness.
Teaching of the Spanish subjunctive in Germany
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ingo Feldhausen, ATILF-CNRS & Université De Lorraine (France)
Co-authors :
Kim Biedebach, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt
We analyze how the linguistic phenomenon of the subjunctive is taught in the language classroom and we argue that the teaching might benefit from providing deep insights of the subjunctive accumulated in the scientific field of linguistics by means of addressing the function of the subjunctive explicitly in the classroom.
Why literature? Language teachers’ subject-specific beliefs and practices in a CLIL context
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Liz Dale, Senior Lecturer, Researcher And Teacher Educator, Amsterdam University Of Applied Sciences
Research into how and why language teachers use literature as content is presented to explore one aspect of various pedagogical and collaborative practices open to language teachers in CLIL contexts. Language teachers’ beliefs and practices are examined based on a literature review, focus group study, survey, and multiple-case study.
'Motivated' content integration: Reflections on developing a CLIL course with language learning motivation as the content
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Kevin Sprague, Duke Kunshan University
Co-authors :
Kristin Hiller, Associate Director, Language And Culture Center; Assistant Professor, Duke Kunshan University
Emmanuelle Chiocca, Assistant Professor Of Applied Linguistics And Culture, Duke Kunshan University
This presentation describes the CLIL approach taken in undergraduate English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses at a Sino-US joint venture university in China. Language serves as the content in a course designed to help freshmen meet the challenges of EMI in the liberal arts curriculum.
There is content in language already! Redefining content and language integration through the (inter)cultural lens.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ruth Koro, Assistant Professor In Modern Languages Education, University Of Nottingham
This paper proposes that language teachers need not rely on ‘borrowed’ content – when a wealth of culturally-relevant content already exists through the language being taught. Taking a trans-disciplinary approach through the lens of the language’s culture can provide rich, engaging and importantly, relevant content, and contribute to learners’ intercultural understanding.
Disciplinary Literacies: Rethinking the role of the language teacher as a disciplinary expert and middle school learners as literary writers
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Do Coyle, Chair In Language Education And Classroom Pedagogies, University Of Edinburgh
Co-authors :
Mary Chopey-Paquet, University Of Namur
Experimenting with an ecological approach to Pluriliteracies Teaching for Deeper Learning, this innovative, longitudinal study charts how a language teacher radically shifted ways of working with middle school learners of French – including beginners – to develop academic literacies across languages. Being and becoming ‘expert literary writers’ resulted in unprecedented outcomes.
English as a Lingua Franca research in Japan as a ground for English Medium Instruction
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Tomokazu Ishikawa, Assistant Professor, Tamagawa University
The presenter discusses how English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) research informs English Medium Instruction (EMI), drawing on his research on the awareness of English-within-multilingualism and taking Tamagawa University's Center for ELF as an example. He also suggests the possibility of conjoining ELT and EMI courses as an ELF programme.
Negotiating metaphors, narrative structure and linguistic style: classroom work with literature in adult second language instruction
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Robert Walldén, Associate Professor In Language Arts Education, Malmö University
This presentation will be dedicated to an underexplored form of disciplinary literacy practice: classroom work with literature in adult second-language instruction. I will show how the teachers and the intermediate language learners use linguistic resources while negotiating content knowledge about metaphors, narrative structure and linguistic style.
Exploring teacher support for a content and language integrated modern languages curriculum
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Tessa Mearns, Leiden University
This presentation explores the idea of integrating language-related content into the Modern Foreign Languages curriculum from the perspective of the teacher. Based on data gathered during a professional development project, teachers’ understanding of and response to the idea of MFL ‘content’ will be presented and implications discussed.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S091 2/4 | Learning through leisure: Informal Second Language Learning in the 21st century
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Mark Dressman, Khalifa University
Alexandra Schurz, University Of Vienna
Marcus Warnby, Stockholm University
Marlene Schwarz, University Of Vienna
Andrew Moffat, University Of Nottingham
Stefanie Cajka, University Of Vienna
Pia Sundqvist, University Of Oslo
Moderators
Denyze TOFFOLI, Symposium Organiser, Mentor, University Of Toulouse
Henriette Arndt, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Lund University
Marlene Schwarz, University Of Vienna
Meryl Kusyk, Karlsruhe University Of Education
Luisa Valesquez , AILA2021 Volunteer
The last 10 years have seen the birth of a new field within applied linguistics, embracing all sorts of language acquisition outside the classroom. With the rapid development and spread of new technologies, informal language contact has become commonplace for many L2 learners. While this can take many different forms, online contexts are a major driving force because they present L2 learners with unprecedented opportunities for exposure to and use of target language(s) regardless of their physical location. Research on this topic has emerged concurrently from diverse contexts. As a result, a variety of terms have been used to describe it (including Extramural English, Informal Digital Learning of English or Online Informal Learning of English), each of which emphasises particular aspects of the informal practices studied. Early research tended to focus on English as a target language, but more recently research on other languages is becoming more prominent. The purpose of this symposium, organized by Denyze Toffoli and colleagues, is to bring together researchers working on informal L2 practices to engage in critical dialogue about the scope of this field and to share their diverse theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches and findings. Our featured speakers are Geoffrey Sockett, Mark Dressman and Phil Benson.
After TESOL: Models of Language Education for an IDLE Generation
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Mark Dressman, Khalifa University
IDLE-the Informal Digital Learning of English-has proven to be a very powerful practice for learning English outside of classroom instruction. What does this mean for traditional TESOL approaches, given the rise of EMI programs internationally? This presentation suggests new models of English education in EMI universities based on five principles taken from the study of IDLE.
Instructed and out-of-class English and the impact on implicit and explicit knowledge: The case of Austrian and Swedish ESL learners
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Alexandra Schurz, University Of Vienna
In this study, the impact of in- and out-of-class L2 English on implicit and/or automatized and explicit grammar knowledge was explored. 213 Austrian and Swedish ESL learners (age 13-14) performed measures of implicit and/or automatized and explicit knowledge (aural and written TGJT, ONT, EIT, UGJT, MKT). The type of instruction learners received and their use of spare time English was gauged through learner and teacher surveys.
Do leisure activities promote upper secondary students’ acquisition of academic vocabulary?
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Marcus Warnby, Stockholm University
Language driven leisure activities aid language acquisition in general, but do certain such activities promote more specific language registers, such as English for academic purposes? Using quantitative analyses, the paper investigates the relationship between upper secondary students' (N≈800) receptive academic vocabulary knowledge and their different language media activities outside school.
Students’ perspectives on extramural English and its relationship to English language teaching
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Marlene Schwarz, University Of Vienna
Giving room to the voices of learners as the most important stakeholders in informal language learning processes, this paper provides insights into Austrian teenagers’ perceptions of extramural English, informal learning outside school, and the link between out-of-school English practices and English teaching at school, before drawing conclusions for ‘EE-sensitive’ teaching.
On 'not spoiling the fun': integrating online L2 English use in classroom learning.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Andrew Moffat, University Of Nottingham
This presentation explores English teaching practices that utilise and support learners' out-of-class English use, particularly communicative interaction enabled by the Internet. Activity theory is used to construct formal and informal learning as interlinked activity systems, with language awareness utilised as a tool to enhance noticing.
Linguistic Risk-Taking and Informal Language Learning: From Canada to Austria
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Stefanie Cajka, University Of Vienna
Co-authors :
Ed Griffiths
Nikolay Slavkov, University Of Ottawa
Eva Vetter, Mentor, University Of Vienna
The construct of linguistic risk-taking offers innovative informal language-learning opportunities for English/French (Linguistic Risk-Taking Passport developed in Canada) and German ('Riskier was!' Booklet developed in Austria) designed to foster authentic and autonomous language use outside the classroom. We present interview data findings pointing to considerable benefits of a digital risk-taking app.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S099 2/3 | Multilingual education or how to learn to teach multilingual learning
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
James Cummins, Presenter, University Of Toronto
Julie Kerekes, University Of Toronto
Shakina Rajendram, Co-Author, OISE/University Of Toronto
Mama Adjetey-Nii Owoo, Co-Author, OISE/University Of Toronto
Yiran Zhang, Co-Author, OISE/University Of Toronto
Lukas Bleichenbacher, St.Gallen University Of Teacher Education
Wilfrid Kuster, Director Of The Institute For Language Teacher Education , St.Gallen University Of Teacher Education
Meike Wernicke, Assistant Professor, University Of British Columbia
Gabrijela Aleksic, University Of Luxembourg
Susan Ballinger, McGill University
Euline Cutrim Schmid, Professor, University Of Education Schwäbisch Gmünd
Diane Potts, Lancaster University
Lavinia Hirsu, University Of Glasgow
Sílvia Melo-Pfeifer, University Of Hamburg
Sviatlana Karpava, University Of Cyprus
Moderators
Eva Vetter, Mentor, University Of Vienna
Nikolay Slavkov, University Of Ottawa
Marita Everhardt (AILA2021 Volunteer), PhD Student, University Of Groningen / University Medical Center Groningen
Around the world multilingual learning arrangements have evolved over several decades with the aim of enhancing equity in education. More recently a growing body of research has not only produced a myriad of concepts (plurilingualism, translanguaging, metro-, poly- and other -lingualisms) but also valuable insights into the complexities of multilingual learning and teaching, coupled with calls for continuous pedagogical, institutional, and technological innovation to address these complexities. The significant contributions, changing roles, and professional development of teachers have also recently come to the forefront. At the same time, statistics indicate that plurilingual learners face more obstacles for their academic success than those who are categorized as monolingual students (OECD, 2018). This symposium addresses multilingual teaching, learning and innovation as relevant challenges for Applied Linguistics connecting research from different fields within the discipline. Two sub-themes are proposed: 1) teaching and learning for/in multilingual contexts; and 2) teacher education. Sub-theme one raises questions about facets of multilingual learning and teaching and addresses e.g. biographical, discursive and contextual aspects. Sub-theme two focuses upon teaching competence and its development and asks how teacher beliefs, perceptions and attitudes influence learning to teach in and for multilingual contexts.S099 detailed programme, click here
Evaluating Theoretical Constructs in Multilingual Education: Empirical Credibility, Logical Coherence, and Consequential Validity
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
James Cummins, Presenter, University Of Toronto
Three criteria are proposed for evaluating the legitimacy of theoretical claims in multilingual education: (a) empirical credibility--to what extent is the claim consistent with research evidence? (b) logical coherence—to what extent is the claim internally consistent? (c) consequential validity—to what extent does the claim promote effective pedagogy?
Learning to Support English Learners in Ontario: A Comparative Analysis of Teacher-Education Programs
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Julie Kerekes, University Of Toronto
Shakina Rajendram, Co-Author, OISE/University Of Toronto
Mama Adjetey-Nii Owoo, Co-Author, OISE/University Of Toronto
Yiran Zhang, Co-Author, OISE/University Of Toronto
Co-authors :
Antoinette Gagné, University Of Toronto
Ontario's recently instigated policy enhancing educational outcomes for diverse learners necessitates that pre-service programs provide teacher candidates with explicit instruction in supporting multilingual learners across the curriculum (Ontario College of Teachers, 2014). There is little agreement, however, about how the necessary skills and dispositions should be taught. Using documentary research methods and interviews, this presentation compares interview and website data from Ontario's 16 accredited teacher-education programs to examine how they are interpreting and implementing the policy. Findings exemplify institutions' diverse ways of responding to the policy and their growing but incomplete endeavours to adequately support multilingual learners.
Plurilingual professionalization: Insights from the implementation of an intensively plurilingual teacher education curriculum
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Lukas Bleichenbacher, St.Gallen University Of Teacher Education
Wilfrid Kuster, Director Of The Institute For Language Teacher Education , St.Gallen University Of Teacher Education
Co-authors :
Christof Chesini, St. Gallen University Of Teacher Education
Mara De Zanet, St. Gallen University Of Teacher Education
The presentation will present insights from the implementation of a plurilingual lower secondary teacher education curriculum characterized by intensive use of various foreign languages by lecturers and students. The aim is to equip future language teachers with intensive learning opportunities including, but not limited to plurilingual classroom methodology.
Teaching for multilingualism: Teacher identity, language ideology, and current conceptions in second language teacher education
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Meike Wernicke, Assistant Professor, University Of British Columbia
In this paper I consider the different ways FSL teachers understand bilingualism and translingual practices in initial and continuing teacher education and how their conceptions of bi-/multilingual identity intersect with their understandings of multilingual pedagogies and their own linguistic and professional identities.
A professional development course in translanguaging: Teachers’ beliefs and attitudes
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Gabrijela Aleksic, University Of Luxembourg
To support preschool teachers with applying the new law that declared multilingual early education mandatory in Luxembourg, we offered a professional development course in translanguaging pedagogy over the course of 6 months. The results from teacher questionnaires and focus groups show that there has been some positive change towards children's home languages, however, for some teachers a monolingual stance remains unchanged.
University course instructors’ perspectives and practices in working with international multilingual students
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Susan Ballinger, McGill University
This study measured the impact of a training intervention on subject teachers’ language awareness (TLA). Subject teachers from multilingual classrooms in France (N = 30) participated in daylong workshops and were given a month to practice the new methods. TLA was measured through questionnaires, videorecorded workshop observations, and focus groups.
Projects, tasks and ideological change: Plurilingual practice in language teacher education
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Diane Potts, Lancaster University
Euline Cutrim Schmid, Professor, University Of Education Schwäbisch Gmünd
Drawing on data from an innovative pedagogic project involving young learners, German student-teachers and MA students at a British university, this paper examines the interplay of identities, belief systems and ideologies as participants engaged in interlinked tasks focused on use of their plurilingual resources. Implications for teacher education are discussed.
Supporting language student-teachers to move towards a translingual approach
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Lavinia Hirsu, University Of Glasgow
Co-authors :
Sally Zacharias, University Of Glasgow
This presentation offers an innovative methodological and pedagogical approach to translanguaging developed with TESOL student-teachers. Building on metaphor theory and analysis, the presenters will share practical ideas on how to help student-teachers develop new metaphors for their teaching classroom practices and language ideologies in line with a translingual approach.
Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Plurilingual Wolf? Teaching anxiety among foreign language student-teachers with and without migrant background
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Sílvia Melo-Pfeifer, University Of Hamburg
This contribution analyses and compares teaching anxieties (self-centered, task-centered and student-centered anxiety) of non-native foreign language student-teachers, with and without migrant backgrounds. Three variables will be closely considered: the target foreign language (French or Spanish), the background (migrant or not), and the declared mother tongue(s).
Development of translanguaging pedagogical practice in Cyprus
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Sviatlana Karpava, University Of Cyprus
This study investigates translanguaging practices of Russian-CG bilingual children at home, school and in the society. Classroom observations showed that their children, students in bilingual Russian-Cypriot Greek classes alternate languages. Russian-speaking teachers also code-switch and use society dominant language, Greek, in order to make meaning comprehensible for Russian heritage students.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S120 | Promoting Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs) in Higher Education through collaboration and innovation
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Stephane Charitos, Director Of The Language Resource Center, Columbia University
Angelika Kraemer, Cornell University
Christopher Kaiser, Columbia University
Shaheen Parveen, Main Presenter , Rutgers University
Catherine Baumann, Director, Chicago Language Center, University Of Chicago
Dianna Murphy, University Of Wisconsin-Madison
Emily Heidrich Uebel, Michigan State University
Koen Van Gorp, Michigan State University
Moderators
Emily Heidrich Uebel, Michigan State University
Felix Kronenberg, Associate Professor And Director Of The Center For Language Teaching Advancement, Michigan State University
Koen Van Gorp, Michigan State University
Both in the United States and Europe, language programs in higher education are losing students. This decline in enrollments has been especially noticeable in Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTL) programs. An individual institution or action cannot remedy the vulnerable position of LCTLs. Actions on multiple fronts are needed to counter the falling student numbers and to create a systemic improvement for all languages. This symposium focuses on two fronts: inter-institutional collaboration and pedagogic innovation. The first action focuses on how institutions, programs, and LCTL instructors can work together rather than compete for students. By collaborating and thinking across institutional boundaries, innovative solutions for offering a wide range of languages to all students can be explored. The second action focuses on how through innovating or reforming language programs and courses in LCTLs can become more attractive to students. Creating advanced proficiency-based courses, Language for Specific Purposes courses, project-based language learning, online and distance learning, and open educational resources could be a way to address needs of students that in "traditional" language programs might be overlooked. We invite papers that address one or both actions to secure and advance the future of LCTLs across institutions of higher education.
Collaboration in support of language education
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Stephane Charitos, Director Of The Language Resource Center, Columbia University
This presentation will investigate how collaboration can be a crucial lever to enact fundamental change in how individual institutions think of language provision. By working collaboratively across institutional boundaries, innovative solutions for offering a wide range of languages can be explored and exploited by like-minded partners.
The Shared Course Initiative: Sustaining and strengthening LCTLs across institutional boundaries
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Angelika Kraemer, Cornell University
Christopher Kaiser, Columbia University
This paper will present lessons learned and recommendations from the Shared Course Initiative, a distance collaboration at Columbia, Cornell, and Yale Universities in the United States that stabilizes and strengthens LCTL offerings and fosters pedagogical innovation in a 3-site community of practice.
Collaborative Innovations in Less Commonly Taught Languages: The Case of Hindi
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Shaheen Parveen, Main Presenter , Rutgers University
Mithilesh Mishra, Co-author, UIUC
Syed Ali, South Asian Language Program Director , University Of Michigan
Sarah Beckham, Cp-presenter, University Of Wisconsin, Madisaon
In this paper, we discuss major collaborative efforts in developing blended, online Hindi materials as part of the Mellon-funded MSU LCTL initiative.  We address challenges and best practices, a sustainable future for LCTL instruction and materials development in higher education, particularly post-Covid, and explore linkages and adaptability across institutions.
Fostering Innovation and Agency: Impactful Curricular Realignment through Reverse Design and Proficiency Assessment
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Catherine Baumann, Director, Chicago Language Center, University Of Chicago
This presentation will describe projects effecting curricular innovation across multiple languages and significant instructor agency in the transformation of assessments, curricula and materials. It will draw on multiple data sources including participating language instructors, and examples of their assessments and course materials before and after participating in the project.
Why university students do and don’t study languages. An inter-institutional study to inform responses to declining enrollments in LCTLs
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Dianna Murphy, University Of Wisconsin-Madison
Co-authors :
Koen Van Gorp, Michigan State University
Felix Kronenberg, Associate Professor And Director Of The Center For Language Teaching Advancement, Michigan State University
Institutional responses to declining enrollments in LCTLs should be informed by empirical research on students’ reasons for (not) studying languages. This session presents findings resulting from inter-institutional collaboration on a survey of undergraduates at two large U.S. universities on the reasons students do and don’t enroll in language courses.
Collaborating and innovating across institutions of higher education in the US: Lessons from the Less Commonly Taught Languages Partnership
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Emily Heidrich Uebel, Michigan State University
Luca Giupponi, Michigan State University
Co-authors :
Koen Van Gorp, Michigan State University
The Big Ten Less Commonly Taught and Indigenous Languages Partnership strives to create sustainable, shared models for language instruction across institutions. This presentation focuses on the ways this partnership promotes models of inter-institutional collaboration and pedagogical innovation by developing proficiency-based teaching materials in a range of modalities in several targeted languages.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S125 | Reading in Japanese as a Foreign Language: Bridging the literary and non-literary
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Vicky A. Richings, Kobe Shoin Women's University
Satoru Nakagawa, University Of Manitoba
Moderators
Vicky A. Richings, Kobe Shoin Women's University
In this symposium, we seek to explore the dynamic relations between literary and non-literary texts in Japanese as a Foreign Language (JFL) reading instruction. Specifically, the primary goal is to bridge the gap between fiction and non-fiction in the language classroom by exploring effective reading strategies and approaches that can contribute to Japanese language acquisition. Far from being restricted to their respective definitions as a genre, both fiction and non-fiction have proved to be valuable learning tools. Whether popular novels or manga, magazine or newspaper articles, a multitude of text genres are present in everyday life, thus demonstrating the potential to be an apposite vehicle for foreign language reading instruction. The general aim of this symposium proposal is to call for innovative ideas and practices that can offer alternative approaches to traditional reading instruction in JFL - with the specific purpose of enhancing not only learners' reading comprehension, but also their language skills in general. We especially encourage submissions introducing interdisciplinary approaches using fiction and non-fiction, bringing forth cutting edge research outcomes in the sphere of reading in a foreign language that expands beyond JFL to L2 reading in general.
Japanese as a Foreign Language Education (JFL) from the perspective of literature as a learning resource
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Vicky A. Richings, Kobe Shoin Women's University
In this featured multimodal presentation, I will introduce the results of a long-term study on the usage of literature in the Japanese language classroom in Japan. This study reflects on an alternative approach to JFL instruction by critically examining JFL education from the perspective of literature as a learning resource.
Teaching JFL in the Canadian Classroom: Oral language and written (literary) texts
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Satoru Nakagawa, University Of Manitoba
This presentation examines assumptions about literacy practices, specifically speaking to the appropriateness and difficulty of using literary and non-literary texts in the teaching of Japanese in a foreign language context. While teachers focus on communicative language teaching, university testing tests prioritizes written language skills.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S136 | ReN: Intersectional Perspectives on the Dynamics of Language, Communication and Culture: How Language Shapes Our Ideas about Race, Gender, and Sexuality in a Changing World
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Naomi Orton, PUC-Rio
Joana Plaza Pinto, Federal University Of Goiás
SILVIA MOLINA, Presenter, Polytechnic University Of Madrid
Dina Maria Martins Ferreira, Reseacher, Professor, Ceará State University
Aurora Tsai, University Of Tokyo
Colin Marisela, Profesor Titular , Universidad Nacional Autónoma De México
Damon Brewster, J. F. Oberlin University
Glenda Cristina Valim De Melo, Universidade Federal Do Estado Do Rio De Janeiro
Ayanna Brown, Elmhurst College
Thais Borges, Pontifical Catholic University Of Rio De Janeiro
Etyelle Pinheiro De Araujo, Pontifical Catholic University Of Rio De Janeiro
Moderators
Glenda Cristina Valim De Melo, Federal University Of Rio De Janeiro
Anne-Marie Van Boeckel (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
In Late Modernity we have the possibility to evidence and contest the silence or dehumanized discourses about BIPOC (Black and Indigenous People of Color), women, LGBTTQI and non-binary bodies. Within the last decade, there have been a critical mass of scholars in the growing field of raciolinguistics and gender and sexuality studies (Alim & Smitherman, 2013; Alim, Rickford, Ball, 2016; Ferreira, 2014; Flores; Rosa, 2015; Moita Lopes, 2012; Richardson, 2007) who are committed to revealing the central role that language plays in shaping our ideas about race, gender, and sexuality. We perceive an emergency in investigating these issues, especially in the social and historical west context, where hegemonic discourses about these social marks define performances and lives. Intersectional analyses of the interplay between race, gender, and sexuality are understood here as an invention that can help us to understand the social practices in the field of applied linguistics. In this symposium, we invite papers that discuss investigations that deal with language, race, gender, sexuality and its intersectionalities in a variety of contexts that help us bring together diverse theoretical frames and investigations that can contribute to the understanding of racial discourses intersected or not by other markers in Applied Linguistics.
Contemporary social movements and the discursive navigation of power dynamics: when the contestation of gendered norms begins at home
08:30AM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Naomi Orton, PUC-Rio
This qualitative interpretive investigation scrutinizes the discursive construction of horizontality within the context of contemporary social movements. Drawing on a corpus of recorded interactions between bicycle advocates in Rio de Janeiro, narrative and identity practices are analyzed in light of gendered frameworks and their possible contestation.
Metadiscursive battles at linguistic resources borders: race, class, and colonial metaphors
08:30AM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Joana Plaza Pinto, Federal University Of Goiás
This paper aims to discuss the multiplicity, dynamics and contingencies of textual forms that rationalize and justify the “language barrier” old colonial metaphor, in the context of contemporary migration in Brazil.
Race, gender and sexual diversity in corporate websites: a critical multimodal discourse analysis
08:30AM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
SILVIA MOLINA, Presenter, Polytechnic University Of Madrid
This paper addresses two main questions: How do companies use different modes to represent gender, race and sexual diversity issues? And how can all these modes be handled analytically? For that purpose, twenty corporate websites, selected on criteria of excellence, international scope and type of business, were examined following a multimodal critical discourse analysis perspective .
Transtphobia and transgender subject: a lexicon discursive analysis in the Brazilian funk bixa travesti
08:30AM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Dina Maria Martins Ferreira, Reseacher, Professor, Ceará State University
It is about the social praxis and the distinct aspects of the world of a transgender subject, considering performativity, identity and gender aspects. As an analytical corpus there is the Brazilian funk Bixa Travesti which offers itself linguistic-textual and discursive conditions about representations of oneself and the world.
Racial imposter syndrome and light-skinned privilege: Mixed heritage individuals’ struggle to negotiate identity and belonging
08:30AM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Aurora Tsai, University Of Tokyo
Co-authors :
Brenda Straka, Co-author, Duke University
Sarah Gaither, Co-author, Duke University
This study uncovers the types of raciolinguistic ideologies that mixed heritage individuals (MHIs) commonly encounter due to their racial appearance and linguistic practices. Thematic analysis of 293 MHIs primarily located in the U.S. indicate that MHIs often encounter exclusion because their racial appearance and linguistic practices do not fit listening subjects' beliefs that all people can be categorized using monoracial labels, must be native-like in their heritage languages/dialects, and that 'standard English' should be used in academic and professional settings.
Drawing on photographs in fashion magazines to study discrimination and racism from multimodal discourse analysis
08:30AM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Colin Marisela, Profesor Titular , Universidad Nacional Autónoma De México
This paper intervenes in the discussion about the relationship between discrimination and racism in México. Moita- Lopes and Baynham (2017: vi) say that the great navigations of the 15th and 16th century give birth to the beginning of globalization and that these discourses are based on the prefiguration of 'perfect and pure 'language, race (white), gender (male), sexuality (heterosexuality), religion (Christianity). These essentialist orders related to race was re-described by a cinematography event in 2018. A set of photographs of one of the actresses circulated in well-known magazines and provoked racist reactions and comments. 
Covert racial stereotyping in the language of football: A Critical Discourse Analysis of online reporting
08:30AM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Damon Brewster, J. F. Oberlin University
Damian Fitzpatrick, University Of The Arts, London
This study aims to ascertain to what extent racial stereotyping of footballers in the English game exists in mainstream online media reports. Using a Critical Discourse Analysis approach, the researchers explore a corpus of UK online football reports, comparing results with research by McCarthy and Jones over 20 years ago.
Race and Gender Performativity in the Advertising Campaign SUS sem Racismo
08:30AM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Glenda Cristina Valim De Melo, Universidade Federal Do Estado Do Rio De Janeiro
This paper intends to to analyze race and gender performativity in the advertising campaign on racism and to investigate the performative effects of this campaign on comments posted on the “SUS without Racism” Facebook page. To this end, it intertwines perspectives of Indisciplinary Applied Linguistics, critical sociolinguistics, and decolonial epistemologies
Toward racially literate thinking: Investigating process within languaging race for white teacher candidates in the United States.
08:30AM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ayanna Brown, Elmhurst College
How might discussions of race in a teacher education course build languaging race as a means to develop racially literate thinking practices? This qualitative research study examines a seven-year period of data collection where teacher candidates’ video journals are analyzed coding language development within and across teacher candidates.
Intersectionality, whiteness and critical feeling: reflecting upon performative affective practices of critical white scholars in the academic context under a decolonial gaze
08:30AM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Thais Borges, Pontifical Catholic University Of Rio De Janeiro
From an intersectional and decolonial perspective, I reflect upon the performativity of whiteness and affect in the academic context by looking into the discursive evaluative stances (Nóbrega, 2009) in research as performance (De Fina, 2015) and race performativity (Melo, 2019, 2020). I defend we white scholars must center race matters and work on emotions as performative impressions (Ahmed, 2004) to foster "critical feeling" (Borges, 2017) in academia as a western/colonial/racist heteronormative/neoliberal/christian institution which compels us to remain active in the constant struggle for social justice and against power regimes of whiteness, if we are to render our work critical.
Narrating police violence and death: black Brazilian mothers and their struggle for justice
08:30AM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Etyelle Pinheiro De Araujo, Pontifical Catholic University Of Rio De Janeiro
By analyzing narratives told in demonstrations, this study aims to understand how mothers who have lost their children in police violence organize their suffering by narrating such death. This study aligns itself with interpretative qualitative research methodology. The analysis was guided by Narrative Analysis and Anthropology of Emotions.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S150 2/3 | ReN: on Early Language Learning
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Mila Schwartz, Head Of The Research Authority , Oranim Academic College Of Education
Renata Šamo, Vice-Dean For Research And International Cooperation; Head Of The English Department, Juraj Dobrila University Of Pula, Faculty Of Humanities
Jana Roos, University Of Potsdam
Kaisa Hahl, University Of Helsinki
Nils Jaekel, University Of Oulu
Laura De Ruiter, Tufts University | PACE Research Institute
Marie-Pierre Jouannaud, University Of Grenoble
Anne-Marie Morgan, University Of New England
John Hajek, University Of Melbourne
Claudia Seele, Project Manager, RAA Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
Gabrijela Aleksic, University Of Luxembourg
Claudine Kirsch, Researcher, Lecturer, University Of Luxembourg
Tanja Samulin, University Of Helsinki
Moderators
Heather Hilton, Convenor, Symposium 150 On Early Language Learning (AILA REN), Lumière University Lyon 2
Eva Wilden, University Of Duisburg-Essen
Andre Korporaal (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer
The Early Language Learning Research Network has organized a Symposium at the past two AILA Congresses (Brisbane in 2014, Rio de Janiero in 2017), a sign of increasing scientific and political interest in language learning in the primary and preschool years. In such a context, a forum for the scientific consideration of the specificities of early language learning (ELL) is vital for teachers, materials designers and policy makers worldwide, and the objective of our AILA Symposia has always been to bring together speakers who can synthesize important work being carried out at regional and national levels, in order to inform policy and practice. The current ELL ReN has identified eight particularly important research strands, which provide the structure for our Symposium proposal: classroom practices for ELL, training teachers for ELL, ELL by multilingual and migrant learners, digital media for ELL, assessment in ELL, learning to read and write in ELL, "early years" instructed language learning (under the age of 6). The ReN strand coordinators have proposed featured speakers who will be presenting high-level studies on these themes, and the ELL Network invites similarly high-level papers to complete these perspectives.
Language-conducive strategies and young language learners
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Mila Schwartz, Head Of The Research Authority , Oranim Academic College Of Education
I address a novel theoretical concept of language-conducive strategies. These strategies are aimed to enhance children's willingness to communicate" in L2. I present such strategies as creating a low-anxiety atmosphere, teacher and peer modeling, explicit request to use L2, elicitation strategies, teacher mediated socio-dramatic play, and creating a language area."
EFL reading strategies in the Croatian teaching context
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Renata Šamo, Vice-Dean For Research And International Cooperation; Head Of The English Department, Juraj Dobrila University Of Pula, Faculty Of Humanities
Marija Smuda Duric, Consultant, Internationale Forschungsstelle Für Mehrsprachigkeit, LMU
The current study is focused on reading strategies as presented in various EFL textbooks for learners in lower primary school grades (1-4) with special reference to their use by Croatian teachers and importance for enhancing good reading performance in the target graders.
Metalinguistic discovery through working with linguistic landscapes
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Jana Roos, University Of Potsdam
Howard Nicholas, Adjunct Professor, La Trobe University
We report on how young German EFL students engage with their local English landscapes. They photographed, commented on and compared examples of English and reflected on the usefulness of their experiences for language learning. Their comments reveal that they developed awareness of the potential of linguistic environments for EFL learning.
Class teachers, subject teachers and double qualified: Conceptions of teachers’ skills in early foreign language teaching in Finland
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Kaisa Hahl, University Of Helsinki
Co-authors :
Maija Pietarila, University Of Helsinki
This presentation examines teachers' conceptions of the skills and competencies, including required language skills, that are important for a teacher in early foreign language teaching. The participants of this study were 44 teachers who were either subject teachers (specialized in the foreign language), class teachers (generalists without studies in the foreign language or language education), or teachers with a dual qualification as class teacher and subject teacher. The data were gathered through essays that the teachers turned in as tasks during an in-service teacher training for early teaching of foreign languages. The essays were analyzed with content analysis. 
Bridging the gap: How self-concepts impact students’ perceptions of the transition from elementary to secondary education and their language proficiency
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Nils Jaekel, University Of Oulu
The transition from elementary to secondary school has been identified as a crucial juncture for early foreign language learning’s (EFLL) long-term success. This cross-sectional, quantitative study investigates students’ perception of the transition, how their self-concepts impact their perception and explains its relationship with reading and listening comprehension.
ACCE - a culturally appropriate vocabulary assessment for young Chinese learners of English
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Laura De Ruiter, Tufts University | PACE Research Institute
Co-authors :
Peizhi Wen, PACE Research Institute
We have developed a culturally appropriate vocabulary test specifically for young Chinese learners of English. We will discuss the development process and present the full set of results from two field tests with several hundred participants, including an analysis of the relationship proficiency level and distractor choice (phonological, semantic, unrelated).
Piloting a serious game to teach aural vocabulary in context to young L2 learners
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Marie-Pierre Jouannaud, University Of Grenoble
Co-authors :
Mathieu Loiseau, INSA, Lyon
We present the results of an experiment in which 6-year-old English learners played a serious game targeting 40 words and combining systematic activities promoting form-meaning pairings with contextualization through the use of a storyline. The experimental groups outperformed the control groups by a significant margin in a delayed posttest.
Starting Young: Early Years Language Learning in Australia
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Anne-Marie Morgan, University Of New England
John Hajek, University Of Melbourne
Co-authors :
Elizabeth Ellis, Adjunct Associate Professor (Applied Linguistics), University Of New England
We present early findings from an Australian Research Council Discovery project investigating successful languages programs in preschools and early primary years. The project explores national and international policies and practices, teacher education, and examples of successful programs, across Australia, in 'world', community and Aboriginal languages, referenced against world trends.
From language policy to educational practices: early multilingual education in Luxembourg
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Claudia Seele, Project Manager, RAA Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
Co-authors :
Claudine Kirsch, Researcher, Lecturer, University Of Luxembourg
This presentation outlines recent changes in language education policy in Luxembourg which call for a more inclusive and multilingual early language education in the formal and non-formal sector and examines the influence of professional development aimed to help early years practitioners appropriate the new policies and put them into practice.
Developing multiliteracies in early years education in Luxembourg
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Claudine Kirsch, Researcher, Lecturer, University Of Luxembourg
Gabrijela Aleksic, University Of Luxembourg
Preliteracy skills are strong predictors of literacy skills and, therefore, educators should engage children in literacy activities from an early age. Drawing on interviews and questionnaires, this paper presents the educators’ attitudes, their engagement in (multi)literacy activities and the type and frequency of such activities in day-care centres in Luxembourg.
Teachers’ conceptions and practices in teaching oral language skills in early teaching of foreign languages
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Tanja Samulin, University Of Helsinki
Co-authors :
Kaisa Hahl, University Of Helsinki
Early teaching of foreign languages (ETFL) in Finland is a new and topical issue. Music has been shown to be beneficial in language learning. In this paper, we focus on how songs are used in the foreign language classroom with learners in the first and second years of school in the Finnish context. 
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S151 2/2 | ReN: Whose taste matters? Authority, meaning, and culture in the linguistics of food
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Stefan Diemer, Trier University Of Applied Sciences
Jonathon Coltz, Saarland University
Polly Szatrowski, Professor Of Linguistics, University Of Minnesota
Cynthia Gordon, Georgetown University
Gwynne Mapes, University Of Bern
Alla Tovares, Howard University
Kelsi Matwick, University Of Florida
Weiwei Guo, Lumière University Lyon 2
Moderators
Cornelia Gerhardt, Saarland University
Sally Wiggins, Associate Professor, Linköping University
Mariam Jamureli , AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
This symposium addresses global and cultural challenges within the linguistics of food, focusing on how taste (and other senses) is not simply a property of individuals or of foods, but rather becomes a contested and negotiated concept through lexical and embodied linguistic practices. In short, 'taste' is a fluid concept and has implications not only for the field of linguistics, but also across the sensory and social sciences. The symposium will bring together researchers working in four key areas within the linguistics of food: interactional food assessments, the semantics of taste, consuming identities and global food media. For instance, how might one individual's assessment of food be shared or treated as having greater authority or expertise over another? How are the sensory semantics of taste produced in different contexts: how do linguistic practices overlap with sensory practices? How do producers and consumers negotiate taste as an individual or shared, food-based or culturally-based concept? How do linguistic practices in various forms of digital and print food media become sites in which taste is contested in a globally shifting world? The symposium aims to engage researchers from broad cultural and international backgrounds while focusing on central concepts within the linguistics of food.Please note that we will continue to use an external Zoom room for the afternoon session: Meeting ID: 668 9740 6244 Passcode 401539S151 detailed programme, click here
The interactive assessment of food as embodied performance
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Stefan Diemer, Trier University Of Applied Sciences
The paper analyzes how food items are evaluated through both verbal and nonverbal means in an interactive meal setting. Multimodal resources are employed alongside verbal descriptions, including gestures, body movements, facial expressions, and gustatory noises. Evaluations take place both multimodally and interactively, with participants using all modes at their disposal.
Embodied, interactive evaluation in focus groups on food
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Jonathon Coltz, Saarland University
I use a microanalytic approach to show that participant evaluations in focus groups on food are negotiated as part of an embodied, interactive process that employs multiple semiotic modalities. A cooperative semiosis is therefore at work in these evaluations, which unfold in time via verbal and gestural interaction.
Everyone’s Taste Matters!: Negotiating Japanese Food Assessments with Language and the Body
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Polly Szatrowski, Professor Of Linguistics, University Of Minnesota
This paper investigates how Japanese participants negotiate food assessments with their language and bodies at a Dairy Taster Brunch. The analysis focuses on 1) What triggers talk about whipped cream? 2) How do participants create, monitor, and accept/resist stances toward whipped cream, and 3) How do results shed light on the question of "Whose taste matters?".
Ratatouille with “East Indian flavors”: Constructing fusion food as “authentic” on a documentary-style reality TV cooking show
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Cynthia Gordon, Georgetown University
Analyzing three fusion food-centric episodes of an American documentary-style reality TV cooking show, I demonstrate how linguistic and multimodal strategies—ingredient descriptions (especially regarding taste), non-English word pronunciations, references to family members, place-centric narratives, negation, nonverbal actions, and on-screen captions—are used to construct fusion food as “authentic.”
Brooklyn foodie “insiders”: (Dis)avowing distinction over dinner
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Gwynne Mapes, University Of Bern
This presentation focuses on the discursive production of class status and, specifically, the management of distinction/privilege during conversations about, and around, food.
“Imitations of Italian Parmigiano taste like sawdust to me”: Authenticity, distinction, and (dis)alignment in online newspaper comments
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Alla Tovares, Howard University
Through the analysis of online newspaper comments posted in reaction to an article discussing “real” vs. “fake” Parmesan, this study contributes to our understanding of how class-linked distinction, masked as “good taste,” is (re)constructed in online commentary about cheese and how alignment is achieved through negative evaluative stances.
The construction of friendly authenticity on menus in Stellenbosch, South Africa
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Kelsi Matwick, University Of Florida
Menus are important platforms for self-presentation of restaurants. This study investigates how restaurants present their 'personality' on menus, specifically menus on walls, signs, and print. A case study of Stellenbosch, South Africa, is used, as the city has a high cluster of independently owned restaurants and is the heart of the winelands and known for its cuisine. Using Goffman's (1959) presentation of self and Ben-Rafael's (2008) sociological approach to linguistic landscape, this study examines how menus are designed and what identities are constructed. These findings reveal how humor helps create a friendly authenticity on menus, which fosters community.
Sweet and bitter: a contrastive study of tea tasting notes in Chinese and French
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Weiwei Guo, Lumière University Lyon 2
A corpus based contrastive study of tea tasting notes in Chinese and French highlighted a strong cultural imprint regarding both the organoleptic perception and its description.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S161 2/3 | Study abroad as a multilingual, intercultural and transnational experience
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Celeste Kinginger, Penn State University
Clare Wright, University Of Leeds
Meagan Driver, Michigan State University
Yi Wang, Stony Brook University
Michele Back, University Of Connecticut
Yi Wang, Stony Brook University
Rodrigo Rodriguez-Fuentes, Universidad Del Norte
Roswita Dressler, Associate Professor, University Of Calgary
Ozge Guney, University Of South Florida
Khaled Al Masaeed, Carnegie Mellon University
Moderators
Rosamond Mitchell, University Of Southampton
Kata Csizér, Eotvos Lorand University
Ana Beaven, University Of Bologna
June Eyckmans, Presenter, Ghent University
Nicole Tracy-Ventura, West Virginia University
Mark Van Huizen, AILA2021 Volunteer
Study abroad is a complex educational experience, with potential to support academic, linguistic, personal and intercultural development. Traditionally, applied linguistics research has concentrated on SA as an opportunity for second language acquisition by instructed learners, with a focus on single languages (English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese etc). However in practice study abroad today takes place in multilingual and multicultural environments, and involves students from increasingly diverse transnational backgrounds. Much less is known about the likely impact of such complex experiences on student development (e.g. whether they experience multilingualism and/ or interculturality as a series of separate linguistic and cultural encounters, or as an integrated whole). This symposium therefore invites contributions from researchers interested in the impact of contemporary study abroad experiences on: students' evolving multilingualism including development in individual languages plus interactions between home languages, local languages, English as a lingua franca students' beliefs, language attitudes and multilingual identity students' intercultural and transnational orientation students' personal development in terms of agency, self-regulation and autonomy. As well as reporting their empirical research, contributors will be asked to reflect on their theoretical contribution to the understanding of SA, and/or to the educational support frameworks which can maximise students' development in contemporary SA settings.S161 detailed programme, click here
Where are they now? A comprehensive study of career pathways for U.S.-based language study abroad alumni
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Celeste Kinginger, Penn State University
This presentation focuses on selected findings from a comprehensive, mixed-methods study examining the careers of language study abroad alumni. The study includes a nationwide survey, with complete data from 4,868 respondents, and life history interviews with approximately 60 participants selected on the basis of a typology developed through the survey.
The student Expectation Journey from SA back home
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Clare Wright, University Of Leeds
Co-authors :
Ying Peng, Co-author, University Of Leeds
This talk discusses SA experiences of studying in China during and post-SA.
The development of the multilingual self during study abroad
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Meagan Driver, Michigan State University
The present study explores the impact of a short-term study abroad experience in a multilingual region on students’ general interest in multilingualism and the development of a multilingual self. Qualitative data reveal that students maintain only an elementary understanding of multilingualism but show increased post-program interests in third language acquisition.
'My whiteness is very prominent in Cusco:' Cultural excavation among teacher candidates studying abroad in Peru
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Michele Back, University Of Connecticut
I report on how teacher candidates used cultural excavation activities to reflect upon a study abroad experience in Peru and the role of these activities in developing intercultural competence. Findings show movement towards more ethnorelative stances, demonstrating cultural excavation as a powerful, albeit not sufficient, framework for scaffolding study abroad.
Multiracial Chinese American Women Studying Abroad in China: Negotiating Race and Gender in Mandarin
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Yi Wang, Stony Brook University
Co-authors :
Wenhao Diao, Presenter
The study investigates the intersectionality of race, gender, and language learning by focusing on three multiracial women in China. Interviews and recorded conversations show complex strategies to negotiate identity. By asserting their Chinese-ness but rejecting the Chinese discourse about gender, they engaged in the construction of a hybrid identity.
Linguistic and Cultural Factors in Graduate School Admissions: An Examination of Latin American Students in the U.S.A.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Rodrigo Rodriguez-Fuentes, Universidad Del Norte
This study establishes a baseline for understanding the linguistic and cultural complexities of the Latin American population in graduate school in the United States. Quantitative and qualitative data were gathered to explore academic experiences, cultural influences and socioeconomic patterns that influenced the requirements for admission in graduate school.
Personal and Professional Learning through Reflection on a Pre-service Teacher Study Abroad Sojourn: A Longitudinal Study of Teachers
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Roswita Dressler, Associate Professor, University Of Calgary
Through study abroad pre-service teachers can learn a new language, experience another culture, and develop teaching practices. We studied the long-term influence these pre-service sojourns have on sojourners once they are practicing teachers by interviewing 10 alumni who then reflected on their personal and professional learning from their short-term sojourns.
Residence abroad as social investment: Challenges and gains revealed through a longitudinal study
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ozge Guney, University Of South Florida
Co-authors :
Nicole Tracy-Ventura, West Virginia University
This presentation focuses on the results of a case-study examining the long-term impact of a seemingly challenging study abroad experience and how the participant’s personal development during that time inspired her to live abroad again. A longitudinal perspective is needed in SA research to examine such long-term effects.
Multidialectal and Multilingual Practices in L2 Arabic Study Abroad Contexts
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Khaled Al Masaeed, Carnegie Mellon University
This study examines interlocutors’ orientations to, and use of, multidialectal and multilingual practices during L2 Arabic conversations-for-learning beyond the classroom in a study abroad program. Recorded interactions show such practices can work as a valuable interactional resource that multilinguals draw upon to enhance meaning-making, identity negotiation, and knowledge construction.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S188 2/2 | Understanding the dynamics of language teachers’ professional development
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Kyoko Kasuya, Tokyo Gakugei University
Vasiliki Celia Antoniou, Lecturer / Senior Teaching Fellow, University College London / University Of The West Of Scotland
Natheeporn Keawkhong, Thammasat University
Lorena Salud Gadella Kamstra, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University Of Essex
Jenelle Reeves, University Of Nebraska-Lincoln
Beatrice Dupuy, Professor Of French / Public And Applied Humanities, University Of Arizona
Kristen Michelson, Co-Author, Presenter, Texas Tech University
Emma Riordan, University Language Teacher, University College Cork
Imelda Bangun, University Of South Florida
Andrea Lypka
Christoph Merkelbach
Moderators
Inge Elferink, University Of Groningen
Siebrich De Vries, University Of Groningen
Seyit Omer Gok, AILA2021 Volunteer
Because most language learning takes place in educational contexts, from an ecological perspective, it is important to understand the dynamics of language teachers' professional development. This understanding is necessary for two reasons: (1) to exchange new research insights and practical experience in a sustainable manner and (2) to generate new insights regarding the dynamic processes of the professional development of individual teachers. Within complex systems thinking, these dynamic processes are an intrinsic part of social behavior and will vary for different people and even for the same person in different contexts (Opfer & Pedder, 2011). Pedagogical content knowledge research focuses on this dual purpose via, for example, teacher professional development programs centering around language teaching pedagogy. A challenge within this field of research, however, is taking the dynamic processes and the teaching contexts of individual teachers into consideration. This symposium brings together recent research that has faced this challenge thereby aiming to obtain a deeper understanding of the dynamics of language teachers' professional development. Please click herefor the detailed program.
Higher Education Language Educator Competences (HELECs): A national project for the continuing professional development of language educators in HE
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Emma Riordan, University Language Teacher, University College Cork
This paper outlines a nationally funded research project which examines the competences needed by language educators in Higher Education contexts. We provide background on the currently available frameworks and demonstrate how a context-specific profile of competences is crucial for languages in the HE sector.
The Newly Introduced National Core Curriculum for Pre-Service English Teacher Education in Japan: Developing Comprehensive Model Programs
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Kyoko Kasuya, Tokyo Gakugei University
Co-authors :
Tetsuo Baba, Tokyo Gakugei University
Ryuichi Yorozuya, Hokkaido University Of Education
Osamu Takeuchi, Kansai University
Wataru Suzuki, Miyagi University Of Education
Shunsuke Uchino, Associated Professor, Hokkaido University Of Education
Yoshiki Takayama, Tokyo Gakugei University
Motoko Abe, Tokyo Gakugei University
Misato Usukura, Tokyo Gakugei University
Tatsuya Nakano, Komazawa Women's College
Hideki Sakai, Shinshu University
The National Core Curriculum for Pre-service English Teacher Education was recently introduced in Japan. Implementing it effectively demands concrete teaching models, syllabuses, and teaching methodology. The goals of our research are to gather comprehensive information regarding best practices and propose long-awaited model programs.
A pathway to enhancing online conceptual development for trainee teachers in an L2 academic context
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Vasiliki Celia Antoniou, Lecturer / Senior Teaching Fellow, University College London / University Of The West Of Scotland
This paper will report the experiences of 36 trainee teacher students at a UK based University engaging with a variety of activities during an intensive telecollaboration English for Academic purposes (EAP) training course on Moodle.
Factors Influencing Teaching Profession: Listening to Teachers’ Voices
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Natheeporn Keawkhong, Thammasat University
This research study reveals foreign language (FL) teachers’ voices on factors affecting their teaching profession. Under the conceptual framework of Rosenholtz’s (1991) theory of teacher workplace commitment, the researchers found that the teachers themselves, the nature of students, teacher evaluation, university facilities, and the organization’s goals influence teachers’ teaching profession.
Enriching EFL Teachers’ Professional Experiences and Motivation: An Ecological Perspective
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Lorena Salud Gadella Kamstra, AILA Solidarity Awardee, University Of Essex
By using Bronfenbrenner’s Ecosystems theory (1979, 1993), this study offers an ecological understanding of the improvements needed in the EFL teaching profession, in which the importance of the contexts is reinforced. Possible solutions to EFL teachers’ negative professional experiences and demotivation will be examined.
Teacher, Immigrant, Teacher: A Yazidi-American English Teacher’s Identity Journey from Iraq to the United States
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Jenelle Reeves, University Of Nebraska-Lincoln
Daran, a Yazidi English teacher, makes investments in his teacher identity as his teaching context changes from Iraq to the United States. This study pushes teacher development research forward by examining how Daran negotiates his identity investments and how those investments endure contextual constraints.
Under construction: A longitudinal investigation of novice collegiate foreign language teachers’ professional identity development in learning multiliteracies pedagogies
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Beatrice Dupuy, Professor Of French / Public And Applied Humanities, University Of Arizona
Kristen Michelson, Co-Author, Presenter, Texas Tech University
This study investigated the relationships between evolving professional identities and learning-in-practice experiences of novice French language teaching assistants learning multiliteracies pedagogies over two years. Findings reveal complex relationships between professional identities and degrees of appropriation of new pedagogical content knowledge and instructional practices.
Uncovering Transnational Practitioner-Researchers’ Identity and Equity-oriented Practices: A Critical Lens
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Andrea Lypka
Imelda Bangun, University Of South Florida
In this duoethnography, two educators and doctoral students with dissimilar linguistic and cultural backgrounds interrogate their transnational teacher-researcher trajectories. Through this equitable partnership we juxtapose our experiences to transcend the research-practice divide, unpack the importance of a community of practice, and promote social justice in research and teaching spaces.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S191 2/2 | Visualising multilingualism as lived
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Heidi Niemelä, University Teacher / PhD Researcher, University Of Oulu
Ana Carolina Laurentiis Brandao, State University Of Mato Grosso - UNEMAT
Paula Kalaja, University Of Jyväskylä, Finland
Mireia Perez-Peitx, Faculty Of Education
Maria Ruohotie-Lyhty, University Of Jyväskylä
Sílvia Melo-Pfeifer, University Of Hamburg
Moderators
Paula Kalaja, University Of Jyväskylä, Finland
Sílvia Melo-Pfeifer, University Of Hamburg
Joanna Porkert , AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
This symposium focuses on multilingualism as lived or as subjectively experienced- and accessed by visual means. More specifically, it addresses aspects of becoming or being multilingual subjects in different contexts, be they learners, teachers or users of more than one language: what sense do they themselves make of aspects of their lives or worlds where they find themselves in, including identities, emotions and future aspirations. These issues are studied by collecting visual data, e.g., by asking participants in studies to produce drawings (or self-portraits) or to take photos. The pools of visual data of various kinds may be complemented by other types data and are analysed for their form and/or content. The symposium is a response to the recently launched turn in applied language studies (i.e., the multilingual turn) and to the criticism against "lingualism" in addressing multilingualism as lived- and is different in its focus from an objective approach to multilingualism and from describing linguistic landscapes or schoolscapes. Invited speakers include Professors Brigitta Busch, University of Vienna, Austria, and Sílvia Melo-Pfeifer, University of Hamburg, Germany.Click here to find the detailed program
Language ideologies in primary school pupils’ and teacher trainees’ drawings on ‘Finnish language’ – Multilingualism’s influence on visual representations.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Heidi Niemelä, University Teacher / PhD Researcher, University Of Oulu
The paper explores drawings on ‘Finnish language’ by primary school pupils and teacher trainees. It concentrates especially on the represented connection of language, nationality and nation as well as on the differences that the multilingualism of the participants creates in the drawings.
The shaping of a second language teacher identity in drawings
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ana Carolina Laurentiis Brandao, State University Of Mato Grosso - UNEMAT
This paper makes use of drawings to examine how Brazilian student teachers imagine EFL teaching before implementing language materials for the first time. By adopting a narrative perspective on teacher identity, it explores how the interplay between their past as pupils and present as student teachers shape their professional aspirations.
Multilingualism in the L2 classes as envisioned by student teachers
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Paula Kalaja, University Of Jyväskylä, Finland
Co-authors :
Katja Mäntylä, University Of Jyväskylä, Finland
Considering recent developments in multilingualism, this paper reports on a study with L2 student teachers and focuses on their awareness of these developments. They were asked to envision an ideal L2 class of theirs (to be given in the future) visually and verbally. The data were subjected to content analysis.
Visualising interaction in multilingual situations: what do pre service teachers think?
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Mireia Perez-Peitx, Faculty Of Education
Co-authors :
Juli Palou, Faculty Of Education
Isabel Civera Lopez, Faculty Of Education
This communication reports a study examining pre service teachers' beliefs (N=75) regarding interaction in multilingual classrooms. Trainees produced two visual narratives plus a written explanatory text. Early results show a perception of multilingualism often based on stereotypes, as well as a limited vision regarding the communicative approach to language teaching.
Student teachers in Brazil and in Finland envisioning themselves as multilingual professionals
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Maria Ruohotie-Lyhty, University Of Jyväskylä
Co-authors :
Anne Pitkänen-Huhta, University Of Jyväskylä
This study focuses on emotions and beliefs Finnish and Brazilian student teachers attach to their future professional identities. The two contexts make visible the ways in which multilingual experiences are situated and embodied. Particularly, the participants envisioned the multilingual professional experience subjectively in terms of belonging, cooperation, isolation and frustration.
Visual methods in teacher education: uncovering student-teachers’ representations of foreign language teaching and learning
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Sílvia Melo-Pfeifer, University Of Hamburg
This contribution reports on the multimodal analysis of 20 (professional) portraits of foreign language learners and teachers produced by French student-teachers at the University of Hamburg, based on the instructions "How did you become a (potential) French teacher?". I discuss methodological challenges and lessons learnt.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S200 | Introducing AIALA: AILA’s Ibero-American Association of Applied Linguistics
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Nukácia Meyre Araújo, Profa. Associada, Universidade Estadual Do Ceará
Francisco José Cortés Rodríguez, AESLA
Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala, Professor, Colorado State University
Karina Fascinetto Zago, Associate Professor, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma De Puebla (BUAP)
Laura Gurzynski-Weiss, Indiana University
Kyria Finardi, Professor- Researcher, Federal University Of Espirito Santo - UFES
Moderators
Kyria Finardi, Professor- Researcher, Federal University Of Espirito Santo - UFES
Laura Gurzynski-Weiss, Indiana University
Mohamed Salama, PhD Student (Moderator), University Of Groningen
The Ibero-American Association of Applied Linguists (AIALA, by its abbreviations in both Spanish and Portuguese) was created in August of 2020 to better reflect the rich linguistic diversity in the world within the global organization of AILA. In creating AIALA, we have reconceptualized the "regional" membership of AILA beyond physical residence/geographical location, focusing instead on the Spanish, Portuguese, and affiliated minority language(s) spoken and researched by applied linguists. AIALA is a collaboration between AMLA (Mexico), ALAB (Brazil), AESLA (Spain), and AAAL (North America), with additional opportunity for membership by AILA members-at-large where there are no national affiliates (yet), including but not limited to Portugal, Chile, Colombia, and Argentina. In our symposium, we begin by presenting AIALA's overarching goals and plans for short- and long-term collaboration within and beyond academia. We highlight the unique capacity for AIALA to unite research scholars around the world and provide a multilingual lens through which we can conduct research via more inclusive and just engagement and resulting impact. Following our discussion of AIALA as a whole, a representative from each founding national organization (AMLA, ALAB, AESLA, and AAAL) will share their organization's connection to the goals of AIALA demonstrating how, in collaborating via multinational membership, we are much greater than the sum of our parts. We conclude the symposium with specific opportunities to join us in supporting and amplifying Spanish, Portuguese, and affiliated minority languages, both in terms of applied linguistics research foci and in terms of supporting applied linguists who speak these languages worldwide.
S200 | introduction by organizers
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Laura Gurzynski-Weiss, Indiana University
Kyria Finardi, Professor- Researcher, Federal University Of Espirito Santo - UFES
Brazilian Applied Linguistics: 50 years of tradition
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Nukácia Meyre Araújo, Profa. Associada, Universidade Estadual Do Ceará
Brazilian Applied Linguistics has a 50-year tradition focusing on the articulation of language with various fields of knowledge. This presentation aims to put forward a general overview of research in Applied Linguistics in Brazil, focusing on contemporary social life and the interdisciplinary perspective discussed by Moita Lopes (2006/2016).
AESLA (Asociación Española de Lingüística Aplicada): Overview and Future Prospects
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Francisco José Cortés Rodríguez, AESLA
This presentation will offer an overview of the Spanish Society for Applied Linguistics (AESLA) activities and scientific areas of AESLA with a focus on the possible connections with the goals of AIALA, as can be the creation of collaborative research networks with scholars from the other member associations.
What’s happening at the American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL)?
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Fabiola Ehlers-Zavala, Professor, Colorado State University
The American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL), an AILA member, was launched in 1977 as a "professional organization of scholars who are interested in and actively contribute to the multi-disciplinary field of applied linguistics." The presenter will offer an update on the current state of the organization. Finally, the presenter will provide an update on its support to the Ibero-American Association of Applied Linguistics (AIALA) as a founding member to maximize access and involvement of applied linguists in the work of AILA as well.
Asociación Mexicana de Lingüística Aplicada (AMLA): development and relevance of some research projects
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Karina Fascinetto Zago, Associate Professor, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma De Puebla (BUAP)
This presentation aims to put forward a general overview of research in Applied Linguistics in Mexico. The purpose is to present the development and relevance of some research projects in Mexico, focusing on multiculturalism and multilingualism, and the importance of these studies in the various areas of socio-cultural development.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S202 | Multimodality: Evaluation and Application
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Jo Taylor, RMIT University
Adrian Yip, Queen Mary University Of London
Konatsu Tokugi, Tamagawa University | NDS Co.,Ltd.
Stephanie Schwartz, Millersville University
Richard Burns, West Chester University Of Pennsylvania
Karim Sadeghi, AILA Solidarity Awardee, Urmia University
Marijke Schipper
Suha Alansari, King Abdulaziz University
Moderators
Audrey Rousse-Malpat, Chair Of Social Program, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Marjolijn Verspoor, Chair AILA Organizing Committee And Mentor, University Of Groningen
Nelleke Jansen (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
Polarisation of opinions on religious belief in YouTube comments threads on American ex-Christian deconversion narrative videos.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Jo Taylor, RMIT University
Disagreement and hostile discourse are common on social media, especially when the topic under discussion is contentious or polarising. Social media activity can reinforce existing opinions, or lead individuals to radically change their views, including on religious belief. This presentation explores the problem of antagonism between ideologically opposed groups in comment threads on YouTube. The analysis focussing on multimodal aspects of negative evaluative discourse.
Gender representations of tennis players in the new media: A corpus-assisted critical discourse analytic study
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Adrian Yip, Queen Mary University Of London
This presentation draws examples from a sports context to illustrate the importance of multimodality in social media research.
A Critical Analysis of Language Teaching with Multimodal and Multiliteracies
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Konatsu Tokugi, Tamagawa University | NDS Co.,Ltd.
The verbal materials consider as mainstream of communication for a long time. However, non-verbal communication starts to speak eloquently in our life. This study examines the potential of multimodal teaching methods and materials in classroom. That provides us a clue to make more useful strategy for language leaning.
Towards Understanding the Role of Information Graphics in Multimodal Documents
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Stephanie Schwartz, Millersville University
Richard Burns, West Chester University Of Pennsylvania
This talk presents the results of studies that assess the ability of viewers to consistently recognize the intended message of information graphics. We then present the communicative signals that enable us to infer this intended message and explore how knowledge of these communicative signals can allow us to develop automated systems to support visually or cognitively impaired individuals and also design better information graphics.
06:30PM - 07:30PM
Cooking together in Gather.Town Activity Center | Kitchens
Do you have a (traditional) dish or drink which you would like to prepare live for and with other AILA delegates? During lunch and dinner times we have arranged some time slots, when others can join you in the virtual kitchen. We hope to have dishes/drinks from different parts of our AILA world! Doyou want to host such a cooking session? Please sign up here and let us know what dish you wish to make.Go to Gathertown!
07:00PM - 08:00PM
PubQuiz @ Gather.Town
Save the date on Monday evening at 7.00 PM (CET), 16 August for the PubQuiz when we close the first AILA day in the most informal but competitive way (Audrey and Marije are the hostesses!). Ready for one hour full of sharing fun and linguistic-related (and not only) knowledge?Go to Gathertown!
Tuesday, August 17, 2021
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S008 1/3 | AILA-Europe Junior Research Meeting in Applied Linguistics
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Daniela Modrescu, Trinity College Dublin
Rosana Villares, University Of Zaragoza
Jaqueline Mora, PhD Student , University Of La Rioja
Mariangel Carreño, Teacher Education Council, Uruguay
Madeleine Strobel, University Of Glasgow
Anssi Roiha, University Of Turku
Eirini Kelmali, CITY College, University Of York European Campus
Eva Malessa, Junior Researcher, University Of Jyväskylä
Aleksandra Gnach, ZHAW Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Leila Imppola, University Of Jyväskylä
Laurene Glimois, Assistant Professor Of French (starting Jan. 2022), Georgia Institute Of Technology
Nuhi Bllaca, University Of Vienna
Sabina Zorčič, Researcher, Institute For Ethnic Studies
Sarah Olthoff, University Of Oldenburg
Sarah Muller, Research Associate, University Of Sheffield
Tanja Seppälä, Doctoral Researcher (PhD Student), University Of Jyväskylä
Verena Platzgummer, Eurac Research - University Of Vienna
Veronika Hamann, PhD-Student, University Of Agder
Moderators
Aleksandra Gnach, ZHAW Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Junping Hou, AILA2020 Committee Member, Xi'an University; University Of Groningen
Valery Wyss, ZHAW Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Janine Strandberg, PhD Candidate, University Of Groningen
Audrey Rousse-Malpat, Chair Of Social Program, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
In January 2007, the first AILA Europe Junior Researchers Meeting (JMR) took place at the University of Groningen. Since then, the JRM has been held in various European countries, amongst them Ireland, Finland, Germany, and Switzerland and at this symposium we would like to integrate the JRM into the larger AILA conference. The aim of JRMs is to promote young researchers in Applied Linguistics from all over Europe by providing a platform in which they can present and discuss their research findings, ongoing studies and projects in an interactive and informal international environment. Junior Researchers include those working on their Master's and PhD theses, as well as those who have graduated within the last three years. In this symposium (two slots), we would like for junior researchers to present their papers on any topic within applied linguistics, but preferably on the conference theme "The dynamics of language, communication and culture in a changing world". Presenters will be asked about the kind of feedback or help they need and the organizers will invite designated senior researchers as commentators to foster questions and discussion.
Exploring the International Students’ Perceptions of the English Language Learning Ecology in an Irish Higher Education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Daniela Modrescu, Trinity College Dublin
This presentation introduces the aims and methodology of the researcher’s on-going PhD, which explores some international students’ perceptions of the English language learning ecology in an Irish Higher Education context in order to reflect on their implications for the EAP curriculum, and for the delivery of overall successful higher education experience.
Is English really the key language of institutional internationalisation processes? A case study of Spanish-based multilingual campuses
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Rosana Villares, University Of Zaragoza
I aim to explore how the relationship between internationalisation and English is represented in Spanish universities’ top-down documents using corpus linguistics techniques and critical discourse analysis. The analysis of overt and covert language ideologies and language management indicates powerful implications able to modify current language practices.
Prototypical associations in the production of words in English as a foreign language by L2 learners
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Jaqueline Mora, PhD Student , University Of La Rioja
Summary This ongoing study attempts to explore the role semantic prototypes and prototypical associations play in response to the production of words when learning English as a foreign language with groups of children and adolescent informants at the 6th and 12th forms in Spain. This research will contribute to the exploration of linguistic, cultural, and communicative characteristics in the learning of an FL
Students’ voices about English language learning in school and beyond
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Mariangel Carreño, Teacher Education Council, Uruguay
This qualitative research investigated what secondary students in an EFL context said about the process of learning English in school and beyond. I was interested in understanding why (and how) some students outperformed others in their L2 knowledge while sharing the same learning path in school.
Reading circles: Languaging and meaning co-construction with learners of English as a Second Language
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Madeleine Strobel, University Of Glasgow
Drawing on sociocultural theory, this paper presents preliminary findings from a non-interventional classroom observation PhD study of reading circles with young adult Swedish learners of English as a Second Language, aiming to understand how small-group conversations about novels in the target language can mediate language learning and meaning making.
The long-term effects of CLIL on individuals’ life courses: Retrospective narratives of 24 former pupils
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Anssi Roiha, University Of Turku
This presentation examines former pupils’ (n=24) perceptions of the effect of CLIL on their life courses. Most participants still used English actively and emphasized the role of CLIL in contributing to their positive English self-concept. The results imply that CLIL can work as one factor in guiding individuals’ life courses.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S010 1/2 | Applied linguistics in the professions: The value of transdisciplinarity in a changing world
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Henrik Rahm, Lund University
Séverine Wozniak, University Of Grenoble
Paola Konrad, Unisinos University
Steven Breunig, University Of Southern Denmark
Gianni De Nardi, Research Associate, ZHAW Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Misa Fujio, Toyo University
Moderators
Marlies Whitehouse, AILA Treasurer, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Lilly Göthe - AILA Volunteer, Volunteer, University Of Groningen
The relation and collaboration between researchers and practitioners has long been discussed within and across applied sciences and theoretical disciplines (see AILA Review 2018, 31, for a recent overview). However, research approaches claiming to combine theoretical and practical needs and expectations often lack either solid grounding in empirical data or thorough reflection from theoretical perspectives. This symposium aims to take the discussion further by rethinking transdisciplinarity systematically from theoretical and practical angles, inviting contributions both from cooperation with other disciplines as well as with practitioners. From theoretical angles, the contributions explain how and why transdisciplinary research contributes to further developing empirically grounded theories of language use in context in an increasingly digitized and glocalized professional world. From practical angles, the contributions elaborate on potential pitfalls and benefits practitioners can expect from collaborating with researchers from various disciplines. For example, how practitioners can engage in – and benefit from – research projects by co-creating knowledge together with academic researchers. Phases of such activity include identifying wicked problems, formulating pertinent research questions, developing shared languages, engaging in ongoing dialogue, finding results and conclusions based on mutual learning, as well as developing and implementing tools that foster sustainable solutions.
Code switching at the coffee break? On usage of English and Scandinavian languages in Danish professional contexts
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Henrik Rahm, Lund University
This presentation aims at discussing the preliminary findings of an ongoing Interreg-project involving NGOs and academics, aiming at an increased labour market flexibility between Sweden and Denmark. Results from questionnaires and focus group interviews will be presented. Focus is on language competencies and expectations on Danish and the Danish society.
Transdisciplinary Views on Professions: A Contribution by ESP Researchers
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Séverine Wozniak, University Of Grenoble
This paper aims at contributing to the characterization of specialized professional domains from the perspective of applied linguistics, more specifically ESP research. We deal with the fundamental notions of professions and professional identity, the three functions of specialized domains, as well as the relevance of ethnography as a support discipline for ESP research.
Police interrogation under scrutiny: Insights from a fine-grained interactional analysis to police interrogation practices
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Paola Konrad, Unisinos University
Co-authors :
Ana Cristina Ostermann, Professor, Applied Linguistics And Medical Education, Universidade Do Vale Do Rio Dos Sinos/UNISINOS
We analyze questions and answers in police interrogations. By means of Conversation Analysis, we investigate how the preservation of information concerning crimes unfolds in the above-mentioned event. The analysis reveals that this preservation is not only accomplished by the suspects, but also ensued by the police officers in their questions.
The learning needs of a 'DINFOS killer': The transdisciplinary practice of teaching strategic communication to US military members and Allies
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Steven Breunig, University Of Southern Denmark
The paper seeks to gain insight into the nature of teaching strategic communication to US military members and Allies for outlining the learning needs of communication practitioners in a digitalized mediated world and for contributing to theorizing transdisciplinary practice.
Analysing and optimising Informed Consent in cooperation with practitioners
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Gianni De Nardi, Research Associate, ZHAW Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
We present how we examine comprehension on various linguistic levels and identify obstacles to comprehension in the Informed Consent process using a mixed methods approach and cooperating with different groups of practitioners. Based on the results, we show how we aim to optimise the Informed Consent process on various levels.
Transdisciplinarity in Japanese Business Communication: New Directions of Collaboration between Professors and Professionals
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Misa Fujio, Toyo University
In this presentation, transdisciplinarity in business communication will be shared, based on in-depth interviews with Japanese scholar-practitioners. The challenges include confidentiality issues and insufficient understanding of Japanese corporations to research while opportunities include the possibility of raising not only individual but corporate reputation as part of ESG (Environment Social Governance).
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S013 1/2 | Building Disciplinary Literacies in CLIL
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Yanming Wu, University Of Hong Kong
Yasamin Habib, University Of Duisburg-Essen
Aline Bieri, University Of Basel
Niki Canham, Lancaster University
Ana Llinares, Autonomous University Of Madrid
Christiane Dalton-Puffer, University Of Vienna
Emily Edwards, Lecturer In Academic Language And Learning, University Of Technology Sydney
Rosalie Goldsmith, University Of Technology Sydney
Michael Kai-Yip Tsang, Yuen Long Merchants Association Secondary School
Anne McCabe, Saint Louis University
Julia Huettner, University Of Vienna
Juliet Langman, University Of Texas At San Antonio
Silvia Bauer-Marschallinger, University College Of Teacher Education Vienna/Krems & University Of Vienna
Tarja Nikula, University Of Jyväskylä
Thomas Hasenberger, PhD Student, Teacher, University Of Vienna
Diana Feick, Senior Lecturer, The University Of Auckland
Moderators
Julia Huettner, University Of Vienna
Christiane Dalton-Puffer, University Of Vienna
Seyit Omer Gok, AILA2021 Volunteer
Content-and-Language-Integrated-Learning (CLIL), especially targetting English, is by now undoubtedly part of mainstream education in Europe and matched by a vibrant research scene. Existing studies have highlighted the effects of CLIL on general foreign language competence, which are overall positive, but given the complementary nature of CLIL to EFL classes, this improvement is arguably not that surprising. In fact, the crucial question for CLIL practice and research is currently to identify its unique contribution to learning and conceptual development. This symposium argues that one of these contributions is the learning and use of English in the ways deemed appropriate in the specific subjects studied, e.g. History or Biology. We aim to bring together established and emerging scholars in applied linguistics and subject education to allow fruitful discussion of findings in diverse contexts and from a range of perspectives. Possible areas of focus include, but are not limited to: - terminology learning and use - the link between subject-related competence(s) and discourse competence(s) - genre use and learning - interface between L1 disciplinary language use and learning and L2 disciplinary language use and learning - participant perspectives on L2 disciplinary use and learning - pedagogical advice We are aiming for a mixture of presentations and poster presentationsS013 detailed programme, click here
Translanguaging/Trans-semiotizing in the flow of dialogic knowledge co-making in a CLIL biology class in Hong Kong: A Case Study
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yanming Wu, University Of Hong Kong
Adopting a dialogic and dynamic process view of human meaning-making and the thematic pattern perspective, this study delineates the translanguaging/trans-semiotizing practices of an experienced science teacher trying out a CLIL approach in a Grade 10 biology class in Hong Kong, yielding important implications for the development of productive CLIL pedagogies.
“The groundwater uh sammelt sich in oceans…” – Young EFL Learners’ Use of Academic Language in Bilingual Science
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yasamin Habib, University Of Duisburg-Essen
This project addresses the use of the first (or school) language in bilingual science teaching in primary school and attempts to shed light on “effective” lesson practices in order to foster dual-subject literacy.
The role of technicality in CLIL (English) and non-CLIL (German) biology lessons
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Aline Bieri, University Of Basel
This paper presents a quantitative and qualitative analysis of technicality in CLIL and non-CLIL biology lessons. It aims to demonstrate that even in languages as closely related as English and German, technicality can be an issue, and has implications for how we teach biology in English and German.
Linguistic repertoire development in two Austrian English-medium CLIL mathematics classrooms
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Niki Canham, Lancaster University
Drawing on a ten-month longitudinal study of two Austrian English-medium CLIL secondary school classrooms, this presentation examines the teaching-and-learning of mathematics through English. I discuss how teachers and students simultaneously use and develop linguistic repertories, including L1 and L2 mathematics registers, and the implications for language sensitive pedagogy.
CLIL students’ production of cognitive discourse functions: a comparative study between Spanish and Finnish students
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Ana Llinares, Autonomous University Of Madrid
Co-authors :
Tarja Nikula, University Of Jyväskylä
This presentation examines Cognitive Discourse Functions (CDFs) in CLIL students’ written production of academic content in L2 in social science subjects. The data by primary school students in Finland and Spain will be analysed with attention to the frequency of CDFs and to the fluency and complexity of their realizations.
Fostering academic literacy in a German studies program in New Zealand
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Diana Feick, Senior Lecturer, The University Of Auckland
 This presentation reports on the implementation of CLIL for German applied linguistics courses – a context which is typically English dominated. As part of their assignments students were asked to write reading journals in the target language. The study illustrates how they develop their (academic) writing skills and bilingual language awareness.
Establishing a university-wide, integrated approach to developing L2 disciplinary literacies for students with low levels of academic language proficiency
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Emily Edwards, Lecturer In Academic Language And Learning, University Of Technology Sydney
Rosalie Goldsmith, University Of Technology Sydney
We present and evaluate a recently-trialled approach to integrating L2 disciplinary literacies through collaboration between Academic Language and Learning and faculty staff in an Australian university. The mixed-methods evaluation provides insights, from multiple perspectives, into the complexities of L2 disciplinary literacies beliefs and practices in this context.
Investigating the Feasibility of Teaching through Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) in an EFL Classroom in Taiwan
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Michael Kai-Yip Tsang, Yuen Long Merchants Association Secondary School
This study examines the extent of effectiveness of CLIL, an emerging teaching pedagogy in Taiwan, in a Grade 11 Taipei classroom with discussion of achievements, challenges and implications behind for shedding some insights for Taiwan educators for adapting the coming new curriculum reform.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S024 1/2 | Connecting second language acquisition research to language testing
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Kei Miyazaki, Tokai University
Parvaneh Tavakoli, University Of Reading
Elisa Guggenbichler, University Of Innsbruck
Wenjun Ding, PhD Candidate, University Of Bristol
Xiaomei Ma, Xi'an Jiaotong University
Sathena Chan, Senior Lecturer In Language Assessment, University Of Bedfordshire
Kathrin Eberharter, University Of Innsbruck
Andrea Revesz, UCL Institute Of Education
Dina Tsagari, Professor, Oslo Metropolitan University
Jianling Liao, Arizona State University
Mark Chapman, Director Of Test Development, WIDA, University Of Wisconsin-Madison
Jing Xu, Principal Research Manager, Cambridge Assessment English
Kahoko Matsumoto, Tokai University
Taiko Tsuchihira, Seitoku University
Masatoshi Nagahashi, Tokyo Kosen: National Institute Of Technology, Tokyo College
Moderators
Parvaneh Tavakoli, University Of Reading
Chihiro Inoue, Senior Lecturer In Language Assessment, University Of Bedfordshire
Saioa Cipitria, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
This symposium focuses on how second language acquisition (SLA) research and language testing can inform one another to understand key issues related to language proficiency and to validate language tests. While there is common agreement that the two fields can mutually benefit from one another, research findings emerging from the two fields do not always reach the other community. The symposium proposed here aims at bringing researchers from these two fields closer together to highlight in what ways the findings of their studies can inform theory and practice in the other discipline. The first featured speakers (Inoue and Tavakoli) will summarize the findings of research into task performance and their implications for language testing. The second speaker (Andrea Revesz) will highlight the implications of studies investigating the use of eye-tracking for language testing.
Are benefits of second language acquisition and Language testing a two-way street?
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Chihiro Inoue, Senior Lecturer In Language Assessment, University Of Bedfordshire
Parvaneh Tavakoli, University Of Reading
This prime aim of this opening talk is to argue that the relationship between second language acquisition (SLA) and language testing (LT) is a bilateral commitment with reciprocal interests and benefits. [THE SYMPOSIUM TIMETABLE CAN BE FOUND HERE: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1KowrRBeCwTTFEiAUkAON9ojK1HlUT66-/view?usp=sharing]
Exploring learners’ cognitive processes during writing using eye-tracking, keystroke logging and stimulated recalls
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Elisa Guggenbichler, University Of Innsbruck
Co-authors :
Kathrin Eberharter, University Of Innsbruck
Benjamin Kremmel, University Of Innsbruck
The study reports on an EFL writing test validation project. Subjects from diverse educational backgrounds responded to two tasks in front of an eye tracker. They produced stimulated recalls which were combined with measures of proficiency, typing speed and eye movements to map participants’ cognitive processes across levels and tasks.
Investigation of integrated-skills test taking strategies in Japanese educational contexts
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kei Miyazaki, Tokai University
Kahoko Matsumoto, Tokai University
Taiko Tsuchihira, Seitoku University
Masatoshi Nagahashi, Tokyo Kosen: National Institute Of Technology, Tokyo College
The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate various test-taking strategies that 103 Japanese students utilized dealing with TOEFL®-iBT integrated-skills test items. The study revealed that the students used a variety of cognitive and metacognitive strategies which appear to be influenced by their different subskill combinations and proficiency levels.
Exploring cognitive validity of causal explanation speaking tasks for young EFL learners in China
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Wenjun Ding, PhD Candidate, University Of Bristol
This study investigates the cognitive validity of computerized picture-based causal explanation speaking tasks by integrating eye tracking and stimulated recalls among 96 young EFL learners aged from 9 to 12 in a state-funded primary school in China. It explores young EFL learners' L2 performance of causal explanation speaking tasks and cognitive processes during the L2 task performance in relation to their age, L2 vocabulary size, L1 task performance and L1 cognitive processes. 
Towards Assessment for Learning: Polytomous Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment in EFL Writing
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Xiaomei Ma, Xi'an Jiaotong University
Xiaoting Shi, Xi'an Jiaotong University
Meng Lv, Xi'an Jiaotong University
This paper presents how a polytomous cognitive diagnostic model is used in EFL writing assessment for Chinese EFL learners. It developed, modified and validated a descriptor-based multi-level rating scale by which a Q-Matrix was established and Sequential-DINA Model was applied to produce a fine-grained diagnostic score report, entirely different from the traditional one. It significantly facilitates assessment for learning and personalized instruction.  
Summarising skills at different proficiency levels: Rater perspectives on reading-into-writing and listening-into-writing performances
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sathena Chan, Senior Lecturer In Language Assessment, University Of Bedfordshire
Research on L2 summarizing skills at different proficiency levels is limited. The presentation reports a study which aimed to, from the perspective of raters, identify the features of summary at five proficiency levels on two integrated task types. The presentation will also discuss how task features might influence learners’ performance.
Expanding the concept of rater cognition and the role of individual attributes in rating speaking performances
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kathrin Eberharter, University Of Innsbruck
Using human raters is a major validity concern for language testers and researchers. This mixed-methods study examined the role of psychological and cognitive attributes in rater cognition when assessing EFL speaking performances. It investigated whether decision-making styles, cognitive preferences or cognitive capacities were related to rating quality and rating behaviours.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S029 2/2 | Critical Thinking and Language Integrated Teaching
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Suhair Al-Alami, Al Ghurair University
Yuqin Hei, Xi'an International Studies University
Shengkai Yin, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Yunian Xu, Presenter , Central South University
Yang Liu, Beijing Institute Of Technology
Yoshio Hoso, Waseda University Honjo Senior High School
Limin Jin, Beijing Foreign Studies University
Yan Wang, Nanjing University
Lian Zhang, Beijing Foreign Studies University
Youzhong Sun, Beijing Foreign Studies University
Moderators
Youzhong Sun, Beijing Foreign Studies University
Limin Jin, Beijing Foreign Studies University
In EFL (English as a Foreign Language) countries, conventional ELT focused on language knowledge, skills and communicative competence. However, it has been recognized by many philosophers, psychologists, and applied linguists that language has a close relationship with thinking and cognition. As critical thinking is at the heart of tertiary education, developing critical thinking simultaneously in English language teaching (ELT) becomes vital for aspiring university students, and teachers around the world are encouraged to integrate critical thinking in ELT. Till now, little is known about teachers' and policy makers' conceptions, beliefs and practice about integrating critical thinking in ELT, and how critical thinking is conceived and realized in ELT, including curriculum, teaching methods and textbooks, varies considerably. This symposium addresses this issue by discussing the following questions: What is the relationship between language competence and critical thinking? Why is it necessary to integrate critical thinking in ELT? How can critical thinking pedagogy be realized in different ways in various contexts? Are there any educational reforms which attempt to engage critical thinking in ELT? Are there any challenges encountered in the reform? The discussions will offer valuable insights for developing both content and pedagogical knowledge of teaching critical thinking skills in ELT.
Principles of Language and Critical Thinking Integrated Teaching: TERRIFIC
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Youzhong Sun, Beijing Foreign Studies University
This presentation proposes eight principles (TERRIFIC) for language and critical thinking integrated instruction: targeting, evaluating, routinizing, reflecting, inquiring, fulfilling, integrating, and content. Implementing these principles will bring about teaching innovation and quality improvement in ELT, contributing to the whole-person education of English programs in universities.
Integrated development of L2 speaking and critical thinking skills: The case of an educational reform
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Limin Jin, Beijing Foreign Studies University
Foreign language departments need to fulfill an educational goal and go beyond the purpose of L2 development. In this presentation I will introduce a curriculum reform that integrates the development of critical thinking skills in the teaching of L2 English speaking, including background, activity design, and findings from empirical research.
Peer Interactions in L2 Critical Listening
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yan Wang, Nanjing University
This research aims to find out whether interactions help develop students’ language abilities and critical thinking skills. The results show that interactions significantly influence more complex tasks. Interactions help produce negotiations of meaning and form, make students pay more attention to the listening process, and practice more in critical thinking.
Integrating Critical Thinking Development into EFL Writing Curriculum: An Activity Theory Proposal
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Lian Zhang, Beijing Foreign Studies University
This presentation reports innovative changes in a Chinese college EFL writing curriculum. Following Activity Theory, it analyzes the students’ learning process and factors were identified mediating the process. They were students’ motives, types of class activities, the instructor, the utilization of the mediation tools and the introduction of rules.
A Proposal for Adapting the Question Formulation Technique (QFT) to Focus Attention on Logicality in Essay Writing in Japanese Classrooms
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yoshio Hoso, Waseda University Honjo Senior High School
The purpose of this study is to investigate a method of giving feedback on essay writing in order to focus students' attention on logicality. Students' comments on using the Question Formulation Technique (QFT) for writing an essay need to be analyzed to examine whether students are paying attention to logicality in their essay writing.
Critical Thinking Skills Exemplified in English Public Speaking Course of Science and Engineering Majors in Chinese Universities: Problems and Instruction
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yang Liu, Beijing Institute Of Technology
The present study explored the critical thinking skills exemplified in the English public speaking course of science and engineering college students. A qualitative analysis of their English speeches revealed two categories of problems: external and internal ones. Teaching methods corresponding to each category were discussed.
Literature as a means for enhancing critical thinking and developing foreign language skills.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Suhair Al-Alami, Al Ghurair University
With quality education in mind, this presentation offers thought-provoking suggestions on how literary texts can be utilized to promote students’ critical thinking and enhance their foreign language skills. The presentation is based on empirical research undertaken at a private university in the United Arab Emirates for one academic year.
Teaching Chinese EFL Students English Academic Writing from the Perspective of Genre Transfer
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yuqin Hei, Xi'an International Studies University
Academic writing in English is argumentative in nature. To develop EFL students’ academic writing competence, instruction must go beyond teaching argument essays for writing courses and tests. This paper explores how the argument genre can be transferred to students’ learning and writing in different disciplines, using argument as a tool.
The effect of critical thinking on the construct of integrated speaking tasks
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Shengkai Yin, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
The current study has established a strong link between task takers' critical thinking ability and their speaking performances by modelling a devised spoken discourse analysis.
Integrative Course Design Approaches of Medical English: MOOCS vs Classic Classroom Programs
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yunian Xu, Presenter , Central South University
Integration in Medical English programs may have various conditions and learners. In classroom teaching and in MOOCs’ program the learners may have various knowledge background and learning demand. When dealing with the different program, the teacher should be flexible and try their best to meet the demands and to suit the situation.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S031 1/2 | Cross-linguistic similarity in language learning and use
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Scott Jarvis, University Of Utah
Lari-Valtteri Suhonen, Lund University
Aleksi Palokangas, University Of Helsinki
Gijs Leenders, Presenter, Utrecht University
Robert Taferner, Hiroshima University
Carles Fuster, Stockholm University
Lena Bien-Miller, University Of Koblenz-Landau
Furong Wang, Xi'an Jiaotong University
Malin Ågren, Presenter At Symposium On Crosslinguistic Similarity And SLA, Lund University
Eva Knopp, Radboud University
Ilmari Ivaska, University Of Turku
Annika Andersson, Linnaeus University
Annekatrin Kaivapalu, Symposium S031 Organizer, University Of Eastern Finland
Nadja Kerschhofer-Puhalo, Post-doc Researcher, PI Literacies & Multilingualism Research Group, University Of Vienna
Moderators
Scott Jarvis, University Of Utah
Annekatrin Kaivapalu, Symposium S031 Organizer, University Of Eastern Finland
Joanna Porkert , AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
The symposium addresses cross-linguistic similarity as an underlying factor all through the language learning, development and use. Learning a new language (TL) is always based on the knowledge of the first (L1) or any formerly learned language (Ln). The starting point is what is similar between the TL and L1 or Ln. The similarity can be divided into actual (objective), perceived, or assumed. Particularly the comprehension of a closely related TL is greatly dependent on the perceptions of similarity across the languages. The construct of similarity, however, has not been much discussed or empirically studied. The aim of the proposed symposium is to fill this cap and to bring together empirical research on it, to advance the methodology of defining and measuring similarity across languages. Also the enhancement of language users' ability to perceive similarity by increasing their metalinguistic awareness requires a better understanding of the concept of similarity. In this symposium, cross-linguistic similarity is examined from three perspectives: 1) best practices for measuring cross-linguistic similarity using both objective and subjective (psycholinguistic) measures; 2) the effects of receptive multilingualism on language learning and use; and 3) the effects of metalinguistic awareness on language learners' ability to recognize cross-linguistic similarities.
Priming methodology as a tool for exploring unconscious perceptions of cross-linguistic similarity
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Annekatrin Kaivapalu, Symposium S031 Organizer, University Of Eastern Finland
This presentation addresses unconscious perceptions of morphological similarity, with the main focus on the applicability of priming methodology as a tool for the research purposes on the bases of the participants’ reflections. The results will be discussed in terms of the design and the content of the task.
Language comparison as a method for measuring metalinguistic awareness in mono-and multilinguals
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Lena Bien-Miller, University Of Koblenz-Landau
Anja Wildemann, University Of Koblenz-Landau
The presentation focuses on the question of how metalinguistic awareness in monolinguals and multilinguals can be measured and whether there are differences between the metalinguistic awareness of monolinguals and multilinguals. A method to make metalinguistic awareness visible using language comparison and to measure it will be presented.
How Does Context and Language Level Affect on Receptive Multilingualism on Finnic Languages?
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Aleksi Palokangas, University Of Helsinki
The presentation will focus on mutual intelligibility on Finnish, Estonian, and languages that are closely related to them. I will represent how I am about to organise a test where Finnish testees translate written Estonian, and Estonian testees translate written Finnish. Both groups will also translate Vepsian and Livonian.
Cross-linguistic influence and fine-grained placement verb semantics: Evidence from ERPs and appropriateness ratings
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Annika Andersson, Linnaeus University
Co-authors :
Marianne Gullberg, Lund University
We report on cross-linguistic influence on ERP indices of online L2 processing of fine-grained placement verb semantics, looking at L2 users whose L1 does (German) or does not (English) share semantic structure with the L2 (Swedish). In contrast to previous ERP findings, CLI effects are detected.
Are receptive multilingual strategies transferrable?
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Eva Knopp, Radboud University
This presentation reports on an interventional study that investigated (1) in how far German and Dutch students can profit from instruction in decoding strategies involving receptive multilingualism when decoding the previously unknown neighbor language and (2) in how far these skills are transferrable to a typologically unrelated language (i.e. Maltese).
A Cross-linguistic Intervention to Promote Language Awareness in Dutch Secondary Education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Gijs Leenders, Presenter, Utrecht University
Co-authors :
Rick De Graaff, Mentor ; Coordinator Of Symposium S084, Utrecht University | UAS Utrecht
In this study we address two questions: 1. What knowledge is used by students in L1 (Dutch) grammar tasks and 2. To what extent is their L1 knowledge transferable to their L2 (English and German)?
Cross-linguistic similarity and the L2 acquisition of French subject-verb agreement
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Malin Ågren, Presenter At Symposium On Crosslinguistic Similarity And SLA, Lund University
Co-authors :
Marie-Eve Michot
Cyrille Granget
Pascale Hadermann
Sonia Gerolimich, Lecturer, University Of Udine (Italy)
Isabelle Stabarin
This study investigates the effect of cross-linguistic similarity on the production of verb morphology in L2 French. The study involves four source languages (Flemish, German, Italian and Swedish). We discuss the relative impact of cross-linguistic similarity in relation to other factors, such as proficiency level, verb frequency and verb type.
Objective, subjective, and conscious cross-linguistic similarity as predictors of intentionality in lexical transfer
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Lari-Valtteri Suhonen, Lund University
The study tested vocabulary acquisition of a pseudo-language in Swedish–English bilinguals. A computerized paired-associate learning task was used to teach form-meaning mappings. A learning assessment task was administered after each block. The primary research question was whether subjective typology measures predict conscious and unconscious performance in post-learning outcomes.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S048 1/2 | Foreign Language Classroom Interaction from a Micro-Analytical Perspective: Implications for Educational Practice
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Goetz Schwab, Professor Of Applied Linguistics, Ludwigsburg University Of Education
Karen Glaser, University Of Leipzig
Holger Limberg, European University Of Flensburg
Jaume Batlle, University Of Barcelona
Katherina Walper, Austral University Of Chile
Devran Demir, Hacettepe University
Gözde Balıkçı, Kahramanmaras Sütçü Imam University
Jing Wei, Southwest University
Revert Klattenberg, University Of Hildesheim
Yoshiko Usui, Dokkyo University
Moderators
Revert Klattenberg, University Of Hildesheim
Sara Razaghi AILA Volunteer, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
An increasing number of people worldwide are learning and speaking foreign or second languages, and the institutionalised practice of language teaching and learning has generated serious academic interest in the field of Applied Linguistics for a long time. Research based on conversation analysis (CA) methodology, for instance, has contributed to a better understanding of the multifaceted and complex nature of the classroom as a social setting and of how teaching and learning are accomplished in classroom interaction. In language teaching and learning, however, such methodologies are far from being considered mainstream. There is still a need for further research in order to obtain a better understanding of educational practices (feedback, instructions, disciplining etc.) and how they are influenced by classroom activities and teaching objectives. Most importantly, to facilitate successful teaching and learning, these micro-analytical findings need to be linked to educational reality. This symposium therefore invites researchers who explore the institutional practices involved in the teaching and learning of foreign or second languages. It discusses how these findings can inform educational practices such as teaching methodology, material design, language testing, curricula and language policies.Welcome to the first part of the symposium. There will be a 'live' featured presentation and Q&A starting at 08:30 (CEST). This is followed by recorded talks and live Q&A (10 minutes each). To participate, please watch the respective videos. Then add your questions, comments, etc., to the Q&A area and join live for discussion (see schedule below). If you have questions/comments during the live Q&A and would like to speak, you can use the hand raise feature of the embedded Zoom environment to let us know. SCHEDULELIVE PRESENTATION AND Q&A: 08:30 – 09.20| Götz Schwab (featured): A beneficial look at classroom interaction research and its implications for teacher educationWATCH: 09:20 – 09:45 | Karen Glaser: Instruction-giving in the English as a Foreign Language classroom - studying classroom interaction to inform teacher trainingLIVE: 09:45 – 09:55 | Q&A with KarenWATCH: 09:55 – 10.20 | Holger Limberg: Classroom Interactional Competence of Primary School EFL TeachersLIVE: 10:20 – 10:30 | Q&A with HolgerWATCH: 10:30 – 10:50 | Jaume Batlle: Teachers Multimodal Resources for Peer Repair in Spanish as a Foreign Language ClassroomLIVE: 10:50 – 11:00 | Q&A with JaumeWATCH: 11:00 – 11:20 | Katherina Walper: Chilean secondary EFL teachers' multimodal resources to pursue student-next actionLIVE: 11:20 – 11:30 | Q&A with KatherinaWATCH: 11:30 – 11:50 | Devran Demir: "Was heißt x?" A contingent resource in non-topic-initial positions in L2 German classroom interactionLIVE: 11:50 – 12:00 | Q&A with Devran
A beneficial look at classroom interaction research and its implications for teacher education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Goetz Schwab, Professor Of Applied Linguistics, Ludwigsburg University Of Education
Along a number of samples from language classrooms in different contexts, this paper will focus on the question of how micro-analytic informed research can be applied to the very teaching of interactional awareness and interactional competences to future language teachers.
Instruction-giving in the English as a Foreign Language classroom - studying classroom interaction to inform teacher training
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Karen Glaser, University Of Leipzig
Comparing two instruction-giving (IG) sequences by pre-service primary EFL teachers, the talk seeks to identify reasons for the respective (in)effectiveness of the IG and to derive implications for teacher training such as the crucial role of prior planning, sequencing, precise verbal delivery, organization of social forms, and use of artefacts.
Classroom Interactional Competence of Primary School EFL Teachers
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Holger Limberg, European University Of Flensburg
This talk presents and discusses corpus data of primary school EFL classrooms to explore how language teachers conduct lessons with young learners and how they display Classroom Interactional Competence (cf. Walsh 2006) in and through their teaching practices.
Teachers Multimodal Resources for Peer Repair in Spanish as a Foreign Language Classroom
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Jaume Batlle, University Of Barcelona
This paper analyses how multimodal resources are treated by teachers to manage and promote peer repair in Spanish as a Foreign Language classroom interaction. The analysis shows that teachers mainly manage peer repair by heading and gazing to give the floor and give the students the willingness to participate.
Chilean secondary EFL teachers’ multimodal resources to pursue student-next action
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Katherina Walper, Austral University Of Chile
This study explores the role of embodied practices in pursued elicitation sequences. Data was collected in Chilean secondary EFL classrooms. Analysis follows a multimodal CA Approach. It identifies teachers’ gestures, gaze shifts, and manipulation of teaching materials and explanations, repetitions and designedly incomplete turns in pursuing student relevant next action.
“Was heißt x?” A contingent resource in non-topic-initial positions in L2 German classroom interaction
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Devran Demir, Hacettepe University
Co-authors :
Goetz Schwab, Professor Of Applied Linguistics, Ludwigsburg University Of Education
This study analyses one specific form of display questions (“Was heißt x/What does x mean?”) as a contingent resource in non-topic-initial positions in L2 German classroom interaction. Using conversation analysis to closely examine video-recordings in oral communication classes, we provide theoretical and practical implications for L2 German classrooms.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S064 | Interaction in Medical Care
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Jack Pun, City University Of Hong Kong
Isabel Colon De Carvajal, ICAR Laboratory (ENS De Lyon)
Lucas Seuren, Health Services Researcher, University Of Oxford
Emma Brooks, Lecturer, University College London (UCL)
Benjamin Quasinowski, Research Assistant, University Of Duisburg-Essen
Staci Defibaugh, Old Dominion University
JEFF BEZEMER, University College London
Moderators
Mike Huiskes, University Of Groningen
Tom Koole, University Of Groningen
Mieke Breukelman (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer
Over the last decades much collaboration has been established between medical professionals and researchers of language and social interaction. This is apparent in a large stream of publications, often with applied purposes, and regular international conferences such as CACE (Conversation Analysis of Clinical Encounters), COMET (Conference on Communication, Medicine, and Ethics) and various social interaction oriented events initiated in the medical professions such as meetings of EACH (International Association for Communication in Healthcare). Social interaction studies originally focused almost exclusively on doctor-patient interaction with questions such as 'how can a doctor present a patient with the interactional space to present his/her concerns' or 'how can doctors implement shared-decision-making'? Lately, social interaction researchers have started to deal also with interaction between medical professionals such as the communication during surgery and the hand-over communication between different shifts of medical staff. These two topics, doctor-patient and doctor-doctor interaction, will also be addressed in this symposium. The aim of the symposium is to present recent social interaction studies of medical communication in these two domains and to explicitly address the collaboration between social interaction researchers and medical professionals for applied purposes of medical training.
Better nursing handover communication: translational research in a bilingual Hong Kong hospital
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Jack Pun, City University Of Hong Kong
This paper reports the research about Better Nursing Handover training at a bilingual hospital in Hong Kong. A communication training was delivered to 50 nurses based on actual practices and a new communication protocol, focusing on the ISBAR structure and the quality of care, namely CARE protocol. We will explain how we developed our educational module in response to the communication problems identified in video-recorded handovers. After assessing the communication issues from the framework of the interactional and informational strategies, we conclude by highlighting the differences between how the nurses conducted the handovers before and after the training.
From psychiatric care practices to research: the CIPSY project dialogue
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Isabel Colon De Carvajal, ICAR Laboratory (ENS De Lyon)
The goal of the project CIPSY is to study the interactional competence of the nurse in adult psychiatric service. It responds to an external request from an psychiatric hospital in Lyon, that expressed the need for an experimental research, considering that the patient-caregiver relationship, as well as the appropriate care management, is strongly at stake.
Talking to patients, talking to caregivers: how technology drives the participation framework in video consultations
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Lucas Seuren, Health Services Researcher, University Of Oxford
Co-authors :
Sara Shaw
The conventional arrangement of participants during video-mediated interaction stimulates dyadic interaction. This has implications for video consultations, as older patients in particular often rely on family members and/or caregivers who may now be excluded. We demonstrate how technology provides constraints and affordances and how that can affect quality of care.
Glossing controversy: the role of facework in navigating trauma
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Emma Brooks, Lecturer, University College London (UCL)
Drawing on an observation of an antenatal consultation with a trafficked woman, this presentation explores the range of face-saving strategies (Goffman, 1972) employed by the patient's consultant and her interpreter, as they seek to navigate the series of events which have led to this visit.
Entanglements of medical case knowledge and gossip: Change-of-shift reports in a Kazakh medical space
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Benjamin Quasinowski, Research Assistant, University Of Duisburg-Essen
This paper examines change-of-shift reports of an emergency medical service unit in a rural hospital in Kazakhstan. These reports are essential for providing decision makers with crucial information about patients, but they also provide opportunities for gossip about members of the local community.
Small stories, direct reported speech, and patient identities in medical visits
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Staci Defibaugh, Old Dominion University
The stories patients bring to healthcare encounters are not exclusively narratives of illness, but narratives of health and personal engagement. Analysis of small stories told through the use of direct reported speech reveal an attempt at constructing an identity of a whole person or an identity beyond the patient in the room. This is done through stories of personal humor, accountability in medical care and engagement with both family members and other providers.
Can you do chest compression? Planning work in a resuscitation team
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
JEFF BEZEMER, University College London
This paper explores how members of resuscitation teams in a hospital plan their work through requests for and offers of participation in courses of action.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S091 3/4 | Learning through leisure: Informal Second Language Learning in the 21st century
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Phil Benson, Macquarie University
Chun Lai, University Of Hong Kong
Liss Kerstin Sylvén, University Of Gothenburg
Christina Lyrigkou, The Open University
Hongying Peng, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
Marcus Warnby, Stockholm University
Moderators
Denyze TOFFOLI, Symposium Organiser, Mentor, University Of Toulouse
Henriette Arndt, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Lund University
Marlene Schwarz, University Of Vienna
Meryl Kusyk, Karlsruhe University Of Education
Mark Van Huizen, AILA2021 Volunteer
The last 10 years have seen the birth of a new field within applied linguistics, embracing all sorts of language acquisition outside the classroom. With the rapid development and spread of new technologies, informal language contact has become commonplace for many L2 learners. While this can take many different forms, online contexts are a major driving force because they present L2 learners with unprecedented opportunities for exposure to and use of target language(s) regardless of their physical location. Research on this topic has emerged concurrently from diverse contexts. As a result, a variety of terms have been used to describe it (including Extramural English, Informal Digital Learning of English or Online Informal Learning of English), each of which emphasises particular aspects of the informal practices studied. Early research tended to focus on English as a target language, but more recently research on other languages is becoming more prominent. The purpose of this symposium, organized by Denyze Toffoli and colleagues, is to bring together researchers working on informal L2 practices to engage in critical dialogue about the scope of this field and to share their diverse theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches and findings. Our featured speakers are Geoffrey Sockett, Mark Dressman and Phil Benson.
Mapping spaces of language learning beyond the classroom
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Phil Benson, Macquarie University
This presentation argues for space as a crucial dimension of informal language learning. It discusses research that maps international students’ language learning in Sydney, Australia, and suggests that students’ use of the spaces of the city is a key factor in individual differences in engagement in informal language learning.
Nature of Informal Language Learning with Technology and Vocabulary Development
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Chun Lai, University Of Hong Kong
This study documented the nature of university learners’ self-initiated and self-directed use of technology for vocabulary learning in the informal learning contexts and explored the relationship between different types of technological experiences and different aspects of vocabulary knowledge
Exposure to L2 English and its correlation to oral proficiency among very young learners
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Liss Kerstin Sylvén, University Of Gothenburg
This presentation focuses on L2 English exposure and oral proficiency among 4-8 year-old children in Sweden. Data consist of language diaries, a receptive vocabulary test and an oral picture description task. Findings indicate a clear correlation between amount of exposure, and receptive vocabulary proficiency. Implications for L2 English teaching are discussed.
The role of informal second language learning in the spoken use of discourse markers
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Christina Lyrigkou, The Open University
Learner-initiated engagement with English through leisure activities is common amongst many learners globally. The present study explores Greek adolescent learners and the effect of their informal second language learning in their use of discourse markers in spoken production.
A holistic person-centred approach to informal mobile-assisted language use and development
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Hongying Peng, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
Co-authors :
Sake Jager, Projectmanager Teaching And Learning Innovation / Assistant Professor Applied Linguistics, University Of Groningen
Wander Lowie, University Of Groningen
We present a person-centred approach to informal mobile language learning. After explicating theoretical principles and methodological decisions, we will illustrate with an empirical study that examined L2 learners’ learning experiences afforded by their selective use of varied mobile technologies out of class, and then conclude with implications for future research.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S094 1/2 | Talking about Talk: Examining Social Life through Metalanguage
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Cara Penry Williams, University Of Derby
Chi-Hua Hsiao, Tunghai University
Andrea Leone-Pizzighella, University Of Pennsylvania
Cedric Deschrijver, Ming Chuan University
Florian Busch, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg
Anne Larsen, University Of Copenhagen
Annelie Ädel, Dalarna University
Elena Cotos, Iowa State University
Ellen Bijvoet, Uppsala University & The Language Council Of Sweden
Kristina Ehrsam, St. Gallen University Of Teacher Education
Robert Moore, University Of Pennsylvania
Moderators
Andrea Leone-Pizzighella, University Of Pennsylvania
Cedric Deschrijver, Ming Chuan University
Sannah Debreczeni (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer
Researchers in applied linguistics are increasingly focused on shifting modes of engagement, 'glocal' information flows, and superdiverse communicative styles. Metalanguage-or talk about talk-has proven to be an invaluable research lens in these complex settings, allowing researchers access to participants' "emic" interpretations of real-time interactional dynamics and social contexts. The reflexive nature of language-in-use is proving to be a rich analytical resource in, e.g., medical encounters, education spaces, and online spaces. However, an integrated theory of metalanguage as a research lens has yet to be developed. This symposium aims to aid in this development by answering the following questions: (a) How can metalanguage be used as a lens for revealing how interlocutors orient to, and interpret, situated communication? (b) How does metalanguage provide insights to changes in social relations over time? The first question is addressed in Subtheme 1: Metalanguage in synchronous discourse. We invite papers with a systematic focus on talk-about-talk in either real or virtual "face-to-face" interactions (e.g., those happening in real-time). The second question will be addressed in Subtheme 2: Metalanguage in asynchronous discourse. We invite papers that explore metalanguage in, e.g., policy discourse, online comments sections, social media, or other discourses taking place over time.
The ‘how’ of talking about talk: A framework detailing the mechanisms of metapragmatic evaluation
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Cara Penry Williams, University Of Derby
This paper presents a framework for analysing the ‘how’ of folklinguistic discourse. It describes mention in contrast to voicing and then subcategories based on speaker role, type of double voicing, interactional details, and language ideologies. It allows for detailed classification of talk about talk, to provide insights into social life.
“In the way you speak, be just who you are”: The use of metalanguage during live-streaming performance
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Chi-Hua Hsiao, Tunghai University
This study adopts a discourse analysis-based approach to investigate streamers' and viewers' metalanguage encompassing evaluation of language use, including one's own, in Taiwan's live-streaming programs. 
Metapragmatic framings of “dialect” in Italian speech situations
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Andrea Leone-Pizzighella, University Of Pennsylvania
This presentation discusses examples of metalinguistic commentary and metapragmatic frames around performances of “dialect” in Italian speech situations. Treating dialect as a “shifter” (Silverstein 1976), this presentation argues for the indispensable nature of metalinguistic commentary in both defining “dialect” from an emic perspective and understanding its interactional function in context.
Metalanguage in Online Newspaper Comments: Prevalence and Types of Discussions on Terminology
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Cedric Deschrijver, Ming Chuan University
The paper presents an overview of the occurrence of metalanguage in online newspaper comment boards. It distinguishes several categories of metalanguage, both formally and functionally, and discusses how each category provides different insights into social relations. Finally, the importance of analysing metalanguage in online contexts is highlighted.
Enregistering gender in everyday texting: A metapragmatic approach to graphemic variation and social positioning in digitally mediated communication
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Florian Busch, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg
The paper addresses adolescents’ ethnometapragmatic accounts of graphemic features in their everyday texting by investigating underlying ideologies of gender. By drawing on a sample of 48 German text-messaging-chatlogs and 7 semi structured interviews with the same informants, the paper examines the emergence of enregistered styles of gender in digital communication.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S099 3/3 | Multilingual education or how to learn to teach multilingual learning
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Annaliina Gynne, Senior Lecturer, Mälardalen University
Denis Weger, University Of Vienna
Elisabeth Nilsson, Umeå University
Orly Haim, Pedagogical Advisor, Chair Of The Council Of The Faculty Of Education (Beit Berl College), Beit Berl College; Tel Aviv University, Israel
Lena Schwarzl, University Of Vienna
Valéria Schörghofer-Queiroz, University Of Vienna
Manon Plasschaert, Teacher, Education Nationale
Nathalie Blanc, Associate Professor / AFLA Vice President, Université Lyon 1
Adrian Lundberg, Malmö University
Maryann Christison, University Of Utah
Anna Krulatz, NTNU
Gisela Mayr, Free University Of Bolzano
Moderators
Eva Vetter, Mentor, University Of Vienna
Nikolay Slavkov, University Of Ottawa
Lotte De Haan (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer
Around the world multilingual learning arrangements have evolved over several decades with the aim of enhancing equity in education. More recently a growing body of research has not only produced a myriad of concepts (plurilingualism, translanguaging, metro-, poly- and other -lingualisms) but also valuable insights into the complexities of multilingual learning and teaching, coupled with calls for continuous pedagogical, institutional, and technological innovation to address these complexities. The significant contributions, changing roles, and professional development of teachers have also recently come to the forefront. At the same time, statistics indicate that plurilingual learners face more obstacles for their academic success than those who are categorized as monolingual students (OECD, 2018). This symposium addresses multilingual teaching, learning and innovation as relevant challenges for Applied Linguistics connecting research from different fields within the discipline. Two sub-themes are proposed: 1) teaching and learning for/in multilingual contexts; and 2) teacher education. Sub-theme one raises questions about facets of multilingual learning and teaching and addresses e.g. biographical, discursive and contextual aspects. Sub-theme two focuses upon teaching competence and its development and asks how teacher beliefs, perceptions and attitudes influence learning to teach in and for multilingual contexts.S099 detailed programme, click here
In-service teachers, translanguaging pedagogies and the development of teacher cognition – voices from the field
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Annaliina Gynne, Senior Lecturer, Mälardalen University
The purpose of this paper is to investigate in-service teachers’ thoughts and beliefs vis-á-vis a professional development program focusing on pedagogical translanguaging. In this ethnographically framed study, the complex relationships between teacher cognition, teacher identities and their classroom practices during a professional development project will be examined.
Preparing Pre-service Teachers for Multilingual Learning—Findings from a Study on Competence Development for Multilingual Education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Denis Weger, University Of Vienna
This presentation focuses on pre-service teachers’ competence development for teaching in multilingual contexts by attending a corresponding teacher education course. Results of a study using the concept of professional vision—the ability to notice and reason about relevant classroom events—as indicator for professional competence are discussed.
Teachers’ experiences of assessing their multilingual students’ language abilities
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Elisabeth Nilsson, Umeå University
This interview study presents 13 preschool class teachers’ experiences of assessing the language abilities of six year olds who speak other languages than Swedish at home. The classroom assessments were valued as a starting point but the teachers felt the need to vary their methods when assessing multilingual students.
The Impact of Pre-Service Language Teachers‘ Plurilingual Identity on their Self-Efficacy
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Lena Schwarzl, University Of Vienna
Orly Haim, Pedagogical Advisor, Chair Of The Council Of The Faculty Of Education (Beit Berl College), Beit Berl College; Tel Aviv University, Israel
This exploratory cross-national study investigates how the perceived plurilingual identity of pre-service teachers affects their self-efficacy. Data sources included 40 language portraits and in-depth semi-structured interviews. Initial inductive content analysis revealed a number of predominant themes suggesting that pre-service teachers‘ plurilingual identity is closely intertwinded with their sense of self-efficacy.
Building multilingual identities in the context of parental engagement: insights for teacher education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Valéria Schörghofer-Queiroz, University Of Vienna
This presentation focusses on the teacher’s role in the construction of the multilingual identity of culturally and linguistically diverse parents in the context of their children’s school. Preliminary reflections based on qualitative data show the importance of teachers in facilitating parents’ possibilities of school involvement and empowering them as multilingual subjects.
Moving from representations on multilingualism to professional practices in teacher training : the field of French Guiana to nurture didactics
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Manon Plasschaert, Teacher, Education Nationale
Nathalie Blanc, Associate Professor / AFLA Vice President, Université Lyon 1
This communication reports on an empirical approach carried out in socially disadvantaged school districts in the department of French Guiana where most pupils are multilingual during teacher training sessions aimed to draw up an inventory of representations on multilingualism to develop them and to create levers to improve teaching practices
Teachers’ subjective viewpoints about multilingualism – a cross-national comparative research project
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Adrian Lundberg, Malmö University
Primary school teachers’ subjective perceptions of multilingualism on a conceptual level and potential pedagogical actions serving as language management actions in Sweden and Switzerland are investigated using a comparative Q methodological research approach.
Moving towards the multilingual paradigm in ELT: The MIOP model
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Anna Krulatz, NTNU
Maryann Christison, University Of Utah
ELT teachers find themselves working in increasingly multilingual classrooms. To challenge the monolingual bias and promote additive multilingualism, better tools for classroom observations are needed for teachers and supervisors. This presentation introduces the Multilingual Approach to Diversity in Education (MADE) as a tool for instructional design and assessment in multilingual ELT contexts.
Plurilingual TBLL: a way to enhance inclusion
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Gisela Mayr, Free University Of Bolzano
Thanks to plurilingual and multimodal inputs in plurilingual TBLL, the use of all languages present in the plurilingual repertoire of learners are activated during the taks-solving processes. They are involved in real-world discourse, which, triggers translanguaging practices and mediation and, by doing so, fosters inclusive attitudes and coopertive communicative practices.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S101 1/2 | Navigating Learner Autonomy in a Multicultural and Multilingual World — A Reflective Dialogical Approach
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Alice Chik, Macquarie University
Kerstin Dofs, PhD Student, Macquarie University/Ara Institute Of Canterbury
Kristin Hiller, Associate Director, Language And Culture Center; Assistant Professor, Duke Kunshan University
Yoshio Nakai, Osaka University
Ryo Moriya, Ph.D. Student, Waseda University
Vasiliki Celia Antoniou, Lecturer / Senior Teaching Fellow, University College London / University Of The West Of Scotland
Chrysogonus Siddha Malilang, Senior Lecturer, Malmö University
Larissa Dantas Rodrigues Borges, Federal University Of Pará, Brazil
Diego Mideros, Moderator, The University Of The West Indies
Vanessa Mota, PhD Student In Applied Linguistics, Federal University Of Rio De Janeiro
Ryoko De Burgh-Hirabe, Ara Institute Of Canterbury
Moderators
Maria Giovanna Tassinari, Free University Of Berlin
Jo Mynard, Kanda University Of International Studies
Amanda Bruscato - AILA Volunteer, University Of Groningen
Learner autonomy remains a widely spread but also highly debated approach to second language education in the 21st century. In short, it describes the idea that learners take control for their own learning by making informed decisions and critically reflecting on all aspects of their learning process. The aim of this symposium is twofold: to explore how the concept of learner autonomy as an educational approach has evolved in the wake of the 21st century and to look at how understandings and practical implementations of learner autonomy may be congruent or differ across educational, institutional, linguistic and cultural contexts. The idea for this symposium stems from a multi-country research project currently conducted by the conveners aiming to collect insights into different conceptual networks and practices of learner autonomy. After the keynote by Alice Chik (Macquarie University, Sidney, Australia), the symposium will give presenters the opportunity to share their narratives and research results and thus engage in a reflective dialogue on developing learner autonomy in multilingual and multicultural institutions. Ultimately, this will lead us to reflect on the role of English as a common language in conceptualising and implementing autonomous pedagogy as well as explore the common and distinctive features of our conceptual associations with autonomy in English and other languages.
Sidelining Learner autonomy in Australian Curriculum
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Alice Chik, Macquarie University
If learner autonomy is an essential concept for TESOL or FL educators, is it also important for English as an Additional Language or Dialect teaching? Can we find ‘learner autonomy’ in the Australian Curriculum? If yes, where? Findings from a curriculum and education policy review project will be discussed.
Consequences of awareness-building collaboration – Educators enabling autonomous teaching and learning
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Ryoko De Burgh-Hirabe, Ara Institute Of Canterbury
Kerstin Dofs, PhD Student, Macquarie University/Ara Institute Of Canterbury
Action research by language teachers at a New Zealand polytechnic aims at promoting collaborative autonomous language learning among students who learn Māori and those who learn Japanese language. This presentation will report preliminary findings focusing on the learners of Japanese who engaged in group projects using Web 2.0 technology (wikis).
Mediated development through the prism of concept map activity
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Vasiliki Celia Antoniou, Lecturer / Senior Teaching Fellow, University College London / University Of The West Of Scotland
The present paper proposes a framework for fostering dialogic interaction with learners intended to render concept map instructional materials as cognitive tools to regulate learner L2 use and understanding of academic concepts
Learner autonomy and engagement in computer-mediated and independent language learning contexts: A tale of two programs
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kristin Hiller, Associate Director, Language And Culture Center; Assistant Professor, Duke Kunshan University
This presentation compares efforts to promote learner autonomy and engagement in two contexts: Results are shared from a CALL curriculum revision project at a Korean university, and current efforts to develop an independent language learning program at a Sino–U.S. joint venture university in China are discussed.
Reflective dialogue fostering learner autonomy: a transformative change in learning Japanese as a second language
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yoshio Nakai, Osaka University
Masako Wakisaka, Kyushu University
Reflection is necessary for the language learner to promote language awareness and it is implemented by reflective dialogue which is an approach to confront the learner’s own experiences and beliefs. This presentation explores how reflective dialogue can affect learner autonomy by introducing two cases with different learning settings.
Exploring the unity of cognition and emotion in collaborative advisory sessions: A qualitatively-driven mixed-methods study
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Ryo Moriya, Ph.D. Student, Waseda University
Taking the inseparability of cognition and emotion (i.e., perezhivanie) into account, the study conducted classroom-based peer advising and explored advisees' perezhivanie through one semester. The participants were eight college students in Japan and reflected their cognitive-emotional processes. The findings focus on advisees' cognitive-emotional responses to their L2 learning through collaborative advising.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S109 | Perspectives on language(s) in education: A comparative overview
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Kutlay Yagmur, Tilburg University
Latisha Mary, University Of Strasbourg
BethAnne Paulsrud, Dalarna University
Andrea C. Schalley, Symposium Organiser/Moderator (S109 & S147); Presenter, Karlstad University
Päivi Juvonen, Presenter, Linnaeus University
Christina Hedman, Stockholm University
Natalia Ganuza, Uppsala University
Sophia Gasson, Stockholm University
Karin Van Der Worp, University Of The Basque Country
Joyce Kling, Associate Professor, University Of Copenhagen
Susana Eisenchlas, Symposium Organiser/Moderator (S109 & 147)/ Presenter (S147), Griffith University
Moderators
Andrea C. Schalley, Symposium Organiser/Moderator (S109 & S147); Presenter, Karlstad University
Susana Eisenchlas, Symposium Organiser/Moderator (S109 & 147)/ Presenter (S147), Griffith University
Niklas Abel, AILA 2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
This open symposium will discuss key educational perspectives and practices in relation to linguistic diversity across countries and communities. We are interested in how societal groups perceive, react to, and manage linguistic diversity, and how this is reflected in formal and informal educational programs and initiatives. The focus of this symposium lies on trans- and intranational comparisons, in an attempt to extend beyond the traditionally nationally oriented research on multilingualism in education, while acknowledging the different linguistic ecologies within nations as well. Accordingly, the symposium will adopt a two-fold approach: In the first presentation slot, we invite overviews of language(s) in the formal and informal education system from selected national contexts, as well as contributions drawing explicitly on comparisons across the national context. In the second presentation slot, specific key issues which impact on educational policies and practices will be discussed and compared both trans- and intra-nationally. These issues may include language attitudes and ideologies, the status of languages within societies, or aspects of social justice and inclusiveness.
European Union Policies do not mean equitable practice in the Member States: Management of Linguistic Diversity in Formal Education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kutlay Yagmur, Tilburg University
Linguistic diversity is a key feature of European Union but the management of linguistic diversity in member states does not always adhere to European Union legislation and principles. In line with the aims of this symposium (S109), I will discuss the differences between European Union policies and the national practices in various European countries.
“Sounds awful because it sounds like you don’t value their home language”: English and French teachers’ contradictory attitudes and practices
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Latisha Mary, University Of Strasbourg
Clare Cunningham, York St John University
Andrea Young, University Of Strasbourg
Teachers’ beliefs about the place of non-dominant languages in education impacts on whether children’s complete linguistic repertoires are welcomed or inhibited in school contexts. This talk will discuss the themes and contradictions which emerged from c.50 semi-structured teacher interviews in England and France about attitudes, knowledge and practices concerning multilingualism.
Tensions all around: Multilingualism and teacher training in Sweden
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
BethAnne Paulsrud, Dalarna University
Päivi Juvonen, Presenter, Linnaeus University
Andrea C. Schalley, Symposium Organiser/Moderator (S109 & S147); Presenter, Karlstad University
This interview study of Swedish teacher educators, in-service teachers, and pre-service teachers focuses on their attitudes and beliefs on multilingualism through a language orientation lens. The study reveals tensions among the participants and contributes to an understanding of the impact of teacher training on linguistic diversity management.
A call for an increased focus on language variation and Critical Language Awareness within Mother Tongue Instruction in Sweden
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Christina Hedman, Stockholm University
Natalia Ganuza, Uppsala University
The paper argues for the need to include an increased focus on language variation and Critical Language Awareness in Mother Tongue Instruction in Sweden, using an additive expansion-oriented pedagogy (Leeman 2018). Currently, these perspectives are largely lacking in MTI. The aim is to expand students’ linguistic repertoires beyond written standards.
English subject in Sweden’s primary language curriculum: discourses and ideological space in de jure policy.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sophia Gasson, Stockholm University
This paper investigates how the English subject syllabus at primary level is constructed in relation to other language subjects in the Swedish 2011 (revised 2018) curriculum. Discourse analysis of language syllabi using the concept of voices as linguistic manifestations of ideologies is presented and discussed vis-à-vis space for plurilingualism and plurilingual competence. 
Business students’ perceptions on the languages they study in the Basque Autonomous Community in relation to their future workplace
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Karin Van Der Worp, University Of The Basque Country
Co-authors :
Jasone Cenoz
Durk Gorter
This study analyzes Business Students’ perceptions on languages in the multilingual context of the Basque Autonomous Community. The study takes into account as a variable not only the L1 of the students, but their whole linguistic repertoire by defining them on different levels of multilingualism according to their language competences.
The evolution of English medium instruction research: A comparative overview
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Joyce Kling, Associate Professor, University Of Copenhagen
Slobodanka Dimova, University Of Copenhagen
Stable EMI research frameworks are needed to ensure that different areas in this multidimensional phenomenon are equally investigated (Dafouz & Smit, 2016). In order to develop such a research framework, we have examined the EMI research (1999-2018) at five European countries that are at different EMI implementation stages.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S128 1/2 | ReN: Broadening Perspectives: Theorising, Researching and Practising Literature in Language Teaching
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Wolfgang Hallet, Justus Liebig University Giessen
Esther Schat, Utrecht University
Gila Schauer, University Of Erfurt
Claudia Mustroph, LMU Munich
Kyoko Kuze, Toyo University
Stephan-Alexander Ditze, Teacher (English, Politics/Economics), Post-doc Researcher, University Of Bremen | Max-Planck-Gymnasium
Agustin Reyes-Torres, University Of Valencia
Emilia Luukka, Doctoral Researcher, Tampere University
Sandra Stadler-Heer, Symposium Organizer 128, ReN Coordinator, Catholic University Of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt
Sara Lis Ventura, University College Cork
Chantelle Warner, University Of Arizona
Moderators
Amos Paran, University College London Institute Of Education
Petra Kirchhoff, Erfurt University
Sandra Stadler-Heer, Symposium Organizer 128, ReN Coordinator, Catholic University Of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt
This symposium, organised by the Literature in Language Learning and Teaching (LiLLT) ReN convenors Sandra Stadler-Heer, Petra Kirchhoff and Amos Paran, with Wolfgang Hallet as featured speaker, focuses on the use of literature in language classrooms and on researching literature within applied linguistics. The longstanding and strong preoccupation with the practical problems of integrating literature in language curricula in secondary and tertiary education contexts has recently resulted in a revived interest in theorising and researching this area. For this symposium, we invite papers focusing on investigations of (new) patterns and paradigms, both theoretical and empirical. This includes the widening of the scope of literature to include a wide variety of multimodal texts as well as activities such as fanfiction, poetry writing and gaming, as well as widening the focus evolving from a reliance on what has variously been called "practitioner evidence" or "best practice literature" to employing a variety of educational and applied linguistics research methodologies to look at issues such as teacher and learner beliefs, the actual use of literature in classrooms, and curriculum and textbook research among others. The symposium will thus provide the floor for empirically informed discussions of theorising, researching and practicing literature in language teaching.S128 detailed programme, click here
Functions of Literature in Culture and Language Learning
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Wolfgang Hallet, Justus Liebig University Giessen
The ability to read literary texts and to explore fictional worlds is a competence in its own right. Teaching literature should be based on a model of literary competences that learners need to acquire in order to understand the aesthetic dimension of literary texts and their relation to cultural experiences.
Implementation of an intercultural literary pedagogy in FLT: an effect study in secondary education in the Netherlands
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Esther Schat, Utrecht University
Co-authors :
Rick De Graaff, Mentor ; Coordinator Of Symposium S084, Utrecht University | UAS Utrecht
Ewout Van Der Knaap
This study investigates the effects of a CLIL-based literary pedagogy on intercultural competence and language proficiency of 239 students in FLT. Three interventions carried out in two consecutive school years in the upper forms of Dutch secondary schools showed positive effects on intercultural competence development as measured by a validated questionnaire.
Picturebooks, pragmatics and teaching young L2 learners of English: an investigation of five children’s books
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Gila Schauer, University Of Erfurt
In this presentation, I will examine five different picturebooks (The airport book, The prince and the pee, The suitcase, Weirdo, When Charley met Emma) regarding their speech act content. I will focus on 15 speech acts acts (Advice, Advice Response, Apology, Agreement, Disagreement, Complaint, Expression of Feelings / Physical states, Greeting, Leave-take, Offer, Offer Response, Request, Request-Responses, Reprimand, Thanking) but will also briefly address issues such as exclusion and inclusion, talking about bodily functions and intercultural content.
Multimodal Literature in the EFL Classroom – Exploring German EFL Teachers’ Beliefs and Practices
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Claudia Mustroph, LMU Munich
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Teachers’ Beliefs about Using Literature and Film in ESP-oriented Classes
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kyoko Kuze, Toyo University
This presentation aims to focus on the teachers who use literature and/or film in their ESP-oriented courses and investigate why these teachers use them in the contexts and what issues are in their minds. The results of the teacher interviews indicated that the teachers believed in some benefits of using literature and film, even in their ESP-oriented classrooms. If we claim the value of literature and film in language teaching, we must seek their use in various contexts, including such as ESP-oriented courses and other unexpected contexts. 
Literature as catalyst for cross-curricular education – FICTION AND CONTENT UNIFIED LEARNING (FACUL)
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Stephan-Alexander Ditze, Teacher (English, Politics/Economics), Post-doc Researcher, University Of Bremen | Max-Planck-Gymnasium
The curricula-based school practice of the Sciences ignores the human aptitude for storytelling. FICTION AND CONTENT UNIFIED LEARNING (FACUL) employs neuroscientific insights into the conditions of successful learning and demonstrates how LabLit, a subgenre of science novels, can act as catalyst to trigger cross-curricular learning processes.
Picturebooks as the basis for the development of aesthetic education in EFL: From inferential online reading to emotional competence
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Agustin Reyes-Torres, University Of Valencia
This research focuses on the reading process in which children get engaged when working with picturebooks. We aim to analyze the inferential online reading that occurs while students interpret the meaning of the text and how this process triggers a series of aesthetic experiences that develop in turn emotional competences.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S134 1/2 | ReN: Fully Inclusive Practitioner Research Network Symposium: New epistemologies and cultural dynamics of co-production
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Emily Edwards, Lecturer In Academic Language And Learning, University Of Technology Sydney
Anne Burns, University Of New South Wales
Tim Ashwell, Teacher, Komazawa University
Andy Barfield, Chuo University
Alison Stewart, Gakushuin University
Judith Hanks, University Of Leeds
Sian Etherington, University Of Salford
Johanna Vaattovaara, Professor, Tampere University, Finland
Yoshitaka Kato, Chubu University
Sal Consoli, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Moderators
Assia Rolls, Researcher, Regent's University London
Cori Crane, Associate Professor, University Of Alabama
Ines Miller, Supervisor Teacher Education Courses, Pontifical Catholic University Of Rio De Janeiro
Judith Hanks, University Of Leeds
This new AILA Fully Inclusive Practitioner Research Network Symposium explores critical perspectives raised by co-production in research and pedagogy. Traditionally research has 'belonged' to researchers, while teaching/learning has 'belonged' to practitioners. This creates a cultural communication gap which has long been contested. We highlight the challenges of different contextual constraints, probe assumptions of agency, voice and ownership, and foreground issues of local/global knowledge raised when practitioners engage in theorising praxis. This approach deliberately crosses boundaries, asking WHO does WHAT in classrooms and research. Making practitioner research fully inclusive means empowering those whose contributions are traditionally overlooked: learners, teachers, teacher educators, administrators, to co-produce knowledge, share insights, develop understandings of research in applied linguistics. New epistemologies are generated as hierarchies are interrogated and the cultures of research and pedagogy are explored. In this interactive Symposium we bring together researchers, practitioner researchers, teachers, learners and scholars involved in fully inclusive practitioner research from different geographical, institutional, cultural areas. A rich variety of speakers (both experienced and 'new scholars') from around the world will give creative, multimodal presentations of their work. We invite discussions in a new approach to co-production of knowledge about learning, teaching, researching in applied linguistics.
Sustainability in practitioner research: Perspectives from Australia
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Anne Burns, University Of New South Wales
Emily Edwards, Lecturer In Academic Language And Learning, University Of Technology Sydney
We argue for the importance of sustainability in practitioner research, with reference to our experiences of facilitating and researching English language teacher action research in Australia. We draw on a sociocultural ecological theoretical framework to propose ways in which sustainability can be achieved in practitioner research.
Beyond the third-party academic paradigm in writing about inclusive practitioner research
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Tim Ashwell, Teacher, Komazawa University
Andy Barfield, Chuo University
Alison Stewart, Gakushuin University
The new online Learner Development Journal was initiated to create an accessible forum for engaging with and writing about inclusive practitioner research. Here, we problematise the brokering of alternative writing practices and discuss the difficulties for editors, reviewers, and contributors in breaking with a third-party" academic paradigm."
Secret doors, coffee cups and humour: Investigating EAP teachers’ positive emotions, well-being and quality of life through ‘sticky objects’
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sian Etherington, University Of Salford
Judith Hanks, University Of Leeds
This multi-modal, qualitative research investigated EAP teacher positive emotions in the higher education contexts of Saudi Arabia and the UK through teacher recordings of ‘sticky objects’ (Ahmed 2004), diary entries, and interview data. The findings illuminate positive emotional practices, notions of emotion labour and feeling rules within the two contexts.
Empowering professional identities through co-investigating in an interdisciplinary learning environment: a case example of from Finland
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Johanna Vaattovaara, Professor, Tampere University, Finland
This presentation will briefly present the highlights of the empirical interdisciplinary course case which was built on (some of) the basic principles of the fully inclusive Exploratory Practice. The learning environment was used as a means for exploring bottom-up sociolinguistic norms and sense-making as identified and relevant for the participants. The groups of students co-working for understanding consisted of MA students of Finnish language and students of Theatre Arts. Among the inclusive research methods was autoethnographic, reflective diary keeping applied together with project based collaborative activities.
Writer, editor and reviewer perspectives on writing about inclusive practitioner research
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Tim Ashwell, Teacher, Komazawa University
Alison Stewart, Gakushuin University
Andy Barfield, Chuo University
In this poster presentation we follow up on questions raised in the presentation “Beyond the third-party academic paradigm in writing about inclusive practitioner research” by exploring the perspectives of writers, reviewers and editors who have participated in a new online forum for engaging with and writing about inclusive practitioner research.
‘Why should puzzles be “why” questions?’ Puzzling about Exploratory Practice with language learners
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yoshitaka Kato, Chubu University
This study reports on a meta-puzzling process of Exploratory Practice (EP) focusing on puzzles. In this case study, undergraduate students explored their own puzzles framed with ‘Why’, ‘How’ and ‘What’ and they compared, in collaboration with their teacher, the three forms of puzzles in terms of their engagement in EP.
Practitioner researchers and academic researchers can do better together
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sal Consoli, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
The divide between practitioners and academics has been largely debated and critiqued. However, with this presentation, I wish to share my experience as an academic practitioner and illustrate the rationale for partnerships between applied linguistics academics and practitioners to work together and produce more powerful research insights.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S150 3/3 | ReN: on Early Language Learning
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Carmen Becker, TU Braunschweig
Maarit Mutta, University Of Turku
Outi Veivo, University Of Turku
Eva Wilden, University Of Duisburg-Essen
Sarah Sturm, Technical University Of Braunschweig
Gabriela Lüthi, University Of Fribourg
Teresa Kieseiser
Moderators
Heather Hilton, Convenor, Symposium 150 On Early Language Learning (AILA REN), Lumière University Lyon 2
Eva Wilden, University Of Duisburg-Essen
Siemone Zuidema (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer
The Early Language Learning Research Network has organized a Symposium at the past two AILA Congresses (Brisbane in 2014, Rio de Janiero in 2017), a sign of increasing scientific and political interest in language learning in the primary and preschool years. In such a context, a forum for the scientific consideration of the specificities of early language learning (ELL) is vital for teachers, materials designers and policy makers worldwide, and the objective of our AILA Symposia has always been to bring together speakers who can synthesize important work being carried out at regional and national levels, in order to inform policy and practice. The current ELL ReN has identified eight particularly important research strands, which provide the structure for our Symposium proposal: classroom practices for ELL, training teachers for ELL, ELL by multilingual and migrant learners, digital media for ELL, assessment in ELL, learning to read and write in ELL, "early years" instructed language learning (under the age of 6). The ReN strand coordinators have proposed featured speakers who will be presenting high-level studies on these themes, and the ELL Network invites similarly high-level papers to complete these perspectives.
Multilingualism in the early FL classroom: The role of heritage languages
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Carmen Becker, TU Braunschweig
We present findings on the efficacy of a multilingual teaching approach to early English as a foreign language (EFL) in German primary schools. We outline the model, we report on its implementation in 4 schools for 6 months, and we discuss its effects on FL achievement.
Robot-assisted L2 Learning in Primary School
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Outi Veivo, University Of Turku
Maarit Mutta, University Of Turku
Robot-assisted language learning offers interesting possibilities for early language learning. We analyze child-robot-interactions in L2 learning in primary school. Our results show that the majority of problems in these interactions are related to L2 pronunciation. These results highlight the importance of adjusting teaching materials in RALL for L2 child speakers.
Teachers' L1 and L2 use in primary L2 education and the role of teacher qualification and teachers' L2 proficiency
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Eva Wilden, University Of Duisburg-Essen
This study examined teachers' L1 (German) and L2 (English) use in German primary L2 classrooms. Findings indicate that a higher qualification of primary L2 teachers can be linked to higher L2 proficiency as well as more frequent L2 use in the classroom – and vice versa.
Vocabulary learning strategies in primary EFL contexts: The effect of multilingualism
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sarah Sturm, Technical University Of Braunschweig
In my PhD project I investigate the effect of multilingualism on primary school students’ vocabulary learning strategies. In controlled settings, 35 participants carried out vocabulary learning tasks and verbalized their thoughts. In this presentation, I will discuss which strategies participants used in these tasks and which factors predicted their strategy use.
Implementing multilingual approaches in primary school – teachers’ and teacher trainers’ views
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Gabriela Lüthi, University Of Fribourg
Co-authors :
Elisabeth Peyer, University Of Fribourg
Our poster presents findings of focus groups with primary school teachers and teacher trainers on the implementation of multilingual approaches in Swiss primary schools. Participants appraised multilingual activities regarding their curricular relevance and their potential to develop language competence on the basis of filmed sequences of pupils dealing with these activities.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S161 3/3 | Study abroad as a multilingual, intercultural and transnational experience
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Miroslaw Pawlak, Adam Mickiewicz University, Kalisz, Poland
Kata Csizér, Eotvos Lorand University
Yoko Munezane, Rikkyo University
Judith Borràs, University Of Lleida
Griet Boone, Ghent University
Zeynep Köylü, University Of Basel
Annarita Magliacane, Lecturer In TESOL And Applied Linguistics, University Of Liverpool
Ayako Suzuki, Tamagawa University
Midori Shikano, Nanzan University
Saule Petroniene, Kaunas University Of Technology
Moderators
Rosamond Mitchell, University Of Southampton
Kata Csizér, Eotvos Lorand University
Ana Beaven, University Of Bologna
June Eyckmans, Presenter, Ghent University
Nicole Tracy-Ventura, West Virginia University
Aline Oelen - AILA Volunteer, AILA2021 Volunteer
Study abroad is a complex educational experience, with potential to support academic, linguistic, personal and intercultural development. Traditionally, applied linguistics research has concentrated on SA as an opportunity for second language acquisition by instructed learners, with a focus on single languages (English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese etc). However in practice study abroad today takes place in multilingual and multicultural environments, and involves students from increasingly diverse transnational backgrounds. Much less is known about the likely impact of such complex experiences on student development (e.g. whether they experience multilingualism and/ or interculturality as a series of separate linguistic and cultural encounters, or as an integrated whole). This symposium therefore invites contributions from researchers interested in the impact of contemporary study abroad experiences on: students' evolving multilingualism including development in individual languages plus interactions between home languages, local languages, English as a lingua franca students' beliefs, language attitudes and multilingual identity students' intercultural and transnational orientation students' personal development in terms of agency, self-regulation and autonomy. As well as reporting their empirical research, contributors will be asked to reflect on their theoretical contribution to the understanding of SA, and/or to the educational support frameworks which can maximise students' development in contemporary SA settings.S161 detailed programme, click here
The role of self-regulation in study abroad settings: An overview
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Miroslaw Pawlak, Adam Mickiewicz University, Kalisz, Poland
The paper provides an overview of studies of self-regulation in SLA, with special emphasis on those investigating the role of self-regulatory capacity in study abroad contexts. The overview serves as a basis for considering future research directions and suggesting how empirical evidence can enhance the effectiveness of study abroad programs.
International students in Australia, their self-efficacy and self-regulatory strategy use: a transnational perspective
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Miroslaw Pawlak, Adam Mickiewicz University, Kalisz, Poland
This paper explores international students’ language learning experience in Australia and Europe. The same standardized questionnaire, designed initially for Study Abroad students at European universities, examines students’ educational experience. The first part discusses the Australian data and the second offers a unique comparative insight into student experience in transnational contexts.
The impact of motivation and self-efficacy on self-regulatory strategy use in study abroad contexts in Europe
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kata Csizér, Eotvos Lorand University
Co-authors :
Miroslaw Pawlak, Adam Mickiewicz University, Kalisz, Poland
We will present and discuss data collected with the help of a standardized questionnaire measuring university students’ self-regulatory strategy use, their motivated learning behavior and their self-efficacy beliefs in various study abroad contexts in Europe.
Predicting Sociocultural Adjustment of Sojourners Studying in Japan
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Yoko Munezane, Rikkyo University
This presentation explores the factors influencing the sociocultural adaptation of international students in Japan. The results of regression analysis indicated that cultural intelligence and language competence predicted sociocultural adaptation. Implications for the effective study-abroad experience will be discussed.
The role of learning context and individual differences when performing different study abroad experiences
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Judith Borràs, University Of Lleida
Co-authors :
Àngels Llanes, University Of Lleida
This study compares English (L2) development in two different study abroad (SA) contexts: traditional SA and English as a lingua franca study abroad. Results show that the two contexts are comparable regarding L2 reading, vocabulary and proficiency development, and that individual variables have a strong impact on students’ learning outcomes.
Development of formulaic language use in a multilingual study abroad context: how social interaction affects students’ production in L2 German
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Griet Boone, Ghent University
This qualitative study explores the learning trajectories of four language students (L2 German) during a semester abroad: two of them stayed in a German-speaking country, two in a non-German-speaking country. The effect of learners' social interaction on their L2 formulaic development will be discussed.
The Effects of Study Abroad on Oral L2 Development: Results from a Learner Corpus Study
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Zeynep Köylü, University Of Basel
This study investigated the effects of two study abroad contexts on L2 oral development through complexity, accuracy, and fluency measures depending on language orientation of the sojourn country. The results lead us question the necessity of Anglophone study abroad compared to the English as a lingua franca sojourn context.
Language contact during transnational student mobility: spaces and affordances during Covid-19
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Annarita Magliacane, Lecturer In TESOL And Applied Linguistics, University Of Liverpool
This contribution analyses the opportunities for language contact that students experienced during Covid 19 by focusing on the access to physical and socially constructed spaces. 
Impacts of study abroad on university students' understanding of English as a lingua franca
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Ayako Suzuki, Tamagawa University
This paper reports a case study that investigates whether study abroad can develop Japanese university students’ understanding of English as a lingua franca (ELF) based on data obtained before, during, and after SA. It discusses factors that prevented students from fully developing understanding of the diversity of English.
Impact of a CLIL Study-abroad Program on Japanese University Students: Integrating Quantitative and Qualitative Methods
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Midori Shikano, Nanzan University
Co-authors :
Midori Shikano, Nanzan University
Kazuki Kagohashi, Nanzan University
Brad Deacon, Nanzan University
This preliminary study attempted to understand what experience it was to participate in a CLIL study-abroad program for Japanese participants (N= 107), by investigating its impact (effect and influence) including: change in awareness/attitudes towards global citizenship, sustainability behaviors, English language progress and use, and students’ academic and career orientation.
Study Abroad: Extracurricular Language Learning
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Saule Petroniene, Kaunas University Of Technology
Saule Juzeleniene, Teacher, Principal Investigator Of The Translation And Linguistic Research Group, Kaunas University Of Technology
Key words: extracurricular language learning, extramural language learning, study abroad, foreign language learning
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S169 1/2 | Tensions between monolingualism and multilingualism across university contexts
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Marie Källkvist, Lund University
Maria Kuteeva, Symposium Organiser, Presenter, Stockholm University
Kumiko Murata, Waseda University
Claudine Brohy, Lecturer, University Of Fribourg
Kathrin Kaufhold, Associate Professor, Stockholm University
Wanyu Amy Ou, The Education University Of Hong Kong
Dragana Cvetanovic, University Of Helsinki
Anta Kursiša, University Of Stockholm
Lidia Balsà, Serra Hunter Lecturer, Rovira I Virgili University
Josep M. Cots, University Of Lleida
Agnes Bodis, Macquarie University
Anna Solin, University Of Helsinki
Guillaume Gentil, Carleton University
Irina Shchemeleva, Higher School Of Economics, University Of Helsinki
Jie Liu, University College London
Luke Holmes, Doctoral Student, Stockholm University
Monika Dannerer, University Of Innsbruck
Slobodanka Dimova, University Of Copenhagen
Taina Saarinen, University Of Jyväskylä
Tiina Onikki-Rantajääskö, University Of Helsinki
Heini Lehtonen, University Of Helsinki
Moderators
Kathrin Kaufhold, Associate Professor, Stockholm University
Maria Kuteeva, Symposium Organiser, Presenter, Stockholm University
Niina Hynninen, University Of Helsinki
Marita Everhardt (AILA2021 Volunteer), PhD Student, University Of Groningen / University Medical Center Groningen
At universities today, the national language(s) and English as an academic lingua franca are used alongside a plethora of other linguistic resources, including different languages, varieties, codes and registers. Our symposium explores universities as multilingual settings by drawing attention to various, often conflicting, language perceptions and practices alongside the prominence of English in international study programmes and research publication. Language practices are understood here as behaviour or activity in relation to specific language regimes. The symposium problematises language boundaries and dominant perceptions of standards and norms and seeks to provide empirical evidence for 'polycentric systems of norms' (Blommaert 2010) within the rather conservative field of higher education. Our scope includes language perceptions and ideologies linking to societal issues, policies on the institutional level, and implications for individuals' repertoires on the personal level. We invite papers addressing the following issues: 1) tensions concerning monolingualism versus multilingualism on the institutional level; 2) the dialectics between perceiving and experiencing "language(s)" versus "languaging", i.e. between languages as separable objects and translingual practices; 3) the specificity of language uses at universities from the perspectives of different stakeholders, e.g. students, teachers, researchers and administrators; 4) language-regulatory mechanisms and practices related to the production of mono/multilingualism. S169 (1/2)08:30 – 09:10: Marie Källkvist & Francis Hult09:10 – 09:25: Maria Kuteeva09:25 – 09:50: Kumiko Murata & Masakazu Iino09:50 – 10:00: Claudine Brohy, Iris Schaller-Schwaner & Andy Kirkpatrick10:00 – 10:30: Coffee (with online interaction)10:30 – 10:45: Kathrin Kaufhold10:45 – 11:10: Wanyu Amy Ou & Mingyue Michelle Gu11:10 – 11:35: Dragana Cvetanovic, Heini Lehtonen, Åsa Mickwitz & Auli Toom11:35 – 11:45: Anta Kursiša, Anne Huhtala & Marjo Vesalainen11:45 – 11:55: Lídia Gallego Balsà & Josep Cots11:55 – 12:00: Additional discussion time
Monolingual-Bilingual-Multilingual Tensions in Higher Education
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Marie Källkvist, Lund University
Co-authors :
Francis Hult, University Of Maryland
This study focuses on how space was negotiated for different languages in real time during language-policy negotiations at a Swedish university. Tensions are revealed between the need for monolingualism (Swedish), parallel-language use (Swedish and English) and multilingualism (Swedish, English and other languages). Languages were variously positioned as problem or resource.
If not English, then what? Unpacking language hierarchies at university
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Maria Kuteeva, Symposium Organiser, Presenter, Stockholm University
This presentation unveils tensions between academic monolingualism and multilingualism. By analysing policy documents and survey comments, I identify three dominant discourses: “epistemic monolingualism”, “(wishful) academic multilingualism”, and “deficient multilingualism”. Major European academic languages, particularly German and French, hold a high status but their reported use is more “wishful” than real.
The same university, different policies, differing perceptions and constraints among students from two different EMI contexts in Japan
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kumiko Murata, Waseda University
Co-authors :
Masakazu Iino, Waseda University
This presentation discusses how different policies on EMI result in differing educational practices and environments, which impact on students’ perceptions of the nature of the shared medium, English, and their beliefs in monolingual NES norms and constraints of them as well as their understanding and appreciation of multilingualism and diversity.
Multilingual Switzerland and Hong Kong: issues around the denial of Swiss German and Cantonese as languages for academic purposes
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Claudine Brohy, Lecturer, University Of Fribourg
Co-authors :
Iris Schaller-Schwaner, Lecturer, AILA 2021 Presenter & Co-presenter, University Of Fribourg, Department Of English & University Language Centre
Andy Kirkpatrick, Griffith University
In Switzerland and Hong Kong respectively, neither Swiss German nor Cantonese are considered to be academic languages. Drawing on two university sites, the University of Fribourg in Switzerland and the Hong Kong Education University, we shall argue that both should be taught as languages for academic purposes/as academic languages.
Transnational students’ language ideologies and practices across social spaces in multilingual university settings
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kathrin Kaufhold, Associate Professor, Stockholm University
The paper explores the lived experiences of multilingual students who migrated to Sweden, based on interviews and writing logs. The results show various languages can be valuable for learning, and previous academic knowledge, entangled with language use, affects the success in tertiary education irrespective of language code.
Translingual practices as spatial repertoire for teaching and learning in an EMI multilingual university
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Wanyu Amy Ou, The Education University Of Hong Kong
Co-authors :
Michelle Mingyue Gu, The Education University Of Hong Kong
By offering a case of translanguaging-based classroom interaction in a multilingual university in China, this study problematizes several discourses that prevail international university policies, including English monolingualism and the linguistic and individual-oriented bias of language.
Developing translanguaging pedagogies in bilingual Bachelor degrees (TvEx) at the University of Helsinki: a students’ and teachers’ perceptions
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Dragana Cvetanovic, University Of Helsinki
Heini Lehtonen, University Of Helsinki
This paper explores what kind of translanguaging pedagogies teachers and students in bilingual learning situations at the University of Helsinki would benefit from and how these could be implemented and supported in practice. We focus on qualitative and quantitative analysis of data gathered through classroom observations, questionnaires and interviews.
Multilingual vs. Multilingually Aware? Exploring language students’ views of their multilingualism
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Anta Kursiša, University Of Stockholm
This study investigates questions raised in our earlier study dealing with multilingual awareness of advanced university students of LOTEs. Using a semi-open questionnaire, we will examine how students define multilingualism, and what the relatively common lack of awareness of being multilingual might be caused by.
(De)Legitimising plurilingual teaching practices in an ESP course at university: a discourse analysis approach to teacher’s and students’ argumentative strategies
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Lidia Balsà, Serra Hunter Lecturer, Rovira I Virgili University
Josep M. Cots, University Of Lleida
This study presents a qualitative study on the argumentative strategies that both students and the teacher employ to justify, legitimise or contest the use of plurilingual teaching and learning practices during the implementation of a course in English for Specific Purposes (ESP).
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S178 | The proofreading and editing of L2 English writing
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Joan Turner, Emeritus Professor, Goldsmiths
Nigel Harwood, Sheffield University
Mayumi Fujioka, Osaka Prefecture University
Miho Yamashita, Ritsumeikan University
Nina Conrad, PhD Candidate, University Of Arizona
Fatimah Alghamdi, King Abdulaziz University
Moderators
Nigel Harwood, Sheffield University
As English becomes the lingua franca of the global academy for students writing coursework and dissertations/theses, and for lecturers writing for publication, there is a growing need for editing (or 'proofreading') of L2 students' and academics' English language texts to ensure these texts are fit for purpose. Recent work researching the editing of student writing (e.g., Harwood et al., 2009; Harwood, 2018, 2019; Turner, 2018) and of academics' writing for publication (e.g., Burrough-Boenisch, 2005; Li, 2012; Luo & Hyland, 2016, 2017) has studied editing from a number of perspectives, and this symposium seeks proposals which will extend this knowledge base. Themes to address include: What types of interventions do editors make to writers' texts? Why, how, and to what extent do different editors intervene consistently? What are the ethical implications of editing for journal editors receiving academics' modified texts and for lecturers marking students' edited coursework/theses? To what extent do editors' practices align with writers' expectations? This symposium will bring papers on these and other topics together to provide delegates with an understanding of the various methods and methodologies which are being deployed to better understand the editing phenomenon and its implications for writers and policymakers in various higher education contexts.
Proofreading in the international university: ethical concerns, practical problems, symbolic meaning.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Joan Turner, Emeritus Professor, Goldsmiths
This presentation considers the multi-faceted issues, practical and ethical that arise with the proliferation of expectations of proofreading and its role as a mediating practice in student writing for assessment. It also looks at the links between the demand for proofreading and the role of English in transnational higher education.
The perspectives of lecturers, language tutors, and student writers on the proofreading of student writing
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Nigel Harwood, Sheffield University
I report on questionnaire and interview-based research soliciting the views of three parties on proofreading: (i) UK university lecturers; (ii) English language tutors; and (ii) undergraduate and postgraduate students. There are highly differing views of the ethical appropriacy of different forms of proofreading both within and across the three groups.
A US writing center tutor’s interventions in an L2 doctoral student’s dissertation writing
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Mayumi Fujioka, Osaka Prefecture University
This study reports a US writing center tutor’s interventions in an L2 doctoral student’s dissertation. Analysis of tutoring transcripts, interviews, and documents revealed the tutor’s systematic practice of constructing the tutee’s drafts through oral dictation. Findings suggest a need for discussion of ethical and effective L2 tutoring.
What expertise and instruction strategies are expected to from writing center tutors in the science department in university?
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Miho Yamashita, Ritsumeikan University
This paper reports effective tutoring and writing center instruction for science students in Japan. The results of analysis show tutors are expected to possess expertise in science research as well as familiarization of Japanese/English academic papers. They also need to build a collaborative relationship with tutees in writing science papers.
Quantifying academic proofreading: Further evidence for the ideological underpinnings of postsecondary students’ proofreading practices
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Nina Conrad, PhD Candidate, University Of Arizona
A mixed methods study revealed that a diverse student population pursued English-language proofreading services to improve their writing and academic marks. The types of interventions reported suggest that students’ pursuit of third-party proofreading may reflect an ideologically based fear of being positioned as deficient writers because of minor lexicogrammatical errors.
‘Accept and Move to Next’: Native-Speaking Editors’ Changes to English Academic Writing of Advance Non-Native Emerging Scholars
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Fatimah Alghamdi, King Abdulaziz University
Native-speaking editors’ changes to a corpus of about 22000 words of English academic writing by Saudi emerging scholars were analyzed. More than one third of the revisions made were found to be restating grammatically correct sentences. Meaning enhancement and meaning modification were the most recurring reasons for editors’ amendments
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S184 1/2 | Tools, Techniques and Strategies for Reflective Second & Foreign Language Teacher Education
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Sonja Brunsmeier, University Of Vechta
Anelise Gondar, UERJ
Karim Sadeghi, AILA Solidarity Awardee, Urmia University
Rodrigo Arellano, PhD Candidate - Lecturer, The University Of New South Wales
Fumiko Kurihara, Chuo University
Nancy Drescher, Faculty, Minnesota State University, Mankato
Paul Voerkel, Symposium Organizer, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Sabine Rotberg, Goethe-Institut
Stefania Kordia, Hellenic Open University
Sakiko Yoneda, Tamagawa University
Eri Osada, Kokugakuin University
Takane Yamaguchi, Shumei University
Moderators
Mergenfel A. Ferreira, UFRJ
Paul Voerkel, Symposium Organizer, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Michelle Mattuzzi (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer
The broad reception of Hattie's meta-studies about the impact of teacher activities has shown the core importance of teacher training and professional development. Within this area, "Reflection" and "Action Research" are increasingly considered as fundamental aspects for teacher education, for what questions raised by scholars such as Shulman (1986), Schön (1988) and Altrichter & Posch (2007) remain essential until today, in order to link the theoretical discussion about academic teacher training and the practical skills needed for classroom management and interaction. Numerous educational challenges, among them the emergence and overlapping of diverse technologies, make it crucial that teachers develop skills that help them rethink their practices. This "reflective moments" are supposed necessary to ensure the constant quality of their work and to encourage efficient practices of classroom interaction and language teaching. The symposium offers a space to bring together both theoretical studies and practical experiences of foreign or second language teacher education and professional development that focus on the issues pointed above. The discussions are meant to be open for scholars that deal with the teaching of foreign languages (especially "German as a Foreign Language") and aim to integrate participants from different regions of the world sharing their experiences.
Teachers as Researchers – A profession- and research-led teaching concept
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Sonja Brunsmeier, University Of Vechta
The quality of a teacher influences the quality of learning and teaching. The question about how academic settings should be best structured to allow for the development of well-qualified teachers arises. An explorative and qualitative approach is chosen to provide insights into concepts for teacher education at university level.
Ensuring pedagogical consistency between primary- and secondary-level foreign language education through portfolios in Japan
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Fumiko Kurihara, Chuo University
Eri Osada, Kokugakuin University
Sakiko Yoneda, Tamagawa University
Takane Yamaguchi, Shumei University
Rie Adachi, Researcher And Teacher, ​Sugiyama Jogakuen University
Co-authors :
Ken Hisamura, Den-en Chofu University
Hisatake Jimbo, Waseda University
This study examines the potential value of the two portfolios for EFL teachers in Japan. The portfolios are based on the rationale of the CEFR. We argue that they can serve as effective tools for reflective teaching and help maintain pedagogical consistency between primary to secondary-level EFL education.
A corpus-based analysis of ideologies in EFL teacher education policies
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Rodrigo Arellano, PhD Candidate - Lecturer, The University Of New South Wales
This mixed-method project aimed at reviewing EFL teacher training policies through the analysis of 3 corpora using keywords-in-context through Nvivo12. Results suggest discrepancies in the emphases given to different areas in the curriculum while showing evidence of neoliberal ideologies through the use of strategies from the ‘discourse of advertising’.
Teacher Education and Professional Self-Definition of Prospective Teachers of German as an Additional Language in Rio de Janeiro
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Anelise Gondar, UERJ
The purpose of this presentation is to report the results of a research that aimed to identify and analyze bottlenecks and potentialities of the university education of additional language teachers by looking into curricular subjects and activities comprising professional practice training.
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Room 1
S189 | Variables affecting foreign language acquisition in bilingual programs
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Thorsten Piske, Full Professor, University Of Erlangen-Nuremberg
Kristin Kersten, Full Prof. Of SLA & ELT, University Of Hildesheim
Ann-Christin Bruhn, University Of Hildesheim
Mengying Liu, University Of Minnesota
Patricia Uhl, Friedrich-Alexander University Of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany
Anja Steinlen, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
Anna Trebits, Lecturer In TESOL And Applied Linguistics, University Of Hildesheim
Katharina Ponto, University Of Hildesheim
Moderators
Anja Steinlen, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
Kristin Kersten, Full Prof. Of SLA & ELT, University Of Hildesheim
Saskia Nijmeijer, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Medical Center Groningen
A long-standing tradition in SLA investigates the effects of learner-internal and -external factors on language learning, often looking at variables in isolation. Recently, researchers have focused increasingly on the interplay of such factors in the dynamic contexts in which (language) development unfolds. L2A in educational programs adds to the complexity of such developmental trajectories. Instructional quality and L2 program features interact with the child's individual characteristics, which are shaped by their social and language background(s), leading to heterogeneous classrooms which have increasingly been in the focus of modern teaching approaches. Research on immersion programs (particularly in Canada and the U.S.) has consistently shown that the strongest predictors for L2A comprise intensity, duration and quality of L2 exposure, while less intensive bilingual programs, often referred to as CLIL in Europe, which cover various programs differing in intensity, duration, setup, and L2-input, have yielded mixed results. Clear distinctions of program variables and terminology are a desideratum for future studies. Statistical methods modeling multifactorial growth processes present a promising approach to shed light on the interplay of numerous factors in instructed L2A. This symposium invites theoretical and empirical papers on the impact and interplay of variables affecting L2 acquisition in bilingual classroom contexts.8.30-9.10 Thorsten Piske (key) 9.10-9.30 Patricia Uhl 9.30-9.50 Anja Steinlen9.50-10.00 Discussion10.30-10.50 Mengying Liu10.50-11.10 Kristin Kersten11.10-11.30 Ann-Christin Bruhn, Katharina Ponto, Kristin Kersten11.30-11.50 Anna Trebits, Katharina Ponto, Kristin Kersten11.50-12.00 Discussion
Factors affecting L2 learning in immersion, CLIL and ‘regular’ foreign language programs
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Thorsten Piske, Full Professor, University Of Erlangen-Nuremberg
This paper explores the role of several factors that have been claimed to affect L2 learning in classroom contexts by comparing the results of studies examining the linguistic outcomes of ‘regular’ foreign language programs and bilingual programs differing, among other things, in amount of learner exposure to the L2.
Competence acquisition of heterogeneous learner groups in a Bilingual Program (French/German) in Bavarian Primary Schools – First empirical results
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Patricia Uhl, Friedrich-Alexander University Of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany
Co-authors :
Thorsten Piske, Full Professor, University Of Erlangen-Nuremberg
The presented empirical study focuses on 127 first graders taking part in the new Bilingual Program (French/German) in Primary Schools in Bavaria. The research interest lies on the level of competence in French, German and mathematics as well as on the intersectionality axes gender, multilingualism and socioeconomic background.
Children with AD(H)D in primary school immersion programs
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Anja Steinlen, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
Co-authors :
Thorsten Piske, Full Professor, University Of Erlangen-Nuremberg
This study examined the linguistic achievements of children with and without AD(H)D who attended German-English immersion and mainstream programs in German primary schools. Although the AD(H)D children’s performance was affected by their cognitive deficits, intensive exposure to the target language positively affected their L2 development.
Second-grade Chinese immersion students’ language use
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Mengying Liu, University Of Minnesota
This case study explores patterns of L1 and L2 use by second graders attending a Chinese immersion program in the U.S. as they carry out classroom tasks with different interlocutors. Findings suggested that students use Chinese almost exclusively with teacher, and become English-dominant with peers on academic and non-academic topics.
The interplay of cognitive, social and instructional variables affecting foreign language acquisition in primary school: The Proximity Hypothesis
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Kristin Kersten, Full Prof. Of SLA & ELT, University Of Hildesheim
Research on differential effects of cognitive, social and instructional factors often confounds hierarchical relationships within 'container variables'. The Proximity Hypothesis posits that effects of distal factors are mediated and explained by proximal factors interacting directly with learners. This is investigated longitudinally in regular and bilingual primary schools using multilevel modeling. (Preprint on Researchgate)
L2 Instruction Predicts Young Learners' L2 Comprehension in Bilingual and Conventional Programs
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Ann-Christin Bruhn, University Of Hildesheim
Katharina Ponto, University Of Hildesheim
Kristin Kersten, Full Prof. Of SLA & ELT, University Of Hildesheim
This study focuses on the question which teaching techniques as operationalized by the Teacher Input Observation Scheme (TIOS) (Kersten et al., 2018) most strongly predict L2 lexical and grammar comprehension of young L2 learners of English from regular and bilingual primary schools in Germany. Correlational and multiple regression analyses suggest that immersion teachers outperform EFL teachers in their use of TIOS techniques, TIOS scores predict learners' L2 lexical and grammar comprehension (44.2% and 60.3% of variance), and that scales and item-based teacher behavior differentially affect L2 comprehension.
Sources of individual differences in L2 development: The role of parenting style, home enrichment and L1 proficiency in young learners
08:30AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Anna Trebits, Lecturer In TESOL And Applied Linguistics, University Of Hildesheim
Kristin Kersten, Full Prof. Of SLA & ELT, University Of Hildesheim
Katharina Ponto, University Of Hildesheim
Our research investigates how parenting style, home enrichment, and L1 proficiency impact primary school students’ L2 development in EFL and immersion contexts. Our results showed that bilingual (immersion) educational programs may potentially reduce the impact of parenting style and home enrichment on L2 development.
12:00 Noon - 01:30PM
LUNCH
12:15PM - 01:00PM
Body-Mind-Recharge in Gather.Town | Activity Center
During all lunch times in between symposia, we can revitalize with Iryna, an international and multilingual yoga teacher with over 10 years of experience. She will guide the 45 minutes yoga & stretching break to help you recharge and rebuild your mental and physical resources. Every session, she will start with breathing practice for a better focus, continue with yoga postures for shoulders, chest and lower back and finish with grounding meditation. This session is suitable and accessible for all levels and all you need is comfortable clothes for stretching, a mat, a towel or a chair to sit on.Go to Gathertown!
12:15PM - 01:15PM
Cooking together in Gather.Town | Activity Center | Kitchens
Do you have a (traditional) dish or drink which you would like to prepare live for and with other AILA delegates? During lunch and dinner times we have arranged some time slots, when others can join you in the virtual kitchen. We hope to have dishes/drinks from different parts of our AILA world! Do you want to host such a cooking session? Please sign up here and let us know what dish you wish to make.Go to Gathertown!
12:15PM - 01:15PM
Meet the Publisher @ Gather Town Classroom
A representative from each of our publishers will introduce themselves briefly and then answer your questions. Such as:What kinds of books do you publish?What are some of your key new titles?What are your distinguishing features as a book publisher?What sorts of books are you looking to commission?How would one submit a book proposal to you?What are you looking for in a stand-out proposal?Go to Gathertown!
01:30PM - 02:30PM
Room 1
Keynote Qiufang Wen
Format : Plenary
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Audrey Rousse-Malpat, Chair Of Social Program, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Qiufang Wen
Moderators
Audrey Rousse-Malpat, Chair Of Social Program, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
May Wu (AILA2021 Team)
Qiufang Wen (Beijing Foreign Studies University, China)Qiufang Wen is regarded as the leading figure in AL in China. She is currently Vice-President of the China Association for Comparative Studies of English and Chinese and Vice-president of AsiaTEFL. Her research interests include second language acquisition, teacher professional development, and national language capacity. 
Introduction by Audrey Rousse-Malpat
01:30PM - 02:30PM
Presented by :
Audrey Rousse-Malpat, Chair Of Social Program, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Audrey Rousse-Malpat will introduce the keynote presentation of Qiufang Wen
The production-oriented approach to the instructed second language acquisition: What has happened in the post-method era?
01:30PM - 02:30PM
Presented by :
Qiufang Wen
The production-oriented approach (POA) has been developed for over 10 years through several rounds of experimental teaching to optimize the implementation of the POA and improve its theoretical system.  It aims at overcoming the weaknesses (e.g. separation of input from output) in current English instruction in China and improving the efficiency of classroom instruction.  The POA, as an innovative pedagogy, starts instruction with production and ends with production while input serves as an enabler to help accomplish productive activities.  The theoretical system of the POA consists of three components: (a) teaching principles; (b) teaching hypotheses; and (c) teacher-guided teaching processes.  The teaching principles include "learning-centered", "Input-output integration" and "whole-person education".  The teaching hypotheses include "output-driven", "input-enabled", "selective learning" and "teacher-student collaborative assessment".   The teaching processes contain three phases (i.e. motivating, enabling, and assessing), each guided by the teacher.   The research findings showed that the POA is feasible and effective not only for English instruction but also for teaching Chinese as a foreign language.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Workshop: Methods and Tools for Coding Multimodal and Gesture Data Within Different Theoretical Frameworks
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Gale Stam, Professor Emerita, National Louis University
Johannes Wagner, University Of Southern Denmark
Marianne Gullberg, Lund University
Søren Wind Eskildsen, University Of Southern Denmark
Moderators
Johannes Wagner, University Of Southern Denmark
Gale Stam, Texas Tech University
Marianne Gullberg, Lund University
Søren Wind Eskildsen, University Of Southern Denmark
This workshop provides an overview of how to code videotaped data from different theoretical perspectives using various software programs. The first hour consists of presentations by experienced gesture and multimodal researchers Søren Wind Eskildsen, Marianne Gullberg, Gale Stam, and Johannes Wagner. The remainder of the workshop is a hands-on session where participants work on coding data and receive immediate feedback. The workshop is limited to 50 participants because of its hand-on nature. Participants with be sent information about material that they should download before the workshop.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S002 | “Who do you love more… L1 or Lx?” Potentials and limitations of approaches to assess multilingual attitudes from interdisciplinary and multi-methodological perspectives
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Julia Kawamoto, Presenter, Ehime University
Takako Inada, Japan University Of Health Sciences
Ivy Chen, University Of Melbourne
Mila Schwartz, Head Of The Research Authority , Oranim Academic College Of Education
Arwa AL Thobaiti, Phd Student, UNSW Sydney
Suzanne Dekker (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer, NHL Stenden UAS | University Of Groningen
Moderators
Rasmus Steinkrauss, AILA 2021 Committee - Treasurer, University Of Groningen
Marjolijn Verspoor, Chair AILA Organizing Committee And Mentor, University Of Groningen
Siemone Zuidema (AILA2021 Volunteer), AILA2021 Volunteer
Multilinguals' attitudes have a long pedigree in research, as a predictor of or indicator for linguistic integration or in studies on language maintenance and attrition (Schmid 2010). At the same time, the issue remains: How can we capture subjective concepts such as attitudes through objective methods? Further methodological issues arise from the conceptualization of language attitudes as static, internal, personal traits (e.g. developed prior to migration) and as affecting individuals' language development. This perception of one language equals one person or one community is not viable in the complexity of today's multilingual societies as criticized in "methodological nationalism" (Pavlenko/Blackledge 2004; Wimmer/Glick Schiller). Researchers who study language beliefs criticize this methodological approach and argue that attitudes are not the reason for, but rather the result of societal language practices (Roth et al. 2018). These methodological issues are crucial for further research on multilingualism and questions such as: How do we conceptualize and operationalize attitudes? What tools do we use to assess and evaluate them? The symposium invites researchers to share their on-going projects and to discuss in sub-themes whether and if so, what are the differences with regard to: - Disciplinary perspectives - Children and adults - Attitudes of or attitudes towards multilinguals.SCHEDULEAfter a short opening at 2:30, we will watch the recordings according to the following schedule. There is time for discussion after each presentation, and at the end.2:40-3:00 Julia Kawamoto: University teachers and students interviews on the use of L1 in the L2 classroom3:10-3:35 Takako Inada: What can a teacher's language choice (exclusive English use or translanguaging) affect among EFL university students in task-based communicative classes?3:45-4:15 Arwa AL Thobaiti: Understanding Language Attitudes toward Multilingualism among Undergraduates in Saudi Arabia through a Bifocal Research Lens4:25-4:50 Ivy Chen: Interaction between attitude and context in the prediction of language proficiency in multilinguals: The case of Taiwan
University teachers and students interviews on the use of L1 in the L2 classroom
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Julia Kawamoto, Presenter, Ehime University
This study explores two questions, which is first on the teacher issue: If teachers are using L1, then why are they using it and how much do teachers use it in their lessons? The second is the student issue: How do students feel about the use of the L1?
What can a teacher’s language choice (exclusive English use or translanguaging) affect among EFL university students in task-based communicative classes?
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Takako Inada, Japan University Of Health Sciences
This study investigates whether a teacher's language choice (English-only or translanguaging) can affect students' enjoyment, anxiety and English proficiency improvement. English-only instruction might contribute to increased enjoyment on students, while translanguaging instruction might contribute to the English proficiency improvement of basic to low intermediate-level students. 
Understanding Language Attitudes toward Multilingualism among Undergraduates in Saudi Arabia through a Bifocal Research Lens
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Arwa AL Thobaiti, Phd Student, UNSW Sydney
Multilingualism has become inevitable in the present interconnected world. Understanding whether it is being accepted or just tolerated is an important issue for cutting-edge sociolinguistic research. This Saudi-based study utilizes a bifocal lens to examine undergraduate students’ attitudes towards multilingualism. Findings showed receptive attitudes and willingness to become multilingual.
Interaction between attitude and context in the prediction of language proficiency in multilinguals: The case of Taiwan.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ivy Chen, University Of Melbourne
This study extends past research comparing languages occurring in the same society to multiple languages differing in status. Multilevel path analysis revealed an interaction between attitude and context in predicting proficiency. How much a language 'belongs' to the society or is 'useful' affects the effect of general attitude on reported proficiency levels. Other variables that significantly predicted proficiency were belief about others' proficiency and desire to learn the language.
Multilingual heritage speakers of Russian in the U.S., Israel, Germany and Finland talking about their linguistic attitudes
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Mila Schwartz, Head Of The Research Authority , Oranim Academic College Of Education
Multilingual adolescents in the U.S., Israel, Germany or Finland to immigrant families; they went through their childhood in the twofold surroundings of clashing values. Their educational experiences were colored through needs of conformity and acculturation. They spoke about their attitudes toward the languages and were tested in their L1 Russian.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S006 | Advances and challenges in spoken and multimodal learner corpus research and application
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Katrin Wisniewski, Justus Liebig University Giessen
Dana Gablasova, Lancaster University
John Osborne, University Savoie Mont Blanc
Kazunari Shimada, Senior Specialist For Textbooks, Ministry Of Education, Culture, Sports, Science And Technology - Japan
Raffaella Bottini, Lancaster University
Nivja De Jong, Leiden University
Moderators
Katrin Wisniewski, Justus Liebig University Giessen
Anke Lüdeling, Humboldt University Of Berlin
Audrey Rousse-Malpat, Chair Of Social Program, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Merel Keijzer, AILA Organizational Committee Member And Symposium Organizer, University Of Groningen
As the compilation of spoken learner corpora (SLC) is time-consuming and poses many methodological challenges, the number and diversity of SLC is not sufficient to permit a good understanding of L2 acquisition and L2 usage in both authentic communication and educational contexts. Therefore, our symposium addresses challenges and recent developments in SLC research. We especially invite contributions based on speech corpora (audio level included) or multimodal corpora (visual level included, and/or containing both written and spoken language) addressing, but not limited to the following issues: - methodological challenges in compiling and designing spoken/multimodal learner corpora (e.g., transcription, annotation, task design) - SLC study quality, e.g., transparency, reliability, replicability, generalizability - a broad range of linguistic phenomena (e.g., fluency, phonetics/phonology, discourse …) - relationships of spoken to written L2, or input-output-relationships, - the relationship of spoken L2 to the CEFR (proficiency classifications) or to educational success - mixed-methods, triangulated studies - applications of spoken/multimodal learner corpora in language assessment and in the L2 classroom We particularly welcome contributions based on target groups other than university students, languages other than English.Programme:14.30-15.10: Welcome by symposium organizersDana Gablasova: Interpreting patterns in corpora of L2 speech: The challenges of finding a meaningful L1 reference point15.10-15:40: John Osborne & Evgenia Nicol-Bakaldina, Spoken learner corpora: diversity and comparability16.00-16.30: Coffee break16.30-17:00: Kazunari Shimada, The Use of Discourse Markers in Japanese EFL Textbooks and Learner Speech: Variation in Discourse Types17:00-17:30: Raffaella Bottini, Lexical complexity and spoken L2 English proficiency in the Trinity Lancaster Corpus17:30-18:00: Nivja de Jong, Measuring speaking fluency automatically for the purpose of research and assessment
Interpreting patterns in corpora of L2 speech: The challenges of finding a meaningful L1 reference point
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Dana Gablasova, Lancaster University
Co-authors :
Vaclav Brezina, Lancaster University
This paper addresses methodological and conceptual issues related to one of the most commonly used research designs in corpus-based studies on L2 use: the comparison of corpora representing L1 and L2 speakers. It draws on the data from two new large corpora representing spoken English interactive L2 and L1 production.
Spoken learner corpora : diversity and comparability.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
John Osborne, University Savoie Mont Blanc
Co-authors :
Evgenia Nicol-Bakaldina, University Savoie Mont Blanc
This presentation discusses the methodological issues involved in finding a satisfactory compromise between common conventions of transcription and annotation in spoken learner corpora and the specific requirements of compiling corpora in different settings – primary, secondary and higher education - different languages and different modes of production.
The Effects of Explicit and Implicit Instruction on the Use of Discourse Markers in Japanese EFL Learners’ Speech
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Kazunari Shimada, Senior Specialist For Textbooks, Ministry Of Education, Culture, Sports, Science And Technology - Japan
This study investigated the effects of explicit and implicit discourse marker instruction on Japanese EFL learners' speech. The results of the data analysis suggest that the variety of discourse markers used by learners may be increased after explicit feedback, although the instruction has a limited effect.
Lexical complexity and spoken L2 English proficiency in the Trinity Lancaster Corpus
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Raffaella Bottini, Lancaster University
This study investigates lexical complexity in L2 spoken English at different CEFR levels of proficiency, examining the interaction with learners' L1 and age. The dataset is the Trinity Lancaster Corpus, a 4.3-million-word corpus of spoken L2 English based on exams administered by Trinity College London. Implications for language assessment and further research will be discussed.
Measuring speaking fluency automatically for the purpose of research and assessment
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Nivja De Jong, Leiden University
Fluency in terms of speed of speech and (lack of) hesitations such as silent and filled pauses ('uhm's) is part of oral proficiency. Language assessment rubrics therefore include fluency but manually measuring fluency is highly time-consuming. We introduce revised and new PRAAT scripts to automatically measure aspects of L2 fluency, and assess their accuracy and use for language assessment. We conclude that the current script should not (yet) be used for the purpose of assessing fluency automatically in (high-stakes) oral proficiency assessment. However, the performance of the scripts for measuring aspects of fluency globally and quickly are promising.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S008 2/3 | AILA-Europe Junior Research Meeting in Applied Linguistics
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Tanja Seppälä, Doctoral Researcher (PhD Student), University Of Jyväskylä
Eva Malessa, Junior Researcher, University Of Jyväskylä
Leila Imppola, University Of Jyväskylä
Veronika Hamann, PhD-Student, University Of Agder
Nuhi Bllaca, University Of Vienna
Moderators
Aleksandra Gnach, ZHAW Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Junping Hou, AILA2020 Committee Member, Xi'an University; University Of Groningen
Valery Wyss, ZHAW Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Janine Strandberg, PhD Candidate, University Of Groningen
Ting Huang AILA Volunteer, AILA2021 Volunteer, Fudan University
In January 2007, the first AILA Europe Junior Researchers Meeting (JMR) took place at the University of Groningen. Since then, the JRM has been held in various European countries, amongst them Ireland, Finland, Germany, and Switzerland and at this symposium we would like to integrate the JRM into the larger AILA conference. The aim of JRMs is to promote young researchers in Applied Linguistics from all over Europe by providing a platform in which they can present and discuss their research findings, ongoing studies and projects in an interactive and informal international environment. Junior Researchers include those working on their Master's and PhD theses, as well as those who have graduated within the last three years. In this symposium (two slots), we would like for junior researchers to present their papers on any topic within applied linguistics, but preferably on the conference theme "The dynamics of language, communication and culture in a changing world". Presenters will be asked about the kind of feedback or help they need and the organizers will invite designated senior researchers as commentators to foster questions and discussion.
Finnish language learning in Integration Training for Adult Immigrants in Finland: part-of-the-training participants
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Tanja Seppälä, Doctoral Researcher (PhD Student), University Of Jyväskylä
This study investigates adult migrants participating in only a part of Integration Training and these participants' Finnish language proficiency at the end of the training. Also, participants' interviews about learning Finnish are analysed. The training, that contains mostly language studies, is criticised for language learning results that are considered to be weak. The aim of this research is to display participants' heterogenous situations in the flexible training program and how part-of-the-training participation affects the language learning results.
Exploring game-based late L2 literacy training of adult migrants with limited educational backgrounds: Technology-enhanced or technology-exhausted learning?
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Eva Malessa, Junior Researcher, University Of Jyväskylä
Gamified digital support for initial literacy skill development of adult migrants with limited L1 literacy. The COVID-19 pandemic turned an efficacy field-testing study with adult literacy learners into an online-based exchange of experiences and ideas with their literacy teachers testing the app instead.
Importance of the Finnish language for second and third generation migrants from the perspective of German-Finnish youth in Germany
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Leila Imppola, University Of Jyväskylä
This paper investigates beliefs of German-Finnish adolescents about Finland and Finnish language in the context of the Finnish Language School. The Results indicated that all participants in the study highlighted the role of the Finnish Language School as a community that expanded the opportunities of using Finnish in everyday life.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S010 2/2 | Applied linguistics in the professions: The value of transdisciplinarity in a changing world
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Marlies Whitehouse, AILA Treasurer, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Christopher McKenna, Associate Professor, Business Communication And Legal Studies, Stephen F. Austin State University
Marina Bondi, University Of Modena And Reggio Emilia
Frédérick Dionne, University Of Klagenfurt
Eva-Maria Graf, University Of Klagenfurt
Eun-Young Kim, Andrews University
Moderators
Marlies Whitehouse, AILA Treasurer, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
Lilly Göthe - AILA Volunteer, Volunteer, University Of Groningen
The relation and collaboration between researchers and practitioners has long been discussed within and across applied sciences and theoretical disciplines (see AILA Review 2018, 31, for a recent overview). However, research approaches claiming to combine theoretical and practical needs and expectations often lack either solid grounding in empirical data or thorough reflection from theoretical perspectives. This symposium aims to take the discussion further by rethinking transdisciplinarity systematically from theoretical and practical angles, inviting contributions both from cooperation with other disciplines as well as with practitioners. From theoretical angles, the contributions explain how and why transdisciplinary research contributes to further developing empirically grounded theories of language use in context in an increasingly digitized and glocalized professional world. From practical angles, the contributions elaborate on potential pitfalls and benefits practitioners can expect from collaborating with researchers from various disciplines. For example, how practitioners can engage in – and benefit from – research projects by co-creating knowledge together with academic researchers. Phases of such activity include identifying wicked problems, formulating pertinent research questions, developing shared languages, engaging in ongoing dialogue, finding results and conclusions based on mutual learning, as well as developing and implementing tools that foster sustainable solutions.
Financial literacy and ethics. An Applied Linguistics’ perspective.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Marlies Whitehouse, AILA Treasurer, Zurich University Of Applied Sciences
In this presentation, I analyze the interdependence between the financial literacy of society-at-large and (un)ethical behavior in financial communication. The analysis draws on data from 25 years of ethnographic field research and from transdisciplinary research projects with the stakeholders in financial communication. 
Faculty-recruitment communication ironies: How colleges fail to measure up to their own job-search requirements.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Christopher McKenna, Associate Professor, Business Communication And Legal Studies, Stephen F. Austin State University
To what extent are universities failing to conform to specific professional-communication and human-resource “best practices” during the faculty-recruitment cycle? As this case study suggests: much too often.
To measure or not to measure? Vague language in CSR communication
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Marina Bondi, University Of Modena And Reggio Emilia
The talk looks at the use of vague language in reporting social and environmental performance and impact. The issue is explored through linguistic elements (quantifiers, hedges and approximators) and rhetorical elements (with a focus on illustrations by example). These are related to reputation-building principles and key CSR issues.
Transdisciplinarity and executive coaching? An example of researching questioning practices
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Frédérick Dionne, University Of Klagenfurt
Eva-Maria Graf, University Of Klagenfurt
This talk focuses on the professional format ‘executive coaching’, on how coaching research and coaching practice (do not) collaborate and introduces a transdisciplinary project on questioning sequences in coaching, which brings together linguistics, psychology and coaching practice. Transdisciplinary affordances and possible solutions are illustrated in the context of this project.
Knowledge-Brokering in the Social Sciences: Mediating Research for General Readers
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Eun-Young Kim, Andrews University
This study examines three popularized social science texts, focusing on what discursive features they employ as they broker academic knowledge to non-specialized audience. It identifies common and unique de-academicization strategies observed across texts and illuminates how effective knowledge communication is actualized in popularized texts. 
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S012 | Bilingualism and the separation of languages
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Frankie Har, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Gerard Murphy, University Of Edinburgh
Alimujiang Tusun, University Of Cambridge
Simone Oliveira, Federal Institute Of Minas Gerais (IFMG)
Satomi Mishina-Mori, Rikkyo University
Jochen Rehbein, Institute Of German Philology (IFG I
Moderators
Bram Vertommen, KU Leuven
The hallmark of bilingualism is that it involves the co-existence of two or more languages. This can manifest in many different ways, roughly ranging from complete separation, in which each language has its own domains of use, to complete integration, in which the languages are constantly used together. Patterns of use are largely determined by the demands of the social setting, in which the desirability of separation may be emphasized to a greater or to a lesser degree. These patterns, in turn, have cognitive consequences: constant separation leads to some degree of separation of knowledge stores in the mind ('being proficient in two languages'), while constant mixing leads to a more integrated type of mental representation ('speaking a hybrid'). These different proficiency distributions, finally, may link up well or not so well with societal and community expectations, and these two levels may impose conflicting demands on speakers. This workshop explores these effects, theoretically by accounting for them through a usage-based approach, and empirically through investigations of language mixing in settings that differ in the degree to which they emphasize the importance of keeping languages separate.
Language Choices among Hong Kong Civil Servants: A Case Study of Adult Learners’ Plurilingual Practices in Instant-Messaging Communication
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Frankie Har, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Code-mixing is a common sociolinguistic phenomenon in Hong Kong, in which Hongkongers integrate English words into their host language (Cantonese) for more effective communication. This presentation explores the linguistic phenomena of and possible reasons for Cantonese-English code-switching and code-mixing in the government domain.
Exploring the effects of intimidation on bilingual Arabic speakers in the UK and consequent language attitudes and public language use.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Gerard Murphy, University Of Edinburgh
Intimidation has a profound effect on Arabic speakers in the UK, drawing a clear boundary on where it is unacceptable to use foreign languages in public. It was found that a significant number of individuals who had been intimidated for speaking Arabic in public felt uncomfortable speaking Arabic in ‘transit spaces’ (e.g. airport, train stations). This has potential implications for the maintenance of migrant languages in the UK.
Uyghur-Chinese early successive bilinguals’ acquisition of caused motion expressions
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Alimujiang Tusun, University Of Cambridge
This study looks at the acquisition of caused motion expressions by Uyghur-Chinese early successive bilinguals. Two specific issues it aims to address are 1) the relative role of universal cognitive factors versus language-specific properties in children’s language development and whether and to what extent is the acquisition process modulated by cross-linguistic influence.
Non-Native early bilingualism in Brazil: A Case Study on the phenomenon of child bilingualism in Brazilian families
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Simone Oliveira, Federal Institute Of Minas Gerais (IFMG)
This study discusses the effectiveness of early bilingual upbringing of children in Brazil – a monolingual country – by Brazilian parents, who are non-native speakers of the language they are passing on to their children. I analyze the parents’ role in the child’s language acquisition, the communication strategies and the problems encountered.
Referent re-introduction in bilingual narratives: A qualitative analysis of crosslinguistic influence
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Satomi Mishina-Mori, Rikkyo University
Co-authors :
Yuki Nakano, Tokyo Kasei University
Yuri Jody Yujobo, Associate Professor, Tamagawa University
Appropriate referential choice at re-introduction context in narratives requires integration of varying levels of information, and thus has been claimed to be the locus of transfer in bilinguals. We present a qualitative analysis of Japanese-English bilingual children’s Japanese narratives to elucidate the strong influence of English referential strategy.
Nexus
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Jochen Rehbein, Institute Of German Philology (IFG I
Co-authors :
Safiye Genç, Institute Of German Philology (IFG I
Principally speaking, a ‘nexus’ establishes an interrelation between languages and/or varieties in diverse dimensions of linguistic action. We found nexus interrelations within a linguistically fused symbol field (lexicon, vocabulary), cross-linguistic phoric procedures, cross-linguistic finite constructions, cross-linguistic deictic procedures, cross-linguistic coordinators, cross-linguistic semantics, cross-linguistically discriminating synonymy, nexus in the dimension of rhetorics (synecdoche), etc.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S013 2/2 | Building Disciplinary Literacies in CLIL
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Tarja Nikula, University Of Jyväskylä
Anne McCabe, Saint Louis University
Silvia Bauer-Marschallinger, University College Of Teacher Education Vienna/Krems & University Of Vienna
Thomas Hasenberger, PhD Student, Teacher, University Of Vienna
Valia Spiliotopoulos, Assistant Professor Of Teaching, University Of British Columbia
Christiane Dalton-Puffer, University Of Vienna
Natalia Evnitskaya, Lecturer In TEFL, Universitat Internacional De Catalunya
Moderators
Julia Huettner, University Of Vienna
Christiane Dalton-Puffer, University Of Vienna
Seyit Omer Gok, AILA2021 Volunteer
Content-and-Language-Integrated-Learning (CLIL), especially targetting English, is by now undoubtedly part of mainstream education in Europe and matched by a vibrant research scene. Existing studies have highlighted the effects of CLIL on general foreign language competence, which are overall positive, but given the complementary nature of CLIL to EFL classes, this improvement is arguably not that surprising. In fact, the crucial question for CLIL practice and research is currently to identify its unique contribution to learning and conceptual development. This symposium argues that one of these contributions is the learning and use of English in the ways deemed appropriate in the specific subjects studied, e.g. History or Biology. We aim to bring together established and emerging scholars in applied linguistics and subject education to allow fruitful discussion of findings in diverse contexts and from a range of perspectives. Possible areas of focus include, but are not limited to: - terminology learning and use - the link between subject-related competence(s) and discourse competence(s) - genre use and learning - interface between L1 disciplinary language use and learning and L2 disciplinary language use and learning - participant perspectives on L2 disciplinary use and learning - pedagogical advice We are aiming for a mixture of presentations and poster presentationsS013 detailed programme, click here
Language as subject-specific meaning making: on shifting orientations to language in CLIL
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Tarja Nikula, University Of Jyväskylä
This presentation provides an overview of shifting orientations to language in CLIL research, realized as growing attention to the notion of integration and to the need to conceptualize language skills to be attained in CLIL as subject-specific and connected to knowledge creating practices of different subjects and their disciplinary origins
Evaluating History: A Longitudinal Study of Student Writing in Bilingual Education
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Anne McCabe, Saint Louis University
We present an analysis of the construction of the cognitive discourse function evaluate in a longitudinal corpus of student writing in L1 Spanish and L2 English in subject history from Grade 6 through Grade 10. Results show an evolving inclusion of historical data to back up evaluations across languages.
Developing historical literacy by working on Cognitive Discourse Functions in the CLIL classroom: A Transdisciplinary Approach
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Silvia Bauer-Marschallinger, University College Of Teacher Education Vienna/Krems & University Of Vienna
This study explores how the concept of Cognitive Discourse Functions can be used to improve competency-based history education in the context of Austrian upper-secondary CLIL history programmes. Following design-based research methodology, CDF-based history materials were designed, continuously developed, and evaluated, thereby addressing the lack of research-based implementation of content-and-language-integrative approaches.
Students’ uses of categorization in written CLIL history tasks from grade 6 to 10
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Natalia Evnitskaya, Lecturer In TEFL, Universitat Internacional De Catalunya
Christiane Dalton-Puffer, University Of Vienna
This study examines how a key discourse function in the construction of specialist knowledge - CATEGORIZE - is realized in the writing of CLIL history learners whose L1 is Spanish. This is a longitudinal study with data from grades 6, 8 and 10. Initial findings reveal a low presence of classifications and a high incidence of comparisons and show that abstraction appears in the learners' historical writing only towards the end of secondary education. 
“The science of it …”: the potential of cognitive discourse functions in CLIL
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Thomas Hasenberger, PhD Student, Teacher, University Of Vienna
Developing CLIL programmes requires educators to consider a multitude of aspects in order to design a curriculum that furthers both content knowledge and language skills. The talk introduces a CLIL science subject at an Austrian upper-secondary school that uses Dalton-Puffer’s (2013) cognitive discourse functions as a vital planning principle.
Scaffolding Peer Interaction through Table Talk within a Language-and-Content Integrated Business Curriculum: An Ethnographic Case Study in a Canadian University
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Bong-gi Sohn, Post Doctoral Fellow, Simon Fraser University
Valia Spiliotopoulos, Assistant Professor Of Teaching, University Of British Columbia
Given the significance that peer talks play in developing students’ interactive, oral language development in an internationalized multilingual university, from a 3-year ethnographic case study, we examined 2nd year business students turn-taking sequences. Through our findings, we highlight how the interaction (de)facilitates students’ learning, communication, and social participation.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S024 2/2 | Connecting second language acquisition research to language testing
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Andrea Revesz, UCL Institute Of Education
Dina Tsagari, Professor, Oslo Metropolitan University
Nansia Kyriakou, University Of Cyprus
Jing Xu, Principal Research Manager, Cambridge Assessment English
Mark Chapman, Director Of Test Development, WIDA, University Of Wisconsin-Madison
Jianling Liao, Arizona State University
Moderators
Parvaneh Tavakoli, University Of Reading
Chihiro Inoue, Senior Lecturer In Language Assessment, University Of Bedfordshire
Aline Oelen - AILA Volunteer, AILA2021 Volunteer
This symposium focuses on how second language acquisition (SLA) research and language testing can inform one another to understand key issues related to language proficiency and to validate language tests. While there is common agreement that the two fields can mutually benefit from one another, research findings emerging from the two fields do not always reach the other community. The symposium proposed here aims at bringing researchers from these two fields closer together to highlight in what ways the findings of their studies can inform theory and practice in the other discipline. The first featured speakers (Inoue and Tavakoli) will summarize the findings of research into task performance and their implications for language testing. The second speaker (Andrea Revesz) will highlight the implications of studies investigating the use of eye-tracking for language testing.
Validating L2 assessments for research purposes: How can insights from language testing inform SLA research
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Andrea Revesz, UCL Institute Of Education
This talk first reviews validation frameworks that can guide SLA research. Then, three issues are discussed: how to proceed with validating theory-derived research instruments, how to validate instruments for various uses, and how to plan validation into SLA research designs. The presentation ends with practical recommendations for validating research instruments.
The impact of a rating scale on high-stakes writing assessment
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Dina Tsagari, Professor, Oslo Metropolitan University
Nansia Kyriakou, University Of Cyprus
This project explores inter-rater reliability and how this informs the teaching of writing in SLA environments. Based on qualitative and quantitative data collected in a context of high-stakes writing assessment - explicitly focusing on the rating scale currently in use - we were able to distil insightful findings for the rating, examination and teaching process.
Exploring the order of acquisition of lexical collocations among Chinese learners of English
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Jing Xu, Principal Research Manager, Cambridge Assessment English
The present study analysed 2344 lexical collocations manually extracted from spontaneous L2 English speech produced by 60 Chinese learners of English. A clear pattern of improvement in their oral collocation usage was observed across proficiency levels. The implications of the findings for language assessment and learning will be discussed.
Examining the Task Effect on the Complexity and Fluency of Young English Learners’ Performance on an Academic Speaking Assessment
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Mark Chapman, Director Of Test Development, WIDA, University Of Wisconsin-Madison
This study examines how task variables (target proficiency levels and academic disciplines) influence linguistic features of speaking responses. Thirty Grade 1 students and thirty Grade 7 students responded to six English language proficiency speaking tasks. Findings indicate clearer differences in students' linguistic features across target proficiency levels than academic disciplines.
What automatic measurement of text similarity tells us: Development of second language learner writing
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Gyu-Ho Shin, Assistant Professor, Palacky University Olomouc
Boo Kyung Jung, University Of Pittsburgh
We measured how L2 writing is similar to L1 writing with respect to lexical/semantic quality through topic modelling (Word2Vec). Results indicate that the quality of L2 writing approximates to that of L1 writing as proficiency increases. Writing prompts were found to affect little in this progress.
Does discourse quality weigh more than linguistic quality in the evaluation of advanced L2 Chinese writing?
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Jianling Liao, Arizona State University
The assessment of L2 writing often contains a strong focus on linguistic dimensions. The current study investigates the organizational performance in advanced L2 Chinese argumentative essays using a variety of discourse measures and compares their predictive power for human ratings with linguistic accuracy measures.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S026 | Convenient samples and inconvenient truths in second language learning and teaching
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Suzie Beaulieu, Laval University
Emma Marsden, University Of York
Constant Leung, King’s College London
Liesbeth DePaepe, CTO (KU Leuven)
Urška Grum, University Of Potsdam
Kedi Simpson, PhD Candidate; Solidarity Awardee, University Of Oxford
Benjamin Kremmel, University Of Innsbruck
June Ruivivar, Concordia University
Jenna Altherr Flores, Teaching Assistant Professor, University Of Nevada, Reno
Bart Deygers, Ghent University
Aline Godfroid, Michigan State University
Marieke Vanbuel, KU Leuven
Sible Andringa, University Of Amsterdam
Moderators
Bart Deygers, Ghent University
Aline Godfroid, Michigan State University
Marieke Vanbuel, KU Leuven
Sible Andringa, University Of Amsterdam
Mohamed Salama, PhD Student (Moderator), University Of Groningen
An important lesson in behavioural research methodology is that generalization rests on randomly drawn samples from the target population. In practice, however, participants are drawn primarily from WEIRD samples, that is, Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic groups (Henrich, Heine, & Norenzayan, 2010). Convenience sampling and an overreliance on WEIRD samples is also prevalent in the field of SLA. Plonsky (2016) estimated that 67 percent of all samples consisted of college or university students. This is cause for concern as it may lead to biased or incomplete knowledge of second language learning and teaching (Tarone and Bigelow, 2010). Replication in non-WEIRD samples is desperately needed. Marsden et al. (2018) have shown research is seldom replicated, let alone in non-WEIRD contexts. This raises concerns about the generalizability and reproducibility of SLA findings. What do we really know about second language acquisition and teaching if we test WEIRD participants only and do not engage in replication? This is the central question in this colloquium, with Marsden and Plonsky as featured speakers. We are inviting submissions, replications or otherwise, that shed light on the possible consequences of this state of affairs for the quality of our knowledge of second language learning and teaching.
On replicability, reproducibility and study quality: What open science could bring
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Emma Marsden, University Of York
This talk illustrates concerns about the replicability and reproducibility of applied linguistics research, with data from methodological syntheses documenting our reporting, transparency, and sampling practices. It will then outline steps we can take to improve the situation, including Registered Reports, makings materials and data available, and working across multiple sites.
Plurilingual Mediation – Sampling Data or not?
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Constant Leung, King’s College London
In this talk, Leung will discuss the concept and operationalization of plurilingualism and plurilingual mediation in the CEFR-CV (2020) and how this aligns to relevant data.
Carrying out studies with low literate adult learners of French Lx: challenges and benefits
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Suzie Beaulieu, Laval University
Co-authors :
Véronique Fortier, University Of Québec Montréal
When conducting two partial replication and a larger scale needs assessment studies with students with limited or interrupted formal education (SLIFE), challenges were met at every step, from the informed consent procedures to data analysis. We will discuss these challenges as well as the benefits from working with non-WEIRD populations.
Language and literacy acquisition of low literate adult newcomers: towards a demand-oriented and project-based approach
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Liesbeth DePaepe, CTO (KU Leuven)
Mariet Schiepers, Director, Centrum Voor Taal En Onderwijs
For low literate newcomers, traditional L2 courses are often long and unrewarding. Using the Service Design methodology, we designed an innovative demand-oriented, project-based approach outside the traditional classroom in which learners can perform real-life tasks matching their needs and in which literacy, language and labour market skills are being developed.
Using meta-analyses to uncover inconvenient truths in L2 learning and teaching – Effects of intralingual subtitles on L2 listening comprehension
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Urška Grum, University Of Potsdam
Using the findings of a meta-analysis, this presentation exemplifies how sample characteristics impact study outcomes. Findings of subgroup analyses regarding various learner variables will be presented and discussed, highlighting the substantially different outcomes for WEIRD, i.e. Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic (Henrich et al., 2010), and non-WEIRD study participants.
A cognitive perspective on L2 listeners’ difficulties: a replication of Goh (2000)
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Kedi Simpson, PhD Candidate; Solidarity Awardee, University Of Oxford
In a well-known study of adult ESL learners, Goh (2000) found that most L2 listening problems were related to the ‘perception’ stage of the process. With a different population – UK lower-intermediate school children learning French and Spanish – the findings of a pilot replication study showed both similarities and differences.
Unknown vocabulary density, reading comprehension, and the 98% coverage figure: Replicating Hu & Nation 2000
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Benjamin Kremmel, University Of Innsbruck
Co-authors :
Bimali Indrarathne, University Of York
Judit Kormos, Lancaster University
Shungo Suzuki, Lancaster University
This paper presents a replication of Hu and Nation’s (2000) influential study on the 98% vocabulary coverage threshold for reading comprehension. Using a non-academic sample population, it will follow the original study design and also expand it to provide more robust insights into the validity of the 98% coverage threshold.
Engagement, Social Networks, and Sociolinguistic Performance: Informal Quebec French in Adult Immigrant Learners
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
June Ruivivar, Concordia University
L2 sociolinguistic development is associated with high engagement and large social networks, but this is largely based on research on university students. This study illustrates that older immigrant learners have different means of engaging with the L2 and can overcome social network limitations to support their own sociolinguistic development.
The interplay of text and image on the meaning-making processes of adult L2 learners with emerging literacy: Implications for test design and evaluation frameworks
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Jenna Altherr Flores, Teaching Assistant Professor, University Of Nevada, Reno
This research explores how refugee-background adult L2 learners with emerging literacy make meaning from multimodal assessment texts used in an English as a Second Language/English literacy program. The study investigates meaning-making from a social semiotic and multimodal design perspective, and reflects on the dialogic nature of meaning-making in assessment texts. Implications for test design and evaluation frameworks are revealed through this research concerning a non-WEIRD sample.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S031 2/2 | Cross-linguistic similarity in language learning and use
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Robert Taferner, Hiroshima University
Scott Jarvis, University Of Utah
Furong Wang, Xi'an Jiaotong University
Nadja Kerschhofer-Puhalo, Post-doc Researcher, PI Literacies & Multilingualism Research Group, University Of Vienna
Ilmari Ivaska, University Of Turku
Carles Fuster, Stockholm University
Moderators
Scott Jarvis, University Of Utah
Annekatrin Kaivapalu, Symposium S031 Organizer, University Of Eastern Finland
Joanna Porkert , AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
The symposium addresses cross-linguistic similarity as an underlying factor all through the language learning, development and use. Learning a new language (TL) is always based on the knowledge of the first (L1) or any formerly learned language (Ln). The starting point is what is similar between the TL and L1 or Ln. The similarity can be divided into actual (objective), perceived, or assumed. Particularly the comprehension of a closely related TL is greatly dependent on the perceptions of similarity across the languages. The construct of similarity, however, has not been much discussed or empirically studied. The aim of the proposed symposium is to fill this cap and to bring together empirical research on it, to advance the methodology of defining and measuring similarity across languages. Also the enhancement of language users' ability to perceive similarity by increasing their metalinguistic awareness requires a better understanding of the concept of similarity. In this symposium, cross-linguistic similarity is examined from three perspectives: 1) best practices for measuring cross-linguistic similarity using both objective and subjective (psycholinguistic) measures; 2) the effects of receptive multilingualism on language learning and use; and 3) the effects of metalinguistic awareness on language learners' ability to recognize cross-linguistic similarities.
Exploring (un)intentionality in lexical transfer: The role of crosslinguistic similarity and linguistic awareness
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Carles Fuster, Stockholm University
This presentation outlines results from a study on the difference between intentional lexical transfer (produced with awareness, on purpose) and unintentional lexical transfer (produced without awareness, accidentally). It will be shown that crosslinguistic morphological similarity and morphological (cross)linguistic awareness are the most important factors of (un)intentionality in lexical transfer. 
Partitive objects in L2 Finnish: A Laboratory of Construction-specific cross-linguistic influences
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ilmari Ivaska, University Of Turku
This paper explores cross-linguistic influences on object marking in L2 Finnish by contrasting advanced L2-learners from various L1 backgrounds. Possible analogical systems in learners’ L1s expose the alternation to cross-linguistic influences. The results suggest that such influences are not only construction-specific but also sensitive to constructional variation of neighboring phenomena.
Similarity, cross-linguistic influence and bias in non-native vowel perception – A critical view
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Nadja Kerschhofer-Puhalo, Post-doc Researcher, PI Literacies & Multilingualism Research Group, University Of Vienna
Based on data from a large scale vowel identification experiment, this paper will discuss empirically grounded ways to operationalize perceptual similarity in L2 by integrating contributions from SLA research, experimental phonetics and cognitive psychology. A method to visualize perceptual similarity of L2 categories by Multidimensional Scaling is presented.
Interactions of syntactic and semantic representations: cross-linguistic evidence on Chinese English speakers’ locative production
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Furong Wang, Xi'an Jiaotong University
We investigated the contribution of syntactic and semantic structures in the oral production of locative alternations in a cross-linguistic priming experiment on L1 Chinese and L2 English speakers. The results indicate both word order and thematic role ordering similarities facilitate the persistence of using location-theme alternation regardless of language direction.
Investigation of cross-linguistic semantic complexity for the acquisition of the L2 spatial and temporal prepositions in on and at
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Robert Taferner, Hiroshima University
Acquisition of the English prepositions in, on, and at for L2 learners are possibly the most difficult grammatical features to master. This presentation shows that cross-linguistic semantic and metacognitive complexity is responsible for this difficulty and that explicit instruction is required for the enhancement of their prototypical, polysemous, and abstract usages.
Cross-linguistic similarity in language learning and use: A debate
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Scott Jarvis, University Of Utah
This will be a summary of the main insights, key points, and intriguing questions raised during the symposium.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S044 | Emergent orchestration in technology-mediated language learning and teaching
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
John Hellermann, Portland State University
Ufuk Balaman, Hacettepe University
Wing Yee Jenifer Ho, City University Of Hong Kong
Regine Hampel, The Open University
Chenxi Li, The Open University; Xi'an Jiaotong Liverpool University
Anita Chaudhuri, University Of British Columbia
Marco Cappellini, Aix Marseille University, CNRS, LPL
Moderators
Wing Yee Jenifer Ho, City University Of Hong Kong
Melinda Dooly, Https://www.melindadooly.com/, Autonomous University Of Barcelona
This symposium showcases different analytical perspectives regarding interaction that takes place during language learning in technology-mediated settings, bringing the concept of 'orchestration' to the study of digital practices for learning. It will foreground how the agents- human and non-human- involved in the process of language learning, facilitated through different technology (e.g. videoconferencing, 3D virtual spaces, online gaming, mobile augmented reality), orchestrate the complex, multi-layered social interaction in different learning environments (formal and informal). Presentations will feature analytical perspectives such as Conversation Analysis, (Multimodal) Discourse Analysis, Sociocultural and Activity Theory, Social Semiotics, Dynamic Systems Theory, New Materialism, and other empirical methodologies that view technology as an integral part of the language learning process (not just as a medium). The aim of the symposium is to examine how multiple agents (people artifacts, and environments) contribute to interaction. Technology in language learning has been a subject of research for decades. However, only recently has substantial attention been given to issues of distributed agency, multimodality, and embodied cognition perspectives. Our goal, therefore, is to foreground analysis of human-human and human-technology interaction and to debate ways in which diverse and interdisciplinary methodological and theoretical approaches can bring insight into the complexity of technology-mediated learning.
Collaborative mobilizations of semi-permeable grammar
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Steven Thorne, Portland State University | University Of Groningen
John Hellermann, Portland State University
This paper reports on interactional practices (1: collaborative multi-turn units (Lerner, 1991) with synchronized shifts in bodily deixis, 2:performance of being a “with” (Goffman, 1971) around an iPhone, and, 3: the recombinatory reuse of words and constructions in the process of building a discourse object during augmented reality game play.
Conversation analysis and technology-mediated language learning: The interactional organization of video-mediated collaborative writing on Google Docs
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ufuk Balaman, Hacettepe University
Using multimodal conversation analysis, this study describes the interactional organization of task enhanced collaborative writing on Google Docs via Skype. The findings bring insights into the complex ecology of geographically dispersed participants’ video-mediated interactions in an L2 and contribute to research on conversation analysis, CALL, and second language writing.
Emergent orchestration and English Language Teaching: A case study of an online English teaching channel
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Wing Yee Jenifer Ho, City University Of Hong Kong
Co-authors :
William Feng
This paper proposes a theoretical framework for analyzing online pedagogical videos. Drawing on the notion of translanguaging (Li, 2018), this paper presents a multimodal analysis of three online English teaching videos to generate a theoretical framework that takes into account the 'trans-' nature of communication.
The disruptive effect of technology on interaction and meaning-making in the language classroom: a complex systems theory approach
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Regine Hampel, The Open University
Using a theoretical framework combining complex systems theory with sociocultural theory and the theory of multimodal communication, this presentation shows how the new online technologies are having a disruptive effect on the traditional language classroom and discusses the implications of this phase shift for teachers, institutions, policy makers and researchers.
Negotiation of modes: the key to maintaining harmony in the multimodal orchestration of synchronous videoconferencing interactions
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Chenxi Li, The Open University; Xi'an Jiaotong Liverpool University
If we consider interlocutors' video conferencing interaction (where multiple modes and semiotic resources are simultaneously available) as a multimodal orchestration, then how do interlocutors 'conduct' the orchestration to maintain to the harmony of their communication? Our participants managed to solve this problem by explicitly negotiating the use of mode(s).
Writer's Agency in Multimodal Discourse
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Anita Chaudhuri, University Of British Columbia
The presentation illustrates how interdisciplinary compositions can articulate multisensory processes. By classifying agency as a dynamic system between a writer and their audience, the multimodal aspect is foregrounded. Examples establish the self-organizing, fluid, ideological, and intentional principles of agency, which can be extended as effective tools for teaching and learning.
Affordances and discursive positionings in a French-Chinese etandem through desktop videoconference
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Marco Cappellini, Aix Marseille University, CNRS, LPL
In our paper, we propose to study a tandem language learning environment through desktop videoconferencing, or teletandem (Telles, 2009) for French and Chinese as foreign languages. Our study aims to understand how, through the videoconferencing environment, interlocutors position themselves and the interlocutor as experts or novices for the languages and/or topics discussed with a focus on the affordances they use.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S048 2/2 | Foreign Language Classroom Interaction from a Micro-Analytical Perspective: Implications for Educational Practice
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Gözde Balıkçı, Kahramanmaras Sütçü Imam University
Yoshiko Usui, Dokkyo University
Jing Wei, Southwest University
Moderators
Revert Klattenberg, University Of Hildesheim
Sara Razaghi AILA Volunteer, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
An increasing number of people worldwide are learning and speaking foreign or second languages, and the institutionalised practice of language teaching and learning has generated serious academic interest in the field of Applied Linguistics for a long time. Research based on conversation analysis (CA) methodology, for instance, has contributed to a better understanding of the multifaceted and complex nature of the classroom as a social setting and of how teaching and learning are accomplished in classroom interaction. In language teaching and learning, however, such methodologies are far from being considered mainstream. There is still a need for further research in order to obtain a better understanding of educational practices (feedback, instructions, disciplining etc.) and how they are influenced by classroom activities and teaching objectives. Most importantly, to facilitate successful teaching and learning, these micro-analytical findings need to be linked to educational reality. This symposium therefore invites researchers who explore the institutional practices involved in the teaching and learning of foreign or second languages. It discusses how these findings can inform educational practices such as teaching methodology, material design, language testing, curricula and language policies.Welcome to the second part of the symposium. There will be a short 'live' introduction at 14:30 (CEST). This is followed by recorded talks and live Q&A. To participate, please watch the respective videos. Then add your questions, comments, etc., to the Q&A area and join live for discussion (see schedule below). If you have questions/comments during the live Q&A and would like to speak, you can use the hand raise feature of the embedded Zoom environment to let us know. SCHEDULE LIVE: 14:30 | Introduction WATCH: 14:30 – 14:50 | Gözde Balikçi: Alternative Questions: Inviting student to talk in an EFL Speaking ClassLIVE: 14:50 -15:00 | Q&A with Gözde WATCH: 15:00 – 15:20 | Yoshiko Usui: Co-creation of a Community of Practice in an EFL Classroom in Japan: Classroom Interaction Strategies and TranslanguagingLIVE: 15:20 – 15:30 | Q&A with Yoshiko WATCH: 15:30 – 15:45 | Jing Wei: Exploring effective teacher feedback as a threshold concept in ELTLIVE: 15:45 – 16:00 | Q&A with Jing LIVE: 16:00 | End of symposium
Alternative Questions: Inviting student to talk in an EFL Speaking Class
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Gözde Balıkçı, Kahramanmaras Sütçü Imam University
Co-authors :
Fatma Gümüşok, Bartın University
This micro analytic study of classroom interaction focuses on alternative questions initiated by the teacher as a first pair part in a speaking course for learners of English at tertiary level. Alternative questions project one word answer from learners and enable them to be involved in the speaking task.
Co-creation of a Community of Practice in an EFL Classroom in Japan: Classroom Interaction Strategies and Translanguaging
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Yoshiko Usui, Dokkyo University
This case study analyzed four ninth-grade EFL classes at a junior high school in Japan to identify classroom discourse features that are effective in cognitively engaging learners in the process of meaning making as well as to explore how a community of practice is co-created through teacher-learner interactions.
Exploring effective teacher feedback as a threshold concept in ELT
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Jing Wei, Southwest University
This study proposes that effective teacher feedback is a threshold concept, the understanding of which transforms novice teachers’ conception of ELT teaching. This findings of this study show that the four teachers have different understandings of effective teacher feedback, reflecting the three stages of the understanding of threshold concepts.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S058 | How far are we in understanding the influential variables in the bilingual advantage debate?
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Esli Struys, Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Adam Winsler, Professor, George Mason University
Arnaud Szmalec, UCLouvain
Anahita Shokrkon, University Of Alberta
Martin J. Koch, University Hildesheim
Mila Schwartz, Head Of The Research Authority , Oranim Academic College Of Education
Midori Shikano, Nanzan University
Kristin Kersten, Full Prof. Of SLA & ELT, University Of Hildesheim
Moderators
Kristin Kersten, Full Prof. Of SLA & ELT, University Of Hildesheim
Julia Festman, Pedagogical University Tyrol
Katharina Polsterer, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
Saskia Nijmeijer, AILA2021 Volunteer, University Medical Center Groningen
The hot debate concerning the bilingual cognitive advantage is still ongoing. Numerous studies have found effects of bi- or multilingualism on cognitive abilities (dubbed 'bilingual effect' or 'bilingual advantage'): Children who grow up bilingually show higher working memory capacities, language awareness, and better cognitive control than monolingual children. Some researchers, however, have subsequently challenged the bilingual advantage hypothesis either on the grounds of possible publication biases, methodological flaws or due to the increasing number of studies reporting mixed or null results when comparing cognitive performance of mono- and bilingual children. The current debate seems to have turned from an initial search for the diverse skills in which bilingual children outperformed monolingual peers to current and focused attempts to understand the crucial factors modulating the bilingual advantage. Among these are the degree of bilingualism and the instructional contexts (in particular monolingual schools vs. immersion schools). Recent studies indeed reported positive effects for young learners in immersion programs. L2 attainment in such programs is much higher than in regular EFL programs, but not comparable, in general, with simultaneous bilinguals. Hence, the degree of L1/L2 mastery necessary for such effects to occur in sequential bilingualism is still an entirely open question.S05814.30-15.05 Esli Struys (key) 15.05-15.25 Arnaud Szmalec 15.25-15.45 Anahita Shokrkon, Elena Nicoladis 15.45-16.05 Martin Koch, Kristin Kersten 16.30-17.10 Adam Winsler (key) 17.10-17.30 Mila Schwartz17.30-17.50 Sophia Czapka, Julia Festman 17.50-18.00 Discussion
An exploration into cognitive effects of learning a foreign language and bilingual education
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Esli Struys, Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Now that the bilingual advantage debate has reached an impasse, one way forward could be to assess to what extent language education and different instructional contexts may play a role in the manifestation of bilingual effects on cognition. If children learn a foreign language at school, can they still be classified as monolinguals? And if foreign language learning is compulsory, then does it make any sense to look for bilingual advantages given the absence of a comparison group? Using a longitudinal design, we tracked the cognitive development of monolingual children before and after the introduction of foreign language classes and compared their performance to bilinguals from birth. Even though both groups showed equal performance at the two time points, the progress in the monolingual group was significantly higher than in the bilingual group. This finding suggests that monolinguals may catch up with their bilingual peers in cognitive performance after the introduction of foreign language education.
Executive control performance and foreign-language proficiency associated with immersion education in French-speaking Belgium
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Arnaud Szmalec, UCLouvain
We investigated executive control performance in pupils (n=513) following immersion education in French-speaking Belgium. Our results show significant gains in foreign-language proficiency for the immersed participants, without any measurable benefits on executive control. Our findings contribute to understanding how language and cognition develop through formal education methods that promote bilingualism.
Monolinguals matter! A cautionary tale on establishing a bilingual advantage
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Anahita Shokrkon, University Of Alberta
Co-authors :
Elena Nicoladis, University Of Alberta
Not all studies show bilingual advantages, highlighting the need for replication. This study replicated a study showing a bilingual advantage (Bialystok & Martin, 2004). We found no difference between bilinguals and monolinguals. Our monolinguals outperformed theirs. It is important to attend to monolingual children’s performance when testing for bilingual advantages.
Beyond language: The long-term benefits of multilingualism for self-regulation
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Martin J. Koch, University Hildesheim
Kristin Kersten, Full Prof. Of SLA & ELT, University Of Hildesheim
The present study investigates the long-term effects of multilinguism on cognitive flexibility by examining the relation between multilinguism and cognitive capacities of self-regulation in adulthood. Results support the assumption that multilingualism might contribute to long-term cognitive benefits. The mediating effects, however, remain to be clarified.
Becoming Bilingual in Miami: Predictors and Outcomes of English Acquisition for Young Dual Language Learners in Poverty
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Adam Winsler, Professor, George Mason University
Results of a large, longitudinal study examining predictors and outcomes of the acquisition of English among ethnically diverse, low-income, DLLs in Miami are reported. Social and behavioral skills and proficiency in Spanish at school entry are associated with L2 learning. support for home language in bilingual education programs is important.
Early language awareness as expressed in verbal and nonverbal interactions in the preschool bilingual classroom
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Mila Schwartz, Head Of The Research Authority , Oranim Academic College Of Education
The aim of this longitudinal ethnographic study was to explore how children's verbal and nonverbal behavior reflects their language awareness at a bilingual Arabic–Hebrew-speaking preschool in Israel. The study is beneficial for language teachers' understanding of how they can support children's language awareness.
How good am I at reading and writing? Mono- and multilingual children‘s self-concepts contextualized within the bilingual advantage debate
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Julia Festman, Pedagogical University Tyrol
We examine the contribution of instructional context on reading and writing self-concepts of monolingual and multilingual children. Results yielded no differences in self-concepts nor reading measures, but in spelling with monolinguals outperforming multilinguals, and positive correlations between self-concepts and academic achievement. We contextualize these findings within the bilingual advantage debate.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S059 | Individual Differences in Task-based Performance and Instruction
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Shinji Shimoura, University Of South Florida
Eline Van Batenburg, Amsterdam University Of Applied Sciences
Adriana Biedron, Pomeranian University In Slupsk
María Dolores Mellado Martínez, University Of Murcia
Ji-Young Jung, Columbia University
Gabriel Michaud, Université De Montréal
Daniel Márquez, Charles University
Marrit Van Guchte, University Of Amsterdam
Miroslaw Pawlak, Adam Mickiewicz University, Kalisz, Poland
Moderators
Niklas Abel, AILA 2021 Volunteer, University Of Groningen
Marije Michel, Co-chair AILA & Mentor, Groningen University
Individual difference (ID) variables refer to personal characteristics, traits, and dispositions that make individual learners unique, that cause variation among L2 learners, and that are postulated to have a direct or indirect impact on L2 learning outcomes. Recent years have witnessed increasing studies exploring the relationships between ID factors and task-based performance and their theoretical and methodological implications for TBLT pedagogy and L2 classroom practice. This symposium sets out to discuss the roles of key ID variables in affecting task performance under different task conditions and their implications for task-based instruction and pedagogy. The ID factors are broadly divided into cognitive and affective factors, in line with the current mainstream SLA literature (Skehan, 1998; Dörnyei, 2005; Ellis & Shintani, 2012). Special attention will be given to language aptitude and working memory in the cognitive domain and motivation and anxiety in the affective domain, due to their confirmed importance in task-based learning and teaching. Each individual difference factor will be conceptualized, operationalized, followed by a discussion of their specific roles in task-based performance (as measured by the established framework of the complexity, accuracy, fluency and lexis, i.e. CAFL; Skehan, 2014). Theoretical and methodological implications will be discussed as well.Oral Interaction in the EFL Classroom: Effects of Instructional Focus and Task Type on self-confidence, enjoyment and willingness to communicateLongitudinal effects of phonological short-term memory and working memory capacity on L2 grammar competenceIndividual Differences of Korean Learners in Task-based Speaking ActivitiesThe role of Language Aptitude and Timing of Form-Focused Instruction in TBLTEffects of Task Complexity and Motivation on L2 Pragmatic MovesOnline interaction in the task-based foreign language classroom: Effects on target language use and learner affectThe influence of cognitive and affective individual differences on the characteristics of L2 writing during task-based performanceUnderstanding the relationship between passion, perseverance, and motivation in Task-based Language Classrooms: The Role of Grit and L2 Selves (focussed)The phonological loop and the central executive as predictors of explicit and implicit knowledge of English passive voice (focussed)
Oral Interaction in the EFL Classroom: Effects of Instructional Focus and Task Type on self-confidence, enjoyment and willingness to communicate
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Eline Van Batenburg, Amsterdam University Of Applied Sciences
Research into the effects of three instructional EFL oral interaction programmes designed for pre-vocational learners in grade 9 (n=147) on learners’ self-confidence, enjoyment and willingness to communicate revealed positive effects of condition on learners’ self-confidence. In turn, only self-confidence was found to predict task achievement in dialogic speech tasks.
Longitudinal effects of phonological short-term memory and working memory capacity on L2 grammar competence
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Adriana Biedron, Pomeranian University In Slupsk
A longitudinal study which investigated the relationship between phonological short-term memory and working memory capacity and the development of L2 grammar competence over the period of 2 years was conducted. Among the four tests of working memory only listening span predicted the slope (i.e. changes over time), although the effect sizes were small.
Individual Differences of Korean Learners in Task-based Speaking Activities
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ji-Young Jung, Columbia University
Joowon Suh, Columbia University
This study examines influences of individual differences on oral proficiency measured by the CAFL framework. The data set consists of 168 speaking performances of 24 advanced-level learners of Korean as a foreign language (KFL) during task-based activities in two intact classes.
The role of Language Aptitude and Timing of Form-Focused Instruction in TBLT
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Gabriel Michaud, Université De Montréal
In this quasi-experimental research, the moderating role of Language Aptitude (LA) was assessed in relation to timing of Form-Focused Instruction within a task cycle (before, during or after the task) and level of proficiency of learners. Results show that different components of LA are associated with different levels of proficiency.
Effects of Task Complexity and Motivation on L2 Pragmatic Moves
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Daniel Márquez, Charles University
Increasing the cognitive demands of pedagogical tasks takes us to explore the effect of task complexity on L2 pragmatic production. We also examine to what extent L2 motivation influences task performance. The analysis of these interactions is intended to provide some insights into the understanding of L2 learning.
Online interaction in the task-based foreign language classroom: Effects on target language use and learner affect
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Marrit Van Guchte, University Of Amsterdam
Eline Van Batenburg, Amsterdam University Of Applied Sciences
Co-authors :
Daphne Van Weijen, University Of Amsterdam
In 3 experimental studies for German (9th grade), French (8th grade) and English (10th grade), we compared the effects of audio-, video-, and text-chat interaction on both the quantity and quality of learners’ TL use during 1) online task interaction and 2) subsequent oral F2F task performance.
The influence of cognitive and affective individual differences on the characteristics of L2 writing during task-based performance.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
María Dolores Mellado Martínez, University Of Murcia
Co-authors :
Olena Vasylets, Universitat De Barcelona
This study aims to shed light on the potential influence that cognitive and affective individual difference variables may have on the complexity, accuracy, and fluency (CAF) of L2 learners’ written texts. We administered diverse ID tests and questionnaires and correlated results with CAF measures of L2 writings during task-based performance.
Understanding the relationship between passion, perseverance, and motivation in Task-based Language Classrooms: The Role of Grit and L2 Selves
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Shinji Shimoura, University Of South Florida
In this study, the researcher examined how learners’ language learning motivation has changed over the course of the academic year in TBLT foreign language courses. Results suggest that persistence in L2 learning is a combination of long-term goals and vision with the personality characteristic of Grit.
The phonological loop and the central executive as predictors of explicit and implicit knowledge of English passive voice
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Miroslaw Pawlak, Adam Mickiewicz University, Kalisz, Poland
Co-authors :
Adriana Biedron, Pomeranian University In Slupsk
The paper reports a study which investigated the relationship between the phonological loop and the central executive, and explicit and implicit knowledge of English passive voice, taking into account the mediating effect of overall mastery of grammar (i.e., grades on the final exam) and self-reported length of study
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S070 | Knowledge about language for L1, L2 and FL writing
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Debra Myhill, University Of Exeter
Jeroen Steenbakkers, University Of Groningen | Ludger College Doetinchem
Jeannette Sanchez-Naranjo, Amherst College
Moniek Vis, University Of Groningen
Melanie Hof, NHL Stenden UAS | University Of Groningen
Abdulwahid Al Zumor, Presenter 'AILA Solidarity Awardee', KING KHALID UNIVERSITY
Paul Marlowe, Kwansei Gakuin University
Aleksandra Kasztalska, Boston University
Kees Glopper, Symposium Organizer, University Of Groningen
Ian Bruce, The University Of Waikato
Moderators
Kees Glopper, Symposium Organizer, University Of Groningen
Ninke Stukker, Session S70 Moderator, University Of Groningen, Center For Language And Cognition Groningen
This symposium addresses the relation between knowledge about language and writing in L1, L2 and FL. We hope to attract research papers and posters that deal with the design of written language and raise questions such as the following: 1. What kinds of explicit knowledge about language do students need in order to master the conventions of written language and to increase their meaning-making potentials? 2. What kinds of grammatical, rhetorical or stylistic descriptions of language can provide concepts that can be of aid to students? 3. What theoretical concepts can help explain the relation between explicit linguistic knowledge and awareness of students and their linguistic performance? 4. What combinations of exposure, reflection, analysis, and practice can provide students with control of forms and functions of written language? What is the empirical evidence for the effectiveness of specific teaching approaches 5. What are the perspectives, beliefs, knowledge, skills and experiences of teachers of writing? How are they equiped for teaching knowledge about language that fosters student writing? The symposium intends to spark conversation and collaboration between researchers that deal with L1, L2, and FL writing from various backgrounds, such as (applied) linguistics, writing research, functional grammar, and (pedagogical) stylistics.
Developing metalinguistic understanding in the teaching of L1 writing
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Debra Myhill, University Of Exeter
This presentation will consider the role of metalinguistic understanding in developing school writers’ explicit knowledge of how language choices shape meaning in writing. Drawing on research evidence, the paper will argue for the importance of helping developing writers to become metalinguistically aware, and increasingly assured in writerly decision-making.
Style perspectives: a meaningful grammar for writing
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Jeroen Steenbakkers, University Of Groningen | Ludger College Doetinchem
Co-authors :
Kees Glopper, Symposium Organizer, University Of Groningen
2017 saw the start of an intervention study about teaching grammar for writing (secondary school). We teach eight experienced teachers in (re)designing innovative, meaningful and playful lessons which teachers are happy to give. In this paper, I will present these lessons and experiences of teachers.
Genre-based Tasks in L2 Spanish Writing: Fostering Writing Skills and Sociolinguistic Knowledge
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Jeannette Sanchez-Naranjo, Amherst College
Drawing from L2 Spanish writing classes, this study explores the impact of genres in L2 writing skill development as the central goal for composition courses – arguing that such an approach best serves L2 Spanish learners and contributes to the integration of their L2 linguistic knowledge in their own writing skills.
A genre-based pedagogy exploiting reading-writing connections: effects on genre knowledge as manifested in student texts
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Moniek Vis, University Of Groningen
Co-authors :
Kees Glopper, Symposium Organizer, University Of Groningen
Amos Van Gelderen , Kohnstamm Institute / Rotterdam University Of Applied Sciences
Jacqueline Van Kruiningen, NHL Stenden University Of Applied Sciences / Open University
A genre-based pedagogy that exploits the connections between reading and writing is likely to improve aforementioned skills, and genre knowledge and awareness. This is tested by randomly assigning 12 grade 10 classes to either column or news article lesson series and subsequently assess reading and writing skills in both genres.
A stylistic description of written language development: what does it teach us?
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Melanie Hof, NHL Stenden UAS | University Of Groningen
Co-authors :
Ninke Stukker, Session S70 Moderator, University Of Groningen, Center For Language And Cognition Groningen
Veerle Baaijen
Kees Glopper, Symposium Organizer, University Of Groningen
Using a stylistic method of analysis, we determined how student and (semi-)professional writers linguistically realize the communicative purposes of the genre literary book review. We will show that such stylistic descriptions cannot only reveal how written language develops, but also which concepts can be of aid to help students improve their writing performance.
Linguistic strategies for expressing stance in advanced L2 students’ critique writing: a corpus based study
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Abdulwahid Al Zumor, Presenter 'AILA Solidarity Awardee', KING KHALID UNIVERSITY
This study explores stance-taking strategies as employed by advanced L2 students when they write a critique essay. Lancsbox corpus analysis tool was used to analyze the data. The study found that direct critical expressions are frequently used as boosters, various hedges are used, attitude markers are employed in a very limited range,  self-mention of personal pronouns is obviously common, and the degree of directness in expressing stance is high. The contribution of this research lies in its attempt to explore the type of language knowledge required to help in enhancing graduate students' integration into established academic writers' community. 
A mixed methods approach to understanding the development of syntactic complexity in L2 writing
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Paul Marlowe, Kwansei Gakuin University
How can writing instructors develop their learner’s syntactic complexity in the L2 classroom? The researcher used a mixed methods design to examine the effects of three types of tasks on the development of complexity. The results indicated that tasks that focus learners’ attention on syntactic aspects of language are more effective.
Legitimizing Knowledge and Knowers of Writing Instruction: A Case Study of International Teaching Assistants in the U.S.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Aleksandra Kasztalska, Boston University
Co-authors :
Michael Maune
Through focus groups, interviews, and questionnaires, 15 international TAs discussed fallacies about composition. Using Legitimation Code Theory, we argue that by emphasizing social attributes these fallacies prevent non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) of composition from professional legitimacy. We argue that emphasizing knowledge and skills in composition can help legitimize NNESTs.
Explicit language knowledge used to express criticality in academic writing: Findings from genre studies
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ian Bruce, The University Of Waikato
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Room 1
S076 | Language Education Policy in Asia – Any hope for indigenous languages?
Format : Symposium
Track : Virtual Session
Speakers
Anthony Liddicoat, Warwick University
Satoru Nakagawa, University Of Manitoba
Ee Ling Low, Dean, Academic & Faculty Affairs, NTU - National Institute Of Education
Andrew Moody, Presenter, University Of Macau
Danik Widiawati, Prince Of Songkla University
Naashia Mohamed, University Of Auckland
Azirah Hashim, AILA Vice-President , University Of Malaya
Richard Powell, Professor, Nihon University
Andy Kirkpatrick, Griffith University
Isabel Pefianco Martin, Ateneo De Manila University
Moderators
Andy Kirkpatrick, Griffith University
This symposium will investigate the major trends that can be determined from an overall study of recent language education policies across Asia (Kirkpatrick and Liddicoat 2019). The trends can be seen across three interrelated themes, namely: the promotion and privileging of one language as the national language as part of an attempt to create a nation state, often in polities that are linguistically extremely diverse; a decrease in the promotion of indigenous languages other than the national language and the neglect of these in education in many countries; and the promotion of English as the first foreign language in education systems, often giving other 'foreign' languages a minimal role in education. Papers in the symposium will consider possible reasons and motivations for these trends, the ideologies that underlie them and their consequences for education in the countries of Asia. Papers will also consider how some countries in Asia have developed multilingual responses in education, such as mother tongue language programs, and what such responses contribute to education in the countries concerned.
Language-in-Education Policy in Asia: The place of indigenous languages
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Anthony Liddicoat, Warwick University
The presentation surveys the ways that indigenous languages are presented in language education policies in the region and presents examples of different approaches in different countries. It shows that, although indigenous languages are represented in various ways in policy, their position is marginal in education in most countries.
Indigenous language reclamation in the neoliberal era
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Satoru Nakagawa, University Of Manitoba
In this paper, I will consider two questions for global Indigenous peoples like myself: What identities are currently available, adopted and valorized by Indigenous language speakers globally? How are positions like Indigenous language speaker, academic, activist and teacher altering in response to available neoliberal subject positions?
Language Education Policy in Singapore and its impact on the nation’s indigenous languages
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Ee Ling Low, Dean, Academic & Faculty Affairs, NTU - National Institute Of Education
This paper discusses language education policies in Singapore from post-independence to the present and compares these with the shifts in the linguistic landscape of Singapore in the same period. English dominance leading to the endangerment and death of the nation’s indigenous languages is raised and the long-term socio-cultural consequences discussed.
Educational Language Policies of Preservation and Endangerment of Cantonese in Macau SAR: Balancing Local, National and International Concerns
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Andrew Moody, Presenter, University Of Macau
The Macau Special Administrative Region of China is a small Cantonese-speaking community. Like many other Chinese-speaking communities, educational language policy attempts to preserve Cantonese and, at the same time, implement Putonghua and English as instructional languages. Census figures suggest that policy may be affecting Cantonese vitality, especially among school-aged speakers.
English-medium instruction at the primary level in Thailand: any space for a minority language?
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Danik Widiawati, Prince Of Songkla University
Co-authors :
Kristof Savski, Prince Of Songkla University
One of the features of the growing prominence of English across Asia is the proliferation of English-medium instruction (EMI) programmes, including areas where minority languages are used. This presentation will discuss EMI in an area of Thailand where Pattani Malay, rather than Thai, is predominantly spoken as an L1.
A balancing act: teachers’ ideologies and agency in language policy enactment in Maldivian schools
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Naashia Mohamed, University Of Auckland
This paper focuses on the agentive meaning-making role that teachers hold in enacting language policies in Maldivian schools. Drawing on data from curriculum documents, teacher surveys and interviews, I present how teachers’ ideologies about language and language teaching impact how they interpret policy and address linguistic imbalances in schools.
Contested concepts of 'indigenous language' in Malaysia.
02:30PM - 06:00PM
Presented by :
Azirah Hashim, AILA Vice-President , University Of Malaya
Richard Powell, Professor, Nihon University
Since independence, disputes over the curriculum have tended to take on a politicised and ideological dimension that goes well beyond pedagogical and technical issues. This presentation wil